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Posted: 6/14/2001 11:10:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/14/2001 11:20:46 PM EST by Signals]
Maybe "hate" is too strong a word, how about I am disappointed with my Glock. Hey don't get me wrong, I know many out there love their Glocks and have nothing but praise for this pistol, and I must admit that I have always been fascinated with them: I liked the fact that its design makes no concessions to the popular view of what a pistol should look like, and it's black, ugly, and tough. However, I just can't shoot them! At work my issue firearms is a Smith and Wesson, and in the Army Reserves we use the Browning High Power. With the Smith and Wesson, I shoot very well, as with the Browning. However, when I go with my co-workers to the range on our off time, they expect me to be driving tacks, but with my Glock 17 I just can't get the accuracy that I require: the sights are like lego blocks, the trigger is squishy, and it does not handle that well for me. During my last range outing I shot my Glock, poorly as usual, until my confidence was shot, and then my friend gave me his Sig 226 to try. The 226 was a dream! I hit everything I pointed at,and it even functioned better than my Glock. I'm sold. My next purchase will be a Sig 226, without a doubt. As for the Glock, during my last range outing I was planning on tossing it in the lake, but I think I'll hang on to it. Maybe I can learned some pointers from some Glock fans, so the gun will work for me too.
Link Posted: 6/14/2001 11:17:18 PM EST
first off, The Glock grip is like no other around. To truly shoot a Glock, you must finger it, and for lack of a better phrase, Know the pistol as if you would know your woman. Hold it in your hand, Feel how she curves, Know every bump and line of her frame. Then after you know her feel, Replace her sites. Even the finest of ladies need a tuck and a snip here and there. Find some sites that work for you. I'm a Trijicon kinda guy myself, But get what works for you. Now that you have your lady....Ummm I mean Glock custom fit to you, go to the range and learn her. As with any relationship, We must give and take. Learn your weapon, and let her learn you. OK, I'm gonna stop before thins gets pornographic, But you get the point......WOW, Do i need a cigertte [;0]
Link Posted: 6/14/2001 11:26:40 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/14/2001 11:31:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/14/2001 11:35:31 PM EST by OLY-M4gery]
1) get rid of the stock sights, I hate'em too, get nice night sights, trijicon, they give a better sight picture, even in daytime. 2) What strenght trigger spring? Is the gun new or used? Have a Glock armorer look at the connector/springs they can tell the spring strength by sight. Make sure the connector is straight. Get used to the trigger safety thingy, people don't like the feel of it, learn to ignore it. 3) If the grip isn't good get stick on sand paper or rubber grips, about $9.00, you can improve/change the feel with those. 4) If you are an experienced shooter the Glock might point "different" than most other handguns, higher than S+W is the usual comment. Get used to it, practice, with an empty gun, acquiring a target and squeezing the trigger. 5) The sear reset is like the S+W, after a shot you only have to let it go forward a smidge, do this and the trigger squishiness becomes less of an issue.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:38:03 AM EST
I'm the opposite of you,my dept. issues S&W and I HATE them!I've learned to shoot the Smith well,however when I go to shoot a Glock I have to readjust my grip.I've found that I have to point the muzzle of the Glock lower than the Smith.Once I do this,I usally shoot pretty well.I think you may want to play with your grip when you shoot the Glock,I hope this helps.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:59:49 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 2:31:10 AM EST
Your Browning HiPower is a nice piece. People don't seem to mention them much these days but they are a fine sidearm.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 3:20:13 AM EST
I have had the same experience with Glocks. They pointed high for me, and I didn't feel like training enough to eliminate all the other guns I own, which have similar grip angles to the Sig. I dropped the Glock in favor of the Sig because of this. Had the Glock grip angle worked out better for me, I probably would still be carrying one. They're great guns. Never a jam, never a bobble, no problems whatsoever. The only thing is I haven't had problems with Sigs either, and I didn't have to relearn anything. Just my preference. Ross
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 3:52:39 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 3:58:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By Signals: During my last range outing I shot my Glock, poorly as usual, until my confidence was shot, and then my friend gave me his Sig 226 to try. The 226 was a dream! I hit everything I pointed at,and it even functioned better than my Glock. I'm sold. My next purchase will be a Sig 226, without a doubt.
