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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 10/1/2001 1:23:15 PM EDT
2 minutes ago I was notified that the Internet Company I work for just lost all funding and as of this moment I am unemployed. I'm 25, this is the first time this has ever happened to me. I have no idea what I'm going to do and I have idea how to proceed. Any help would be appreciated. I'm looking for any internet related job, right now either in the Detroit MI Metro Area or the Lexington KY area. If anyone has leads please email them to me at m1_swire@yahoo.com
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:28:57 PM EDT
Did you dump the girlfriend yet? If so you and lordtrader could start a club! [:P] But the really important part, was your company listed on f#$(@#company.com?
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:31:19 PM EDT
Sad to hear it. I'm assuming you're single, which is good. I got laid off three days after the birth of my son, who is our second child. I too am 25, and it was a devastating blow. I always thought if I did a good job and worked my butt off I'd do ok, but I found out that politics play a big part as well. Definitely a blow to my work ethic, but I've dealt with it. What's worse, is that I've been unable to find a steady job because everyoen who interviews me says "you're way more qualified for this position than we were looking for. You would hate this job." It's not like I'm asking to make more than they're paying. I just hate not being able to take care of my family. After October 31st I'll be unemployed as well, as my subcontract position will be no longer needed. This will be my third job this year after being laid off in March. At least the contract market is still good, so there's some stuff still out there. God Bless Texas
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:32:22 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:39:48 PM EDT
Haven't dumped my girlfriend yet. As I had mentioned in my follow up message the discussion brought out an issue that I've had. Basically we are both screw ups and we are talking about what our future might be. Anyway, I have skills in HTML, ASP, VB, COM, Javascript, XML, XSL. Also website design and management. To see some of the sites I have done goto, www.mcrgo.org, www.fire-balls.com, and www.gun-info.com. I am willing to relocate, where I might be willing to go, I don't know yet as I have some loose ends to tie up.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:39:53 PM EDT
Unfortunately this is not the last time it will happen. Start looking for a job immediately and be persistant. Never quit looking! Or this may be your chance to stat your own business. That's what I did 10 years ago.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:44:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:53:33 PM EDT
Unemployment releases your mind to focus on what you really should be doing with your career. If your employer went tits-up you have to question how much value you were adding or what you contributed to their profitability. My advice is to go where you can have a measureable impact on your employer's performance. Like others have said, "start your own business."
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:53:52 PM EDT
Look for a job where you can telecommute. With your skills, it doesn't matter whether you are in an office or your living room. That will open up your possibilities. best of luck.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 1:56:45 PM EDT
Dude, you have taken the first step! You have asked your friends on the AR15.com forum board for help. Networking! It sucks losing your job, but now is the time to put a positive spin on it. Positive as in you need to start looking for that new job. Time to re-evaluate your situation and think are you where you wanted to be at 25 when you started working for your former employer at 20. Is this a career field that offers job stability and advancement. Is there job satisfaction or is it all about the money. You can't sit back and contemplate your situation for too long. You need to hit the road to employment as soon as possible. I am sure that something is going to turn up. This is a rule of thumb I learned last week: On average it takes a month for every $10,000 a year. So if you want (or need) a $30,000 a year job it will take you on average 3 months to find that job. Last thing to remember: As of last week even with the stock market and the economy being injured by the shit of Sept 11th and the downturn in the economy before that, the US unemployment levels were just right about at the same place that they were in 1998, and that the stock market is at about the same place. 1998 was not a bad year as I recall. Keep looking and good luck!
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 2:15:43 PM EDT
depending on your situation, maybe moving to a college town, where housing is cheap and jobs are plentiful, could be an option. maybe you still have friends there or just pick an interesting place to live. youd have low expenses, could have some money coming in from even a lame job and use all of the career placement resources of the university to get you back on track. in the meantime, hanging out with a bunch of young energetic people and meeting lots of nubile hotties could lessen the impact of being unemployed.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 2:31:18 PM EDT
Sorry to hear that....... AMD my employer just laid off 2300 people.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 2:34:39 PM EDT
I do have my own business going; however, it won't come even close to paying all the bills. I've got contacts and have been networking already, which is why I posted here. I found it's about 10% what you know and 90% who you know in these types of situations. As far as adding to value to my company, my input was ignored because I wasn't one of the "elite" managers. The same "elite" people that watched the contract expire with our investor without trying to get an extension or some other type of work around, so that they would be bound to the funding they had promised. I never expected the company to make it because the technology we used was wrong and managment was too stuck on themselves to change it. Lately the managers seemed to have the philosophy of screw the client, we will give them what we think they want. Too bad that client was also an investor and they just walked out the door.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 4:10:54 PM EDT
Don't sell your guns!!!!!!!!!!! been there, you'll regret it down the road. there too hard to replace.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 4:33:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 4:38:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By beanbagger: depending on your situation, maybe moving to a college town, where housing is cheap and jobs are plentiful, could be an option. maybe you still have friends there or just pick an interesting place to live. youd have low expenses, could have some money coming in from even a lame job and use all of the career placement resources of the university to get you back on track. in the meantime, hanging out with a bunch of young energetic people and meeting lots of nubile hotties could lessen the impact of being unemployed.
