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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 10/19/2001 10:41:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2001 10:53:17 AM EDT by Carbine_Man]
[:|] My son has enlisted in the Army. We did a lot of soul searching and had many sleepless nights about this. I didn't try to dissuade him, but I did try to help him see the seriousness of his decision. I'm proud of him, and I'm jealous! He wants to be a Ranger. I've never been in the military, so I don't know what to tell him, to help him get through training. He's going to Ft. Benning for basic training, then AIT, then airborne, then air assault (101st/Cambell), and then into Ranger school. It would be easier if I was going. I'd much rather go myself than have my own child die on some forsaken patch of rubble, even for a just cause (which this certainly is). In any case, [b]I want him to be successful!!![/b] I want him to develop the mental toughness required to get through what will be the toughest challenge he's ever faced in his life. If there's anyone out there that has been through Airborne training and Ranger school, can you offer him advice? Think: if this was your son, what would you tell him? "Dear James:" [USA]
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 10:49:41 AM EDT
If he hasn't already, tell him to read "Starship Troopers" by Robert Hielien (there's that I before E rule again). There are numerous ways this book could help out. And Most of all--Please extend my personal thanks---jeffery scott brown
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 10:52:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By hound: If he hasn't already, tell him to read "Starship Troopers" by Robert Hielien (there's that I before E rule again). There are numerous ways this book could help out. And Most of all--Please extend my personal thanks---jeffery scott brown
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IMHO Sound Advice.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 10:59:16 AM EDT
If he wants a look at what it takes to get through Ranger school, he can take a look at "Ranger School, No Excuse Leadership" by Brace E. Barber. Very interesting reading. And tell him Hooah! from a Jarhead.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 11:03:25 AM EDT
Start running!!!!! Start exersizing!!!!! Good Luck!!!
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 11:13:35 AM EDT
Get him motivated to get in shape. He needs to get in the best physical condition he has ever been in and then start from there. When he gets to Ranger training he can expect to be more cold, more hungry, more thirsty and more exhausted than he could ever possibly imagine in his worst nightmare and that's no B.S. He also needs to stay mentaly focused because when his body gives out, and it will, his mind will be the only thing that gets him through.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 11:16:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By hound: read "Starship Troopers" by Robert Hielien (there's that I before E rule again).
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Not a spelling flame... but I believe that it is Robert A. Heinlein. Apparently that "I before E" thing goes out the window when dealing with names... Excellent author though. I've read most of his stuff. "An armed society is a polite society." Viper Out
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 11:23:32 AM EDT
yo viper....not taken as a flame....I just spelled it according to the rules and it just aint rite......
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 11:24:21 AM EDT
Tell him thanks, and God speed.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 11:39:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By hound: yo viper....not taken as a flame....I just spelled it according to the rules and it just aint rite......
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Yep, it's I before E except after C, but that's just in normal English words. The man's name is not English, so the spelling could be different.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 11:47:39 AM EDT
[b]Make sure he gets a Ranger Contract upon enlistment![/b] Get it in writing! Otherwise, whatever some recruiter tells you is going to be bull***t. Recruiters are only interested in their own numbers. If a recruiter tells you a Ranger Contract isn't possible, bulls**t. Go find one that will get you one. It guarantees a shot at Ranger School. Otherwise, there are no guarantees. Tell your boy to get in shape, and follow orders. He'll be fine. It's all about heart. -SARguy
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 12:11:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 12:39:46 PM EDT
BTT
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 1:28:29 PM EDT
Son...join the MARINES. Starship Troopers is required reading.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 1:57:40 PM EDT
Dear James, I wish you the best as you begin your service to our Country. Thank you. Now, to get though basic training it is important to set a routine. Establish patterns for yourself and stick to what works. This will allow you to take care of you personal stuff and not be lagging when you fall out at O-Dark thirty. Lagging at fall ot, being out of uniform, being slow are all ways to make your basic a living hell. Some one will be the slowest. Don't let it be you. Plan ahead. At some point in your basic you'll start getting some descetionary time (very little). Use it to get ready for the next days traing rather than going to the PX. Listen to what you are told, think -- Then react. Do the Think Stage quickly. Find a buddy, rehearse out loud as you practice your common tasks -- visualize. AIT is more of the same. Airborne! Black Hats are intimidating even compared to Drill's. Move with a purpose, The PT should not be too tough given you've just finished Basic and AIT. Don't fall out of a Friday Run. Don't buy a set of wings until you've earned them. You will get some free time during Airborne -- Stay off of Victory Drive (or at least keep it zipped) and don't spend all your cash at Ranger Joes. Ground week is hard, you'll be sore and the saw dust sucks. Tower week is less strenous, but the Black hats will demand higher performace levels. Honor Ungawa! If there are Marines in your class, look out, they will be the craziest of Marines, and all Marines are crazy. Whatever you do, avoid going drinking with them, it can only lead to trouble. Jump week is a cake walk. Just remember the PLF is not feet, knees, face. Get through your 4th jump and even if you bounce on your 5th, we'll pin Silver Wings to your corpse. You earned 'em. I can't really help with Air Assault or Ranger as the "needs of the Army" prevented me ever getting a shot at these. I can tell you that Ranger is tougher than anything you've ever done. There is no shame in not making it. I know good men, that I would follow to hell that never earned their tab. I know others that hold the tab, that I wouldn't follow into a 7/11. Set your mind right, don't get hurt and never quit and I'm sure you'll get your tab. Good Luck and God Speed.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 3:39:16 PM EDT