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This is why I own three Sig Sauer pistols. The blocky Glock grip just doesn't ever feel "right" to me. OTOH I've done well out of the box with every Sig I've touched, including the full-size P226 and P220, and I have small hands.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 4:05:22 AM EST
Originally Posted By Waldo:
Originally Posted By Signals: Maybe "hate" is too strong a word, how about I am disappointed with my Glock. .
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I'll let you join my club[%|]
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I'm in. Glocks are reliable, but they aren't the only reliable pistols. I sold my G21 and bought a Sig and haven't looked back.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 4:06:07 AM EST
I don't have one, but I think Sig is the best pistol around currently. I am also looking for a nice 226 trade in.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 4:23:26 AM EST
You need to go to Glocktalk and read some of the shooting techniques. Most people shoot low left due to the trigger system. You need to practice dry firing at home to get a good feel for the trigger. Remember to pull back slowly until the gun "surprise" fires. You also need to remember holding the trigger all the way back and slowly releasing it until it clicks then you have a hair trigger for your remaining shots. It is well worth learning the trigger.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 4:47:41 AM EST
I have shot a Glock before. I hated it. The trigger pull was ridiculously heavy. I shoot my Ruger P93 often and I love it. The first pull of the trigger is about as stiff as that of the glock which I shot when the hammer is down, however after the first one the pull is very light. I can handle the one hard pull, but not every time. As for reliability the Ruger is as good as it gets. I have never had it malfunction. I have seen it happen to a guy that I let shoot it, but I have had not problems. I the end I think that you should go with what works for you. That is all that counts.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 4:53:42 AM EST
Two weekends ago I took my father and my father in law to the range. My father in law had a brand new Rugar P89 and my father had a new Glock 19. Now I know the shooter makes most of the difference but my father was driving tacks with the 19 and my father in law had a very tough time keeping it on paper at about 25 yards. Both had never shot either gun before. I then shot the Rugar and was not as accurate as with my Glock, but I have practiced with the Glock so it was not a completely fair comparison.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 4:57:40 AM EST
Just a sec - your reserve unit shoots Browning Hi Powers? I was not aware that any US units ever used that pistol. Perhaps you are using the standard Beretta?
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 5:09:39 AM EST
OK take a deep breath. Slow down. Put some ammo in the Glock and shoot it a bunch. Everything will be ok. The Glocks are combat weapons and they are very accurate, you just need to shoot them to learn the trigger. Stuff as much finger into the trigger as you can get and as much ammo into the gun as your wallet can afford. It does take getting used to the safe action pull and the 2X4 grip. Shooting at targets is tougher than with a SIG or more conventional pistol you may be used to (Hi Power in reserves? Hmmm) until you get the necessary trigger time in. However, if you need a combat pistol to go bang it will work. Period. In mud. In snow. In sand. Underwater...use your imagination.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 5:15:41 AM EST
[b]Written by Ross: I have had the same experience with Glocks. They pointed high for me"[/b] Actually, the glock (as well as the 1911, the Beretta, and many others) is pointed ergonomically correct. The S&W is in fact pointed high. Do this experiment yourself. Take whatever hand gun you carry, close your eyes, get a good grip on the handgun, raise it as though to fire, and then open your eyes. With the Beretta, Glock, 1911, you'll be looking right down the sights. Do the same with the S&W and the barrel will be 5 or 6 degrees low. You have to bend your wrist to make it level. You are "used" to doing this, but it is not ergonomic. If you retrain yourself while using an ergonomically correct pistol, you'll always shoot better than using one that is not. Lay a 1911 on top of any Smith (Sigma excluded) and you can see that the angle between the grip and the barrel is more closed on the Smith.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 6:19:31 AM EST
Glocks suck! Sorry.. [rolleyes] Shitty: grips,looks,feel,sights et.al. To each his own. Baretta 96 Centurian duty weapon: nice lines, great sight picture with the Trilux sights, long 1st pull and short from there on , have never had a stoppage of any kind with any ammo ever used![smoke]
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 6:30:38 AM EST
Actually, the glock (as well as the 1911, the Beretta, and many others) is pointed ergonomically correct. The S&W is in fact pointed high. Do this experiment yourself. Take whatever hand gun you carry, close your eyes, get a good grip on the handgun, raise it as though to fire, and then open your eyes. With the Beretta, Glock, 1911, you'll be looking right down the sights. Do the same with the S&W and the barrel will be 5 or 6 degrees low. You have to bend your wrist to make it level. You are "used" to doing this, but it is not ergonomic. If you retrain yourself while using an ergonomically correct pistol, you'll always shoot better than using one that is not. Lay a 1911 on top of any Smith (Sigma excluded) and you can see that the angle between the grip and the barrel is more closed on the Smith.
