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Posted: 5/26/2001 10:57:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/26/2001 11:10:03 PM EDT
I live with my girlfriend and keep the shotgun w/ an empty chamber next to the bed at night. During the day it goes in the safe. Do you have a problem keeping the gun out while you are sleeping in bed? radioman
Link Posted: 5/26/2001 11:55:14 PM EDT
I don'have any children yet but I do have by brother's and sister's children in the house on weekends so I keep my shotgun inside the closet just above the door. It is not visible unless you stick your head in and look up and is high enough to keep it out of child's hand while easy for an adult to reach.
Link Posted: 5/26/2001 11:58:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By yobo: ...It is not visible unless you stick your head in and look up and is high enough to keep it out of child's hand while easy for an adult to reach.
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Are these kids big enough to slide a chair or stepladder to the closet? [red]PRK
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 12:24:59 AM EDT
The oldest is 3 1/2 yrs old now so I guess I would have to say no at this time. Also, there are no chairs or stepladder in my bedroom and the closest chairs are in the dining room and they weigh over 20 pounds each. Finally, I keep the door to the bedroom "latched" and closet locked when kids are over. I know nothing is perfect but this seems to work well for us... at least until they get older/bigger.
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 5:37:02 AM EDT
I have one! What I do is rack the 870 and then put in the #4 high brass rnds. Even if they see the shotgun, they will not be able to rack it to chamber a round unless they know how. The shotgun is out of the safe only if I am in the bedroom otherwise it is inside the safe
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 6:01:43 AM EDT
Most kids can figure it out. I know I could figure out almost any gun when I was a kid. I didn't mess with any of my dad's guns because I was taught not to. But I could work a M1911 easy enough, and I'm sure I could figure out an 870. Easily if I had ever seen anyone do it once, and eventually on my own if I hadn't. Child development is completely about figuring things out and how they work. It's a good idea to lock it up in some way. Maybe a combination of some of the systems here. I think a shotgun lock like that used in a police car. Mounted above the door inside the closet. The shotgun loaded, but no round chambered. This would allow you to use a key, so you're not fumbling with a combo at night, in the dark. It would be high enough up to keep it out of the normal "zone of control" of most youngsters. It would be chamber empty so at least they couldn't fire it accidentally while it's locked up. Keep the key on your house key rings and stick it in the lock at night. Then you wouldn't even have to fumble for those. It would also give you the added benifit of knowing where your keys were in the morning[:)] You would also be awake and alert enough to make decisions if you can get to the gun. Ross
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 6:02:05 AM EDT
You guys must sell crack out of the house! IT can"t be that bad.I hope.
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 6:26:12 AM EDT
I agree with you Ross. Nowadays, kids are so into figuring things out that Playstation Games do not come with instruction manuals unlike the Atari that I had when I was young. But for someone to figure things out, whether they be an adult or kid, they have to have the opportunity to do so. Which is exactly why I only I mentioned,[i][b] "The shotgun is out of the safe only if I am in the bedroom otherwise it is inside the safe"[/i][/b]. Besides, I take my kids to the range with me whenever I can so they are not ignorant about the potential for harm when it comes to guns. Teach them young and teach them well!
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 6:33:33 AM EDT
riddler thats a good idea.at least someone would have to take several more steps to load up .
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 6:50:10 AM EDT
Firepower, Whether it is that bad or not, I have personally experienced tragedy because of not being prepared. My dad was killed by punk kids who broke in our farmhouse hoping to steal some stuff they could sell for drugs. He was not prepared to deal with the situation since his gun was not within reach. I honestly hope and pray that this will not happen to anybody here. All I can say is just be prepared for you will never know when what happens. Take care and be safe. riddler
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 6:56:46 AM EDT
scooper, Practice, practice, practice and when you think that you have gotten to where it becomes one fluid motion, practice some more.
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 7:11:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 7:27:46 AM EDT
There is a product called the life jacket i think.It encloses the whole reciever and can be mounted to the wall.I have seen it in several magazines.
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 7:54:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Firepower: You guys must sell crack out of the house! IT can"t be that bad.I hope.
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Haha thats some funny shit man
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 7:56:44 AM EDT
Maybe you could make sure the kids wouldnt get at the guns if you put the gun in bed with you. [:)]
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 8:23:54 AM EDT
If children are present in your house, guns need to be under lock and key. It is the only way to be sure. Here’s a couple of wall safes, there is also a company that makes an under the bed pull out model that locks. Don’t remember the name, but have seen them on ebay. They also make versions for trucks and suvs. I think they all have some sort of quick action lock. [url]http://www.vlineind.com/AGEng/products_and_prices/Closet_Vault/closet_vault.html[/url] [url]http://www.gunlocker.com/rlocker.htm[/url] And before you tell me they cost to much, ask yourself this. What would it be worth not to have the death of a child on your hands? Or even more important what is your child’s safety and well being worth? For a locking rack, try police supply catalogues or stores. For these situations it’s hard to beat a hand gun, fast open security storage boxes are a lot cheaper and easier to conceal.