View Quote
[b]I like the way you think[/b] [:D]
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 6:47:02 PM EDT
Sure sorry to hear about your situation, but it sounds as if you have a lot in your favor; your age, skills, and ability to relocate. If I might suggest something, try to downsize your lifestyle immediately. I used to live on the "edge" of my income, until several years ago when I scaled waaaaaaay back. Never been so happy in my life, living way below my means now! For me "less is more" except for one thing (ar's), man I got a weakness there, otherwise, I love livin on the cheap! Best of luck, keep us posted.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 7:04:57 PM EDT
Yes, listen to beanbagger. Networking, scoring nubile hotties and working to advance your career are all noble objectives at your age. Devote an equal amount of time to all three areas. :)
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 7:40:29 PM EDT
My condolences... I was laid off in july from my Telecom job. If you want to start your own business or look for a new job go for it (remember to file for unemployment asap), but most everything in the hi tech field is dead for now. Try to look at the bright side - this may be a good time to get out and enjoy life for awhile. I don't know if you've got any reserve $ saved up - if so why not visit some old friends and relatives...you know, just catch up on the things that matter in life. Look at it this way - you've got the rest of your life to slave in front of a computer, why not do something adventurous while you're revatively young?
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 7:54:21 PM EDT
Sorry to hear that we have to add another member to the down-but-not-out club. I told my wife that I would sell my guns...but only after we were living under a bridge in a cardboard box and the last can-o-beans was gone. Today is the my first day of actual unemployment. It only sucks a little so far. I'm sure the suck factor will increase inversly with the dwindling cash supply. Unemployment pays only 250/week, which won't even keep me in .22's. Something better come in quick. Don't let the bastards keep you down!!!
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 8:12:09 PM EDT
[left]Well iam 34 and i shure can tell you there is no shuch thing has job security trust me! this is not going to be your last unemployment exsperience. me; ive been layed off so many times i can forget about ever retiring! has with a 401(k) i would look into this, and CD's and problably mutual funds![/left]
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 8:12:22 PM EDT
I have worked construction for 27 years and had to find a new job each time I finished a building or bridge approx. 1 to 1.5 years. it is tough sometimes you have to commute (I have driven up to 1.25 hours each way. or work another state.( I have been in 6 states) I know it is tough. life is tough! do not feel sorry for yourself[:(]. your not alone. sometimes you take a bad job (i once worked for the sewer department. it paid the bills) till a better one comes along. if your under 26 the military is a fine option! good luck.(that which does not kill you makes you stronger and builds character)[>]:)]
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 8:16:28 PM EDT
I feel your pain. Got laid off in July, the job market is really harsh. People are demanding degrees again, for no reason other than to trim down the possible candidates a bit. I do telecom/ip networking/heavy cisco/unix stuff, and for every job opening, there's 10 _qualified_ candidates out there right now. 9 months ago, it was the opposite and you could write your own ticket. How times change. We should start an ar15.com job forum. Get some of us employed by the luckier members of the board. :)
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 8:18:35 PM EDT
Unemployment is just the First Step. It will get steadily worse from here on. That's what happens in a Fiat Currency Based Economy. ------------ Workers Brace For More Layoffs By Stephanie Armour, USA TODAY 09/28/2001 The terrorist attacks have employees fearing for the safety of their jobs, as well as for their safety in the workplace. More than 100,000 job cuts have been announced in the past week, and some economists predict there could be more than 1.5 million additional layoffs by next spring or summer as a result of the economic fallout from the Sept. 11 strikes at the World Trade Center and Pentagon. More than 4 of 10 (42%) Americans rate the current economic conditions as poor, up sharply from 32% back in late April, according to a USA TODAY/CNN/Gallup Poll taken on Friday and Saturday. Signs of the concern: • Grief counselors are fielding questions about job security. Crisis counselors say they're hearing more employees voice fears about their personal finances and the economy. "The concern is being felt from the top down to the employee level. Some CEOs are saying they are going to have to lay people off, but they feel guilty because of the timing," says Richard Chaifetz, CEO of ComPsych, a Chicago-based provider of employee assistance services. "They may lay off someone who just lost a loved one or been injured. There's a real concern that's just now surfacing." • Employees who fear layoffs are curtailing spending plans. Employees in the airline, tourism and other industries have in some cases put off purchases or tightened spending just in case. "I have restricted my budget in all areas to prepare myself for the possibility of being furloughed," says Michael Fitzgerald, an aviation maintenance technician in the area of Fort Worth. "It's going to affect a lot of people. More and more people in unemployment lines is not good for the economy, which was already stumbling." • Job seekers are concerned the hunt may take longer. Companies have been so focused on recent events that hiring in some cases has come to a halt. "Last week, everything got put on hold, and offers that were to be extended stopped," says Allen Salikof, CEO of Cleveland-based Management Recruiters International. "There are going to be a tremendous number of people unemployed out there. There could be a glut, and competition will be stiffer." Profit warnings have increased since the attacks, and about 16 of the 25 S&P 500 companies making pre-announcements since Sept. 11 have warned earnings won't meet expectations, according to Thomson Financial/First Call.