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Sure, and lay a M1911 on top of a Glock. You'll notice the grip angle is quite different as well. The Glock (17deg grip angle) is the same as a Lugar. Yet you claim that the govt model and the Glock are going to naturally point in the same plane. Not for me at least. The very test you mentioned above is the one I performed years ago that convinced me to stick to Sigs. Everytime I tried it, the glock was pointing to the sky. Sure it could have been the 500rds+ per month I was shooting out of Sigs at the time (competeing in IDPA). But why relearn a whole new thing, when the one you have works fine. Incidentally, the M1911 points low when I do the eyes-closed test. The point is I personally don't like the way the gun handles and, for me at least, it points in the wrong place. As for S&W autos, I ditched them long before that. And I suppose I wasn't clear in that I was not posting ANYTHING about S&W autos and their pointing ability. I have no idea why you're asking me to compare the two. Nor do I care where a S&W points. If you reread my post, there is not one word about S&W autos. I've been able to retrain myself with nearly any firearm, and I had no doubt I could have done it with the Glock. The question though is why bother. If a Sig (of which I've owned 6) or a HK/USP (of which I've owned 4) point naturally for me in my current state of training, then why should I retrain all over again with a different gun just to point a Glock (of which I've owned two) "correctly". Again, I think Glocks are great guns. When people ask my advice on them, I tell them to try one out. If they like it, then they can't beat it really. Cost, durability, reliability, etc are all there. But I just don't like them. So I see no reason to own one myself, nor try to force myself to use one. I tried, I mean I really tried to like that gun. I carried the G-19 daily and shot it every two days for a month to try and like it. I never did. I sold it and I've never felt it was the wrong decision for me. I never felt poorly armed with a Glock, I just see no reason to own and shoot a gun I don't like. Ross
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 6:32:08 AM EST
I shoot a HS2000 it's a copy of a Glock and has the same trigger system and action as Glocks. I've only shot about 500 rds through it so I'm not to accurate but it has never jammed hit's the target looks cool and only cost me $300
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 6:37:34 AM EST
Just a sec - your reserve unit shoots Browning Hi Powers? I was not aware that any US units ever used that pistol. Perhaps you are using the standard Beretta?
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Folks- Signals is in CA for Canada, not CA for California. It is perfectly logical that his reserve unit would have the standard Canadian sidearm of the BHP. Ross
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 6:45:46 AM EST
I shot a Glock one time. In .40 S&W. 100 rounds and my wrist was almost too sore to drive home. Okay, I exaggerate. But 100 Rounds with my Sig 229, and I'm just getting warmed up. Reading this thread, I'm hearing "You'll love the Glock if you...." 1. Replace the sights. 2. replace the trigger 3. Learn the trigger 4. Learn how to point it. 5. get a different grip cover 6. Practice dry firing at home 7. Quit your job, and spend the next three years practicing with it and getting used to it. I took my Sig out of the box, and haven't changed a THING - either the guns configuration, or my shooting style. I suppose I could LEARN to like going to the dentist too, but WHY?????
