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Posted: 10/6/2013 5:09:41 AM EST
Worth the money, or stick with stock air truck air filter?




Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:10:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By dbmers:
Worth the money, or stick with stock air truck air filter?




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Worthless
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:10:43 AM EST
Without a programmer to get the gains, it is a waste of money.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:11:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By dbmers:
Worth the money, or stick with stock air truck air filter?

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Depends on how much modding you plan to do. Intake / Exhaust / maybe a chip? Sure, why not.

Also, a better flowing intake can get you better gas mileage.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:11:59 AM EST
Worth it
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:12:15 AM EST
Mine runs 15-20 degrees cooler than stock. Is that worth anything? Who the hell knows - I'm in stop and go traffic most of the time.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:13:05 AM EST
It depends on the vehicle.

My Duramax benefits from an open exhaust and CAI, combined with a few other tweaks.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:14:23 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bud:
It depends on the vehicle.

My Duramax benefits from an open exhaust and CAI, combined with a few other tweaks.
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Yup! Between intake and tune the Mustangs can pick up 20-30rwhp.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:14:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 5:20:16 AM EST by RedDane]
Originally Posted By dbmers:
Worth the money, or stick with stock air truck air filter?




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No they aren't worthless.

In fact they are essential if you run a naturally aspirated race car motor.

You will see modest gains in HP (5-10 depending on speed and RPM) and increased throttle response. That's for a 4 banger, other engines will see more.

The key is to get a true CAI that feeds directly at the front instead of one that sits open inside of the engine bay without any protection. You can find some that have an aluminum wall around them but your best bet is to get one that sits directly at the front so that the cold air can make a difference.

Think of it as the equivalent of an intercooler for a turbo.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:16:23 AM EST
nice noise maker, looks cool from the engine bay - but it might let in more contaminants in your sensors and into the engine.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:19:10 AM EST
I had a 4.7L Dodge Ram that got better gas mileage with one.

Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:19:24 AM EST
If you're going to get a CAI.. get it done right. Don't purchase some pep boys bullshit from Autozone. Otherwise ArmoredSaint is right and you'll let a stream of particulates into your engine that will shorten its life and cause havoc.

If you were racing a small sports car I'd recommend a 400.00 Jackson Racing CAI but seeing as you are driving a truck I just don't know.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:19:42 AM EST
04 Tundra. Just got new tires, shocks/struts, brakes, plugs......next is timing belt/water pump. Just updating everything, so I can keep it running decent. Saw the cold air intakes while browsing parts websites, and was curious.






Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:22:21 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By armoredsaint:
nice noise maker, looks cool from the engine bay - but it might let in more contaminants in your sensors and into the engine.
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That's why there is a big filter on the end, to filter out the contaminates.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:24:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 5:26:54 AM EST by Luchs]
Depends what sort of engine. Some truck engines may not benefit too much from it. Removing the "family car" desresonating airbox from any vehicle made by Honda, putting on a short-pipe intake with a big filter and also changing out the header for a better flow really lets the engine breathe. Power and mileage will increase, at least it did for me. Jackson Racing is good, Weapon-R used to be good, don't know about now. NOTHING from Autozone, none of that AEM stuff, it's all junk.

If you can get one that goes into a "cooler" air space like the void behind a battery, near a fender well or the like, that's good enough. I would not recommend the kind that goes all the way around and down low to the grille. If you ever hit deep water, the "bypass" is useless, and hydrolocking your engine sucks. No pun intended.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:24:36 AM EST
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:27:22 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:27:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dbmers:
04 Tundra. Just got new tires, shocks/struts, brakes, plugs......next is timing belt/water pump. Just updating everything, so I can keep it running decent. Saw the cold air intakes while browsing parts websites, and was curious.






View Quote


Best I understand it, gains are engine specific. Generally speaking, CAI' s work best when pared with freer flowing exhaust (chip/tuning is optional).

I agree with the others, don't slap some AutoZone pos on it. Do your research...lots of unverified claims out there.


I looked at one year's ago for my jeep. In the end I opted not to. Jeep sees trail time and I didn't want to risk sucking water or mud into the intake. Not to mention, gains on the I6 were minimal for the cost.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:28:18 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hero2three:


That's why there is a big filter on the end, to filter out the contaminates.
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Originally Posted By hero2three:
Originally Posted By armoredsaint:
nice noise maker, looks cool from the engine bay - but it might let in more contaminants in your sensors and into the engine.