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 8:54:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/1/2001 8:51:52 PM EDT by snipersen]
Swire, My Mom is the office manager at Cyberlink in South Bend, In. (This isn't her but she said to send it here.) E-Mail your resume to: jtrimboli@cyberlink.com Good Luck! (edited to fix e-mail addy)
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 11:12:49 PM EDT
How much longer until "Patriots: Surviving the Coming Collapse" happens? "May you live in interesting times"- an old Chinese proverb I like: "May your past sins come to revist you with vengeance."
Link Posted: 10/1/2001 11:43:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/1/2001 11:39:04 PM EDT by jhasz]
Ok, from a really old fart (apparently)... 16 years ago, sometime around the 3rd month after gettign married, my boss decided that he no longer needed my services. I went into a tailspin... took me about 2 years to get my head on straight. Here is what I learned, and maybe you can benefit from it. First, sit down and list [b]everything[/b] you've done in your professional career - what languages you can program in, etc - don't worry about how small it was, just do it - if you were involved in a project for 15 minutes, list how you helped.... Then list exactly how you saved you employer money or made him money - how you added value above and beyond what you were paid for. Next expand the list to include absolutely anything you may have done, even in your off time or as a hobby. Now, from all this info (should be at least a couple pages, just a straight out list) look for the pattern. You probably have gravitated unknowingly to a type of project, find it in the list - or at least determine from the list those things you would like to do. Make a list of things/projects you would like to take on. Finally put together your "story" Think of questions that employers might ask, think of an answer for those ahead of time. Liek the hellish question "What do you see yourself doing 5 years from now" We all know in this biz that 5 years from now you won't be at that employer, but humor him - figure out what a good answer will be. Refine it, make sure you kbsolutely know your answer to some of these questions up front. When in the interview, look for something in the office that you can connect to the interviewer with. You like motorcycles? If he's got a calendar with Cycle pictures in it, mention it, [b]before[/b] you settle in for the interview. These setps will give you confidence in yourself (because you need it right now) and that confidence will project to the interviewer. They want to know they are hiring someone that honestly believes they can get the job done. That will get you into some positions you might not be fully prepared for - but work your tail off to prove yourself...the rewards will follow. If you want any other advice, feel free to email me (I've landed nearly 25 positions in the last 15 years. I contract... a lot)
Link Posted: 10/2/2001 9:07:12 AM EDT
I lost my Job 3 weeks ago. It was the second layoff by the Dot Com where I used to work. Being in "Silicon Valley", every job opening has hundreds of applicants and a lot of time hiring managers just never see your resume. It just gets lost in the shuffle. In my area, most software companies consider Software QA to be a Luxury. Just keep looking. Also keep your options open for getting into a completely different line of work.
Link Posted: 10/2/2001 9:44:17 AM EDT
SWIRE - I feel for you. I was laid off last Friday, along with several other people in my company. The reason given was that "we're outsourcing all development as a cost-cutting measure, so we don't need you any more. Bye." I spent this morning at the unemployment office. Now I know where people who can't hack it at DMV go to work... BTW, I'm still getting married at KCR on Friday... losing my job won't affect that. However, unlike my prior visits, I'm not going to be spending much money there this time. :( Oh yeah, if anyone knows of a job opening in northern VA for a systems analyst with experience in VC++/windows programming, SQL, HTML/web development, etc, drop me a line...
Link Posted: 10/2/2001 9:54:40 AM EDT
Thanks for the encouragement everyone. For everyone who has been recently laid off, I hope we all find new jobs soon. This is my last post from my previous job location, as I am finished cleaning out my desk now. I want to thank everyone for all the support they have given me recently.
Link Posted: 10/2/2001 11:07:13 AM EDT
NETWORKING is the key. Attend those association meetings you didn't have time for. Get active in your church and other charity work. Almost every charitable organization has a need for the skills you list. These groups have potential employers associating with them. Learn new skills at the community college or library classes. If it is not career related, all the better. The object is to meet people. I registered with temporary agencies to do software testing. It was a fun way to spend a day, and an easy way to evaluate the firms I visited. And last, but maybe most important, contact those people outside the company that you have worked with over the years and let them know you are looking for work. Make sure they know how to contact you. They are the ones who will have the most opportunity to drop your name somewhere it will do the most good. This goes double for your vendor contacts. Salesmen know it is much easier to sell to you a second time than to sell to a new prospect. Good luck.
Link Posted: 10/2/2001 11:20:37 AM EDT
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