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 6:46:11 AM EST
Hey Sportsmans Supply-[;)]
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 7:31:37 AM EST
I noticed the Glock 23 is harder on my wrists than my other 40's. You just have to give it some time. I find myself drawn to the Glocks more so than the HK's. When I bring my USP40C and 23 to the range, it's almost like I'm going through the motions with the USP. After a couple of mags, I find myself thinking, "Cool, now let's try the Glock". And I love the HK! I guess there's something to be said for consistent trigger pull. Anyway, afer a few hundred rounds you'll get the hang of the Glock. And the stock sights are like 4x4's. Since I added Trijicon's the sight picture is a little better.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 9:13:15 AM EST
Gee whiz, I can't believe what I'm hearing. The Glock in forty hurts your arm? I put 200 through my 22 and don't notice anything. But then again, I shoot my H&K 91 all day and think the recoil is moderate and others say how bad that bites? Mabye I have a low threshold for pain??? I loved my Glock right out of the box, damned accurate too. Sights and trigger are fine in my book. I can acquire and hit multiple targets faster than with a Beretta with double action trigger. Hey Ross, not picking on you, just putting in my 2 cents. I just really think of all the angles, S&W is just about the most out of align going. I love the feel of the Glock, Beretta, 1911, can't stand the S&W, and don't care for the Sig. I guess it's all just personal preference and anatomy (size and shape of hands).
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 9:32:06 AM EST
I bought a Glock a few years ago and practiced once or twice a week for about a year and just could not get that thing to shoot well for me. Went out and bought a Kimber polymer 1911 and the first five rounds I shot through it were better than my best day with the Glock. I mean, my 1911 may not look as bad as my glock but sheesh, it is way more accurate down range.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 9:38:01 AM EST
Put it in your draw with your socks and forget about it. Or send it to me [whacko]hehhe. Get a Heckler and koch USP. You get great accuracy and the stock sights work just fine. Very easyto control. Fun to shoot and you never have to worry about your finger slipping and hitting the safty on the triger of your glock again. That would hurt if you shot your foot or sumthing. I have nothing against SiG but HK is just plain better. Nothin beats german engineering in that catagory.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 9:44:36 AM EST
Brownings? When did this happen? I thought the official 9mm's for the army were the Berretta 92f(M-9) and the M-11 for C.I.D. How do you guys have Browning's unless they're 1911's?
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 9:51:20 AM EST
Brownings? When did this happen? I thought the official 9mm's for the army were the Berretta 92f(M-9) and the M-11 for C.I.D. How do you guys have Browning's unless they're 1911's?
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 9:51:43 AM EST
Usually I shot with Beretta 92FS (owned two...) and with Browning HP and Walther P99 and PPK. I am selling the P99 (money needed for my first AR style rifle...) so I was thinking wich kind of compact size, low price, reliable polymer frame pistol to replace the (wonderful) P99. I thought to Glock 19, but I was afraid of the trigger pull. My range had a Glock 19 for rent. Shot 50 rounds at 25 meters, two hands (Weaver I guess) style. I was amazed of how simple is to get accustomed to this little nasty pistol. I think that if I could (only after bringing home the AR15...) buy it, the Glock will be in my safe...LOADED!
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 10:04:12 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 10:12:14 AM EST
I currently own and shoot 10 different handguns on a regualr basis. I currently have pistols from Beretta, Walther, Glock, Smith & Wesson, Colt, Springfield Armory, Ruger and Sig Sauer. I can say with absolute certainty that the Glock is just as accurate and just as reliable (if not more so), than any other pistol I own. Anyone who bashes Glocks has simply not learned how to shoot one. It doesn't take a year or a fortune as one poster put it, it just takes a couple boxes of ammo and an afternoon. Yes, the Glock is different than most pistols but different is not bad. Out of all the pistols I've had over the years, if I had to pick only one to keep and carry for my safety and protection, it would be a Glock, without a doubt. Ease of cleaning, maintenance, and it's ultra simple and ultra reliable design make it an easy choice for me. YMMV of course. As for the accuracy issue that signals was so ticked about, I shoot IPSC with a Glock 22 and I do better with it than my fully tricked out 1911 which cost me almost 2 grand! Flame on!