Is he going only because of 9/11, or was he going to enlist anyway? I ask because (and this is just speculation) by the time he becomes a Ranger, the majority of the Afgan fighting may be over. After that, he'll still have 3+ years in his contract he has to serve out. This could be something he may want to consider. I've never been in the military, but I've been considering the Army Airborne. Everybody I've asked has said... RUN, RUN, RUN.....A LOT! He'll have to run nonstop 3-5 miles a day at jumpschool, and probably more once he gets to ranger school. All this is in commercial running shoes?, so make sure he's got quality footwear.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 5:37:04 PM EDT
Carbine -Man , you should be very proud if successful your son will be joining one of the most prestigious and heroic units in our military. One point though after Basic/AIT and after jump school my understanding is they do not go to Ranger School or Air Assault he will report to the Ranger Indoctrination Program ( RIP )which is about 4 weeks (not sure) after he will be assigned to a Ranger Batt. He will then have to prove himself over an undertermined period of time in the Batt. ( usually 9 mos.to a year )If he measures up he will be sent to Ranger School. Air Assault , Jungle expert school etc.. will usually be done with his unit . Again be proud and best of luck to him. God Bless America
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 5:59:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 6:17:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ColtM4: One point though after Basic/AIT and after jump school my understanding is they do not go to Ranger School or Air Assault he will report to the Ranger Indoctrination Program ( RIP )which is about 4 weeks (not sure) after he will be assigned to a Ranger Batt. . . . God Bless America
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Yeah, I keep getting the exact sequence mixed-up (I'm just a dumb civilian.) I know he said he will be assigned to a Ranger Battalion, but I'm confused as to what his relation to the 101st will be. I get the impression that he will officially be ending up (MOS?) at 101st, until he goes to RIP, then it changes. I think the point is, even if he doesn't go to, or finish, RIP (for whatever reason) he will at least go to the 101st, and get his enlistment bonus. Thanks for the good words. I want to compile this for his birthday tomorrow. Keep the "Dear James:" coming.
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 6:41:27 PM EDT
Now, my military experience happened in the late '70s (before women were sharing basic and such). This is what I remember: Basic training was a mental game -that's it. I wasn't a jock in high school but I ran sometimes and hiked alot, kept active. Basic PT was nothing compared to Airborne school!. AIT, was a piece of cake (Ft. Sam Houston, TX - medic school). I would hope Infantry AIT would be harder. Back to Airborne - Lots of pushups. One more time - LOTS OF PUSHUPS. The first day , first hour in class we did at least 100 pushups. They dropped you for anything. But then again, you need to build up those muscles. Running was much more intense also. I think the army runs in athletic shoes now (we did it in our good 'ole army boots). Have him work on his pullups too. One of the most important things I can think of that wasn't mentioned yet is, take care of his body. If he gets injured he may be dropped back a class or worse, dropped from the program all together(airborne school that is). Be a team player. I'm not talking about the team that tries to sneak off to go drinking, etc. I mean show support for the other troops, holler encouragement for the slow runners, etc. Be proud of where he's at and the signifigance of what he is doing and attempting to be. For you DAD; SUPPORT! The one thing he can't do himself is outside support. Whether or not any family members agree with what he's chosen to do with the next several years of his life, he should have the support of his family and friends. When he's dragging after a hard-ass week, maybe not so sure this was the right decision, that letter or care package from home at mail call will turn him around like nothing else. Someone needs to try really hard to be at his graduations too. For older guys (20's ?) this may not be as important. But for a young fella just out of the comfort of home this is usually a real booster. WSmac Remember, if he's in good physical shape now, the hardest part will be all MENTAL! May he fare well in his endevour!
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 9:54:01 PM EDT
BTT
Link Posted: 10/19/2001 10:18:52 PM EDT
Carbine_Man, You should be proud of your son! He has done what 99.9% young men his age can't or won't do, and that is to commit himself to defend our country. He has also set himself a goal, and that is a damn fine goal, to become a Ranger in the US Army. You need to support your son's decision and offer that parental support like only you and your family can do. Be proud of your son and the path he has chosen to follow. My only advice to him is to buy nice comfortable running socks and plenty of them. I salute you and your son Carbine_Man.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 7:15:59 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 8:10:05 AM EDT
What more can I add? He'll need to hang tough, persevere, work as a team, and yes, do a lot of pushups.
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