That's why there is a big filter on the end, to filter out the contaminates.


That filter most times does not filter the smaller particles of dirt.
also the lack of box and ducting that is also there to make it harder for the particles to even get to the filter does not help.
And the oil used on the filters ten to contaminate the MAF sensor and then will make it read wrong and screw with Your fuel trims.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:28:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.
View Quote

Cars are mainly engineered for durability and comfort, not speed. Same with engines.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:28:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 5:31:08 AM EST by Luchs]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.
View Quote


You don't get gearheads. The fun is TAKING an ordinary car you can afford to pay cash for and making it into an off-the-line-launching sleeper.

Oh, and manufacturers go for the bottom line. Honda four cylinders come with a 4:1 cast iron header with turbulent flow because it's CHEAP. Replace it with a DC Sports steel/ceramic coated 4:2:1 and you'll smooth out exhaust flow quite a bit.

Do you also buy an AR pattern rifle and do absolutely nothing to it to improve it?
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:30:19 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 5:34:37 AM EST by garbageman]
My brother installed a K&N air filter on our 2001 Damon Intruder 37' RV. Claims the mileage went from 7 to 10 mpg. Since I would never drive that gas hog cross country, local weekend trips only, I will never notice the difference. He on the other hand takes it down to NOLA towing a boat each year.

ETA: I have a CAI on my 02 Grand Prix GTP along with a smaller pulley on the blower, resonator deleted, larger downpipe, wrapped crossover pipe, aftermarket front exhaust manifold and a reprogrammed computer. The car puts down 240hp at the wheels. Not a huge power maker but it does surprise a few people being a four door brown (technically bronze mist) family car. Ask the guy in the Porsche SUV that got spanked
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:35:32 AM EST
Mfg's also have to deal with noise, and emissions. An aftermarket intake will be loduer, and as you may notice, OEM engineers made intakes to be quiet.

That said, if you mod the in, you need to mod the out. For a Tundra \, exhaust will be the best first mod, before an intake.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:36:12 AM EST
In my opinion, if it is a stock naturally aspirated engine it's a waste of money. On the other hand if it is a stock forced induction engine, you will see some gains.

My butt dyno tells me that my tuned turbo 4 banger makes more power/torque with a K&N kit.

Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:36:53 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.
View Quote


You so silly.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:37:01 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Luchs:

Do you also buy an AR pattern rifle and do absolutely nothing to it to improve it?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Luchs:
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.

Do you also buy an AR pattern rifle and do absolutely nothing to it to improve it?

Yes, But I buy KAC rifles.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:42:23 AM EST
What does your factory system look like, OP?

If it has restrictive baffles and is taking in hot air from the engine compartment, then yes, a good cold air induction system can be a worthwhile upgrade.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:42:36 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.
View Quote


Considering that quite a few of those millions are aimed at NVH reductions, I don't think CAI manufacturers neccesarily have more knowledge, but I know they apply it differently, on some models by some manufacturers to good effect.

Your vehicle most likely has many pounds of noise reducing tar like shit, and dense foams, under the carpet, in the doors and other panels, it is detrimental to performance even if only moderately, but the manufacturer decided to forgo fuel economy, handling, and acceleration so you could better hold a conversation, hear Beethoven, or just not get a headache, because most consumers prefer that, not all do. OEM air intakes are a balance of performance, economy, and reduced NVH, generally skewed heavily to the reduction of noise over the other two.

But is a CAI worth it for most people, no, most people will never be competitive on a track, the possible fractions of a second reduced acceleration times will never matter on the road, and most of us lack the self control to ever see improved fuel economy numbers. But hey, they look cool, and sound good on most rigs, so if it floats your boat why not?

FWIW I put one on my truck because the millions of dollars FoMoCo spent designing my air intake evidently didn't include making it stay snapped together, my aftermarket one hasn't come apart in 2X the miles
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:47:51 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 5:49:20 AM EST by cthulhu]
It really depends on what it is going on, and what else you are doing to it. You might get a little bit just with an intake kit, just to have cold air, and less winding passages to pass through, but it will be a necessity if you have matched mods throughout to increase flow. It does no good to get all the air in the world into an intake if you can't get it through the throttle body, through the motor, and out the exhaust in a similar volume, and get fuel to match the increased airflow.

