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6/25/2017 7:35:25 PM
6/21/2017 8:25:40 PM
Posted: 6/3/2001 5:18:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:23:31 PM EDT
If it's sighted in for 25 METERS, it should be flat out to 300m
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:32:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/3/2001 5:30:25 PM EDT by Bryan_]
If I recall correctly, when I battle sight zeroed my M16 for the Marine Corps, we often did on reduced size targets at 30m because the round was climbing at 30m and would drop to the same level as it would be at 300m... I'd guess then that the round would actually hit a bit higher at 100m than it would at 25, so if you're zeroed for 100m you might hit a bit low at 25.
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:34:22 PM EDT
bullet drop on a .223 is, for all intents and purposes, nonexistant at 25 yards, and miniscule at 100... just shoot dead on and the rifle will be "minute of badguy" for farther than most people can shoot without optics.
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:34:59 PM EDT
It doesn't!
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:44:09 PM EDT
Dang......I was hoping for the guy who says it actually climbs.
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:48:57 PM EDT
You are correct, Bryan. Same rise/drop at 25/250, 30/300, etc. The ones we have at work are still rising at 150 yds.(Their apex is probably at the 175 mark)
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:50:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By RipMeyer: Dang......I was hoping for the guy who says it actually climbs.
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Most of the battle sighting methods would result in alittle climb.
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:55:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 5:59:41 PM EDT
Very good, Garand. You have proven and made public our misconceptions LOL. So much for us Nuke security guys being professional, huh?
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 9:27:53 PM EDT
Depends on the load and the barrel length. With a 100 yard zero, your rounds will hit several inches low at 25 yards from your point of aim.
Link Posted: 6/3/2001 10:21:14 PM EDT
hey phrigid..nuke security...AR.. you must be a guard out at ANO? been there a few times doing eddy current. how things going out there? i apologize if i am mistaken.
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 12:19:37 AM EDT
It has a ballistic arch when exiting the muzzle and traveling downrange. Bullet temporarily over comes the force of gravity, thus pulling away frum the earth(has to do with velocity/aerodynamics/lift). At o to 100 yds. it should be climbing. No physics whiz bang here, just what I got from the reading I've done on ballistics.Always need to learn more, hope I'm not wrong here for once.
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 12:55:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 6:02:40 AM EDT
So tell me then, when you are zeroed in at 100 yards, where will the bullet strike at a 200 yard target?? In other words, you aim high for a 25 yard target (when sighted in at 100) so where do you sight your 200 yrd. target?? :-]
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 7:50:49 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 8:56:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/4/2001 11:49:20 AM EDT by Garand_Shooter]
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 9:11:39 AM EDT
My ballistic calculator tells me that you should be 1.5" low at 25 yds to be dead on at 100. That's a sight 2.5" above the bore line and a 55gr at 3200fps. 62gr bullets will hit so close to this that you won't be able to derive the mean impact difference at 25yds from your groups.
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 9:56:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TacCar: It has a ballistic arch when exiting the muzzle and traveling downrange. Bullet temporarily over comes the force of gravity, thus pulling away frum the earth(has to do with velocity/aerodynamics/lift). At o to 100 yds. it should be climbing. No physics whiz bang here, just what I got from the reading I've done on ballistics.Always need to learn more, hope I'm not wrong here for once.
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Tell me, just how the hell does the bullet pull away from the earth? Any retard can tell you that there are no forces pushing a bullet up. The forces acting on a bullet are from behind (your gunpowder's gases), from the top (gravity) ond from the front (wind) and maybe wind from the sides. A bullet needs wings to create something called LIFT. Lift is what helps thing pull away from the earth. The only way your bullet will "pull away from the earth" is if you point it at the sky. Get a frigg'n physics book and stop beleiving everything you hear on the internet.
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 10:00:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/4/2001 9:59:15 AM EDT by Mr Spock]
...to continue, if you are in a perfect vacuum, barrel parallel to ground, the bullet will drop to the ground as fast as if you dropped it by hand. What in the world will cause it to arc up? Nothing! Garand Shooter is correct when he said it "appears" to arc because it crosses your sites twice.
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 11:10:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/4/2001 11:08:27 AM EDT by RipMeyer]
Originally Posted By RipMeyer: Dang......I was hoping for the guy who says it actually climbs.
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Like I said, I knew someone would say it. LOL
Link Posted: 6/4/2001 11:30:21 AM EDT
if you are in a perfect vacuum, barrel parallel to ground, the bullet will drop to the ground as fast as if you dropped it by hand.
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Exactly right. In a perfect situation (vaccum), gravity will cause any object (whether it is dropped or is travelling horizontal)to fall bact toward earth at exactly the same rate. Nothing will cause it to travel against gravity unless there is a force to do so (ie the barrel is pointed up). As Troy says, there seems to be a "climb" because the sights and the barrel are not on the same level and there is a slight upward pointing of the barrel to make them meet. The bullet does not climb at all....it leaves the barrel traveling slightly upward.
Link Posted: 6/5/2001 7:36:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TacCar: It has a ballistic arch when exiting the muzzle and traveling downrange. Bullet temporarily over comes the force of gravity, thus pulling away frum the earth(has to do with velocity/aerodynamics/lift). At o to 100 yds. it should be climbing. No physics whiz bang here, just what I got from the reading I've done on ballistics.Always need to learn more, hope I'm not wrong here for once.
View Quote
Ripmeyer, Here's your guy!!!LOL[rolleyes] BTW, if you could fire a bullet and drop a bullet at the same time, from the same height, in a vacuum, they would both hit the ground at the same time; i.e., the vertical and horizontal velocity vectors are independent of each other. [;)]
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