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 10:14:32 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 10:44:48 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 11:41:21 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 11:53:14 AM EST
Originally Posted By Waldo: That's a place for cultists & fanatics.
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I'm sure some would say the same about here so does that make it true???
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:19:18 PM EST
Originally posted by whackem
The Glocks are combat weapons and they are very accurate......... However, if you need a combat pistol to go bang it will work. Period. In mud. In snow. In sand. Underwater...use your imagination.
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I have seen others refer to the Glock as a combat pistol. Not knocking, but what military uses a Glock? SEALs use Sigs because they found that the Glocks would not work when they came onto a beach after being underwater and the Sigs would. This is from several gunsmiths and a SEAL that I had the pleasure of talking to about a year ago. The standard issue U.S. military sidearm is a Beretta. I don't know of any military anywhere in the world that uses the Glock so where does combat pistol come from when referring to a Glock? GeoffM24, it is Ruger, not Rugar. I was at a range near Parris Island shooting my rifles and pistols. At the end of the day I starting shooting at a padded gong shaped target about 100 yards away and hitting it every time with my P89 and my P90 (I also have some Sigs). The range officer that Sunday was a Marine marksmanship instructor at Parris Island. He saw what I was doing and came down and asked if he could fire them. He was impressed with my 'cheap' Rugers (as some people like to call them) and said he liked them much better than their issue Berettas. I am no great shot, but the Rugers are far more accurate than you make them out to be.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:34:57 PM EST
Originally Posted By LARRY G: Originally posted by whackem
The Glocks are combat weapons and they are very accurate......... However, if you need a combat pistol to go bang it will work. Period. In mud. In snow. In sand. Underwater...use your imagination.
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I have seen others refer to the Glock as a combat pistol. Not knocking, but what military uses a Glock? SEALs use Sigs because they found that the Glocks would not work when they came onto a beach after being underwater and the Sigs would. This is from several gunsmiths and a SEAL that I had the pleasure of talking to about a year ago. The standard issue U.S. military sidearm is a Beretta. I don't know of any military anywhere in the world that uses the Glock so where does combat pistol come from when referring to a Glock? GeoffM24, it is Ruger, not Rugar. I was at a range near Parris Island shooting my rifles and pistols. At the end of the day I starting shooting at a padded gong shaped target about 100 yards away and hitting it every time with my P89 and my P90 (I also have some Sigs). The range officer that Sunday was a Marine marksmanship instructor at Parris Island. He saw what I was doing and came down and asked if he could fire them. He was impressed with my 'cheap' Rugers (as some people like to call them) and said he liked them much better than their issue Berettas. I am no great shot, but the Rugers are far more accurate than you make them out to be.
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Adopted by Austrian Army to replace Browning HP, by Israeli Army Sayerot (Special Forces)along with SIG P226 and 228.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:40:37 PM EST
HK for me, I've had many different pistols but the USP(in .45) fits my hand like a glove !!
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:42:29 PM EST
Reading this thread, I'm hearing "You'll love the Glock if you...." 1. Replace the sights. 2. replace the trigger 3. Learn the trigger 4. Learn how to point it. 5. get a different grip cover 6. Practice dry firing at home 7. Quit your job, and spend the next three years practicing with it and getting used to it.