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 8:35:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Righteous Kill: If children are present in your house, guns need to be under lock and key. It is the only way to be sure. Here’s a couple of wall safes, there is also a company that makes an under the bed pull out model that locks. Don’t remember the name, but have seen them on ebay. They also make versions for trucks and suvs. I think they all have some sort of quick action lock. [url]http://www.vlineind.com/AGEng/products_and_prices/Closet_Vault/closet_vault.html[/url] [url]http://www.gunlocker.com/rlocker.htm[/url] And before you tell me they cost to much, ask yourself this. What would it be worth not to have the death of a child on your hands? Or even more important what is your child’s safety and well being worth? For a locking rack, try police supply catalogues or stores. For these situations it’s hard to beat a hand gun, fast open security storage boxes are a lot cheaper and easier to conceal.
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I installed the small gunlocker safe (see link above) by my bed where I keep my Glock 22 ready to go. I also installed the larger rifle locker in my closet to hold my long guns. I've only had them for a few months, but they're very well constructed and relatively easy to install as long as you can avoid plumbing and wiring in the wall where you're installing it.
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 9:16:25 AM EDT
Gloftoe, A buddy of mine got a bunch of used shotgun locks from the local PD. When they got their new cars the locks wouldn't fit, so they pitched them. I installed one in my bedroom with the button hidden (not from my children but their friends). If you want one email me and I'll see what I can do. John
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 9:39:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 9:45:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 10:44:51 AM EDT
I agree that a gun owner must be extra safe when there are children in the house hold. I have two kids (8 & 14) so here is what I have done. [b]First[/b] I have taught them about safety--I drill this into their heads religiously every week. [b]Second,[/b] I have always let my children handle any of my guns, and when I get a new firearm they are shown how to operate it. [b]Third[/b] I have taken my children out shooting so they can see first hand the destructive powers of a firearm. This has been the most benificial lesson, as they know 100% that they are not toys!!. [b]Forth[/b] All my firearms are kept locked up in the safe...except one. That one is my Sig P228 which I keep in a fanny pack hanging next to me on a bed rail. During the day the gun gets emptied and locked up. At night I unlock and load it, keeping it within reach of me. My kids know it is there and know to stay away from it. I also always keep a 4cell Mag light next to my bed. By letting my kids see/operate all of my guns, it takes away the curiousity factor. I also strongly support reviewing safety with them on a continual basis. My two children know how to operate and unload all of my firearms, they are tested on there operation everytime they handle any of them. I feel 100% safe with my guns and my children in the same house. Not only do I know that they treat them with the respect that they deserve, but I also know that my 14 yr old son has the knowledge to protect himself/family if the need would ever arrise. In short I guess it comes down to trust and communication with your kids. sgtar15
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 11:24:31 AM EDT
I think SGTAR15 has hit the nail on the head. More important than locking guns up is teaching childeren proper safetly, handling, use, and potential of firearms. If you destroy the "mystery" about them, they just become another one of dads tools. When I was growing up, my best friends dad had over 20 guns in an unlocked wooden/glass case. We never touched them, because we knew proper safety, and most importantly, that if we did touch them without his dad around we were dead meat. It is amazing how far a little education and discipline will go. Locking things away is one more step toward safety, but should not be relyed upon as the first line of defense. Kids can find keys, and punch codes until they find the one that works, then all that is left is education and discipline.
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 11:37:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Firepower: You guys must sell crack out of the house! IT can"t be that bad.I hope.
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Those are the words of a true victim.....
Link Posted: 5/27/2001 11:45:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sgtar15: I agree that a gun owner must be extra safe when there are children in the house hold. I have two kids (8 & 14) so here is what I have done. [b]First[/b] I have taught them about safety--I drill this into their heads religiously every week. [b]Second,[/b] I have always let my children handle any of my guns, and when I get a new firearm they are shown how to operate it. [b]Third[/b] I have taken my children out shooting so they can see first hand the destructive powers of a firearm. This has been the most benificial lesson, as they know 100% that they are not toys!!. [b]Forth[/b] All my firearms are kept locked up in the safe...except one. That one is my Sig P228 which I keep in a fanny pack hanging next to me on a bed rail. During the day the gun gets emptied and locked up. At night I unlock and load it, keeping it within reach of me. My kids know it is there and know to stay away from it. I also always keep a 4cell Mag light next to my bed. By letting my kids see/operate all of my guns, it takes away the curiousity factor. I also strongly support reviewing safety with them on a continual basis. My two children know how to operate and unload all of my firearms, they are tested on there operation everytime they handle any of them. I feel 100% safe with my guns and my children in the same house. Not only do I know that they treat them with the respect that they deserve, but I also know that my 14 yr old son has the knowledge to protect himself/family if the need would ever arrise. In short I guess it comes down to trust and communication with your kids. sgtar
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What he said, with one caveat: I let my 6 yr old take a pop with my bedside gun (Mossberg 500) and it kicked the snot out of him. He no longer wants to monkey with it. I grew up in a house full of loaded guns, and I knew what would happen if a fooled around with one without Dad. Training prevents accidents....
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