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2/23/2017 5:55:53 PM
Posted: 5/14/2005 3:08:24 PM EST
How hard is it to sew nylon webbing? I want to make a sling of my own design, and want to make it right which would mean breaking out the sewing machine - yes, real men sew...

Can a regular machine get through two layers of nylon webbing? What kind of thread is best? Are there any precautions that I need to know?

Any help or experiences would be great!

Don
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 3:18:34 PM EST
bump for reply
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 3:25:16 PM EST
If the nylon is that thick just punch holes in it and lace it together with fishing line. I used to hand sew cat eyes on my head gear using dental floss. Materials like dental floss and fishing line will endure the elements.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 4:50:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/14/2005 5:42:44 PM EST by A_Free_Man]
My wife sews webbing with no problem with her machine. I also have a contact with a person that does this in a commercial outfit that makes safety gear, fall protection harnesses, etc. I'll check with her, too. I'll be monday before I can find out.

You need to "burn" the edges where you cut like you do nylon rope, or the cut end will unravel.

They generally sew in a rectange, for 1" webbing, about a 1" square, then sew and X pattern in the middle.

My wife uses a thicker, stronger needle, and dacron thread. But uses her regular machine, hand won't do. She says use a straight stitch but go over it a couple of times.

Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:07:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/14/2005 5:27:45 PM EST by 50cal]
As a former parachute rigger, it depends on the thickness and tensile strenght of the webbing to be sewn. Some webbing needs to be done on a medium or large sewing machine. We had a machine that had a needle big enough to sew two pieces of 3/4" plywood together.

We had some parachute harnesses that had to be repaired that it was required to use a medium machine to sew 2 pieces of 100 lb test together.

Oops, meant 1000 lb test.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:14:24 PM EST
use polypro and just superglue it together.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:16:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By 50cal:
As a former parachute rigger, it depends on the thickness and tensile strenght of the webbing to be sewn. Some webbing needs to be done on a medium or large sewing machine. We had a machine that had a needle big enough to sew two pieces of 3/4" plywood together.

We had some parachute harnesses that had to be repaired that it was required to use a medium machine to sew 2 pieces of 100 lb test together.



You were a rigger, eh? I always thought you were a grunt. No matter. Thanks for keeping us safe in the harness.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:21:26 PM EST
Depends on the webbing. You need a harness machine for "real webbing" and it needs to be sewn with 5 or 6 cord nylon.
To sew "tape", like most slings are made of, you can get away with a lesser machine but you must use E thread.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:26:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:

Originally Posted By 50cal:
As a former parachute rigger, it depends on the thickness and tensile strenght of the webbing to be sewn. Some webbing needs to be done on a medium or large sewing machine. We had a machine that had a needle big enough to sew two pieces of 3/4" plywood together.

We had some parachute harnesses that had to be repaired that it was required to use a medium machine to sew 2 pieces of 100 lb test together.



You were a rigger, eh? I always thought you were a grunt. No matter. Thanks for keeping us safe in the harness.



I was 11b1p for 10 years. After I got out from Active the only Airborne Reserve unit I could find local to me was a Rigger unit. That way I could keep my jump status while in the Reserves. No way in hell I was going to be a leg in the Reserves.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:42:59 PM EST
I made some straps for a bike rack using 3 or 4 layers of 1/2 and 3/4" nylon webbing. A heavy duty needle and paying attention was all that was required. Not sure if that was why Ma Danby needed to get new needles, a new machine and doesn't let me near her new one.

Actually going slow was the key for me.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:52:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By 50cal:

Originally Posted By Sin_Bin:

Originally Posted By 50cal:
As a former parachute rigger, it depends on the thickness and tensile strenght of the webbing to be sewn. Some webbing needs to be done on a medium or large sewing machine. We had a machine that had a needle big enough to sew two pieces of 3/4" plywood together.

We had some parachute harnesses that had to be repaired that it was required to use a medium machine to sew 2 pieces of 100 lb test together.



You were a rigger, eh? I always thought you were a grunt. No matter. Thanks for keeping us safe in the harness.



I was 11b1p for 10 years. After I got out from Active the only Airborne Reserve unit I could find local to me was a Rigger unit. That way I could keep my jump status while in the Reserves. No way in hell I was going to be a leg in the Reserves.



Hooah. 10 years. You've served our country more than I have, that's for sure. Thanks for your service.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 5:54:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
My wife sews webbing with no problem with her machine. I also have a contact with a person that does this in a commercial outfit that makes safety gear, fall protection harnesses, etc. I'll check with her, too. I'll be monday before I can find out.

You need to "burn" the edges where you cut like you do nylon rope, or the cut end will unravel.

They generally sew in a rectange, for 1" webbing, about a 1" square, then sew and X pattern in the middle.

My wife uses a thicker, stronger needle, and dacron thread. But uses her regular machine, hand won't do. She says use a straight stitch but go over it a couple of times.




+1!

i've done this a lot, use my normal machine, straight stich, and so the square & X thing for the extra toughness. and yes, the thicker needle and thread is needed.
Link Posted: 5/14/2005 6:39:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/14/2005 6:40:01 PM EST by natez]
Yes, you can make your own slings, web gear and accoutrements rather cheaply. Just burn the ends and stitch the heck out of it.

Check out Strapworks for all of your home-built webbing needs, and the raw materials are fairly cheap.
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 6:08:28 AM EST
Fantastic, thanks all
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