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Yeah, replace the trigger and sights with the ones mounted on a different gun. Make sure the different gun points for you, feels right in your hand. All the practice in the world won't help if the gun doesn't fit. Glocks are blocky, bulky, top heavy. I can't stand the grip, makes my toes curl; it's just wrong, wrong, wrong. Trigger is creepy, squishy, mushy, bendy, funky. I have cheap giveaway ball-point pens with more positive feel to the action than a Glock trigger. I suppose I trust the trigger mechanism to be safe when it's "cocked," but I like a single/double action gun with a decocker. If you've given it some thought, understand what handguns are about and like the Glock anyway, more power to you. But I see too many shooters who think Glock is God's gift and haven't a clue. They're sold on the name and the sales hype. Same thing true of Kimbers. I own a Glock M-81 tactical knife. Not much good for anything except stabbing and slashing, but it's really good for stabbing and slashing. I'm still looking for the "perfect" CCW gun. I have three that work in different circumstances.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:46:07 PM EST
I've encountered the same issues your talking about. I owned one of the very first Glock 17's. It went back to the factory 3 times for wery strange reason not related to the discussion. I saw very serious safety issues with cadets in the Police Academy dealing with tactical reloads and rounds going off because cadets trying to get leverage on the mag release and jerking the trigger by accident. (Shooter issue more so / But also ergonomics issue of design) The Glock is a reliable and solid design though, but it must be said, there is no perfect pistol for everyone.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 12:50:15 PM EST
Originally posted by PaolaAR15
Adopted by Austrian Army to replace Browning HP, by Israeli Army Sayerot (Special Forces)along with SIG P226 and 228.
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Okay, that's two more than I thought. I stand corrected. However that's only two out of hundreds of armies.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 1:11:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By whackem: The Glocks are combat weapons and they are very accurate,
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Whackem, you make it sound like the phrase "combat weapon" is synonymous accuracy :) I really like Glock pistols; however, at least in the 9mm variation, I don't find them to be "very accurate" compared to other pistols. My question to Signals would be, "are you and your friends expecting too much from the weapon?" If you're expecting to drive tacks, the answer is definitely yes. Glocks are reasonably accurate and highly reliable combat pistols, not refined (and sometimes finicky) target pistols! Can you turn a Glock into a target pistol? Sure! But out of the box you're expecting a bit much :) I personally have done my best shooting (amongst reasonably priced 9mms) with a Hungarian copy of the Hi-Power. Furthermore, my Glock owning friends also shoot much better with this HP than with the Glock pistols. It's simply a matter of being a more accurate platform from the get go. (Single Action rules :) It has also been my experience that many people shoot the smaller Glock 19 better than the 17. YMMV
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 1:22:42 PM EST
O.K. I KNOW I'M A NEW GUY, BUT I JUST GOT TO SAY HEY SIGNALS! TAKE THE FUCKIN GUN AND SHOOT THE HELL OUT OF IT. ALTHOUGH I AM PARTIAL TO GLOCKS, IN REALITY IT DOES NOT MATTER WHAT YOU OWN, IF YOU LIKE IT AND THE DAMN THING WORKS FOR YA SHOOT THE MOTHER FUCKER AND SHOOT IT OFTEN, AND AFTER ALL IS SAID AND DONE, YOU DON'T LIKE THE DAMN THING GET RID OF IT ! OH YEAH "POWDERBURNS" I HOPE YOU ARE KIDDING CAUSE YA SOUND LIKE A PUSSY !
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 1:38:19 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 1:59:51 PM EST
BushPig, why are you yelling? Powderburns is a pussy because he speaks candidly about the Glock. Most of the things he said are true. I much prefer a 1911, BHP, or even a Beretta. Lest you think I am a pussy too, I'll say that because it's issued I carry a G-22 5-6 days a week. I can use it, even with the issue 3.5 trigger! Yes issue. But I don't prefer it.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 2:03:00 PM EST
Did'nt the Danish or Dutch army also adopy the Glock right after it was designed and released.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 2:08:51 PM EST
Browning Hi Power (especially a smithed MkIII in 40 S&W or 357 Sig) is fantastic. For Sigs...try out the Sig P220 with Hogue Grips. Also try out the 1911.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 2:28:49 PM EST
Well... guess I'm gonna have to throw in on this one and I will probably get jumped on but here goes. Let me preface this by stating that I have had a lifetime of experience with all types of weapons both personally and professionally. I have been and currently am a certified firearms instructor - and have taught civies and LEOs alike.... and so on, and so on...... Not trying to blow my own horn but just wanted all to know where I come from - ok? Let me say this up front - technically and in theory - if you line up the sights on any weapon [b]AND[/b] those sights on on target when the shot breaks [b]AND[/b] there is no camming or flinching, etc - then said round should impact the target at the intended spot. Now I know all about the way a particular weapon "points" in the shooter's hands and I realize that some shooters do better with certain weapons and not so well with others [b]BUT[/b] this is not the fault of the weapon AS LONG AS THE WEAPON SHOOTS TO POINT OF AIM. In other words - the sights are properly aligned on the gun so that the bullet goes where it is supposed to. OK? So my conclusion to this subject is this: You either decide that a particular weapon (in this case a Glock pistol) is worthy of your practice time. Will you spend the time to become proficient with that weapon or not? If not, then go trade it in on something that fits your style of shooting right out of the box. Otherwise - go to the range and keep puttin' burnt powder in the air until you can do what you want to do with your weapon of choice. No slam on you "Signals" but just like so many in our society these days, we are so quick to blame the machine instead of admitting operator error is much more likely the problem. Excepting that something mechanical is amiss with the pistola - then the problem is with what's behind the breech end of the weapon. [sniper] [b]The Sniper
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 3:58:47 PM EST
Originally Posted By PowderBurns:
Reading this thread, I'm hearing "You'll love the Glock if you...." 1. Replace the sights. 2. replace the trigger 3. Learn the trigger 4. Learn how to point it. 5. get a different grip cover 6. Practice dry firing at home 7. Quit your job, and spend the next three years practicing with it and getting used to it.
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Yeah, replace the trigger and sights with the ones mounted on a different gun. Make sure the different gun points for you, feels right in your hand. All the practice in the world won't help if the gun doesn't fit. Glocks are blocky, bulky, top heavy. I can't stand the grip, makes my toes curl; it's just wrong, wrong, wrong. Trigger is creepy, squishy, mushy, bendy, funky. I have cheap giveaway ball-point pens with more positive feel to the action than a Glock trigger. I suppose I trust the trigger mechanism to be safe when it's "cocked," but I like a single/double action gun with a decocker. If you've given it some thought, understand what handguns are about and like the Glock anyway, more power to you. But I see too many shooters who think Glock is God's gift and haven't a clue. They're sold on the name and the sales hype. Same thing true of Kimbers.
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1) The "original" sights are blocky, many people like them, I think night sights are a better setup on a carry handgun, day or night 2)Trigger springs are $2.00 a piece, not $60.00 plus gun-smithing like 1911's. THey are cheap and easily replaced. If you buy a used Glock the original owner may have a 12 lb spring in there. Point is easily replaced in about a miniute. 3) Learn the trigger? It's just like any other trigger, some "sensitive" types don't like the feel of the "trigger safety". 4) I had to learn to point 1911's, and my 4506. First time I picked up a Glock it pointed exactly where I was pointing. Experienced shooters get used to a certain grip angle so when they pick up a Glock with a different angel they often comment on the "pointing". The Glock, at least to me feel very natural. 5) $9.00 to improve the grip, your right if I had a 1911 it would be much easier to get extra checkering put on it and change the grips, get a different backstrap etc. The point is the Glock's were/are seen as lest customisable becuase the are polymer, that is wrong. The Glock is good whrn you get it and can be personalized. 6) Dry firing is a good way to practice as long as it is safe for the gun. Laser systems with dry firing are also available. PRACTICE makes perfect. 7) No If you had adult sized hands it wouldn't be a problem. Hmmm, the firing mechanism, kinda like a revolver?? Pull the trigger it goes bang, don't want that loud bangee sound DON"T PULL THE TRIGGER. I understand handguns, If you are caught in the "grandpa didn't need a GLock in the war to end all wers....." drivel more power to you. Glocks are competitively priced, reliable, easy to service, and accurate. A box stock Glock is more accurate than many other higher priced weapons. Parts relaibility, and interchangebility is outstanding. The fact that all the mags of any caliber will work in any Glock of that caliber, (As long as they are long enough, excludind G36), is a strong point of the Glock system.
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