(Unless of course you compress it :) )
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:50:56 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.
View Quote



Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:53:41 AM EST
At WOT, you might have some benefit, but I never drive at those power levels any more. I prefer to spend money on things other than fuel, tires, and blown engines.

Link Posted: 10/6/2013 5:54:36 AM EST
Depends on what car...
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:05:02 AM EST
Got one on my Suburban and yes worth it.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:05:30 AM EST
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Originally Posted By AmericanSoldier1989:



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Originally Posted By AmericanSoldier1989:
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.





He's got a point. He's clearly not a hotrodder, but he has a point.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:06:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By dbmers:
Worth the money, or stick with stock air truck air filter?




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Depends on the application. It probably requires software to get any real gain since the ECU will compensate for increased flow/density and negate the purpose. Some folks value the increased intake noise though.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:09:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 6:11:09 AM EST by Luchs]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dillehayd:



Depends on the application. It probably requires software to get any real gain since the ECU will compensate for increased flow/density and negate the purpose. Some folks value the increased intake noise though.
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Originally Posted By dillehayd:
Originally Posted By dbmers:
Worth the money, or stick with stock air truck air filter?







Depends on the application. It probably requires software to get any real gain since the ECU will compensate for increased flow/density and negate the purpose. Some folks value the increased intake noise though.


Depends on the ECU. I can only speak for Hondas, If you reset it to learn mode, it'll drive rough for a short while, then learn "Aha! I can breathe better!"...but won't go mixture insanely rich. Colder air from closer to the fenderwell is always better than hot engine compartment air, and mileage doesn't drop unless you floor it often because you like the sound. It's helpful to have an OBD interface that can log data to your smartphone or another device.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:11:04 AM EST
Depends on the vehicle.
I put one on my Pontiac Solstice normally aspirated 2.4L and it did nothing but increase the engine noise.
Then I got a little more performance by installing a high flow cat and performance muffler.
More increased performance by installing a performance tune ECU.
But all of those changes were still minimal performance increase.
Then I installed an aftermarket turbo charger and the car was then a totally new critter.

From my experience, on a normally aspirated daily driver, just installing a CAI is a worthless waste of money.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:15:03 AM EST
It should also be added that in order to see the full benefits of a cold air induction system, the outside air temperature should be somewhat cool and not 95 degrees.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:16:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 7:48:14 AM EST by drfcolt]
I put a K&N on my push mower and cut the grass in half the usual time .............................

Actually, I had a K&N on a Dodge SRT-10 P/U - didn't notice any improvement in performance or gas mileage - did sound pretty good, though ......
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:17:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2013 6:25:19 AM EST by diesel1]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:


That filter most times does not filter the smaller particles of dirt.
also the lack of box and ducting that is also there to make it harder for the particles to even get to the filter does not help.
And the oil used on the filters ten to contaminate the MAF sensor and then will make it read wrong and screw with Your fuel trims.
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Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Originally Posted By hero2three:
Originally Posted By armoredsaint:
nice noise maker, looks cool from the engine bay - but it might let in more contaminants in your sensors and into the engine.


That's why there is a big filter on the end, to filter out the contaminates.


That filter most times does not filter the smaller particles of dirt.
also the lack of box and ducting that is also there to make it harder for the particles to even get to the filter does not help.
And the oil used on the filters ten to contaminate the MAF sensor and then will make it read wrong and screw with Your fuel trims.


What they said +87. I am an engineer for a major transportation provider. The only way to get more air flow is to decrease restriction, either by increasing the surface area of the filter (check out the dual "breathers" on some big rigs) or a coarser filter media, which allows more dirt in. Even a 1% difference in filter efficiency is a handful of dirt in a filter test cycle. You will potentially get more power but at the cost of less engine life.

ETA: surprise, a slightly dirty filter is actually more efficient (filter efficiency is the % of dirt removed) than a clean filter. A filter needs a coating of dirt to achieve maximum efficiency. All those quick oil change place that try to sell air filters with every oil change are no doing anyone good. I spend a lot of time educating the mechanics at work on changing filters based on restriction, not appearance or mileage. Most diesel trucks and off-road equipment, like my Bobcat, have restriction indicators.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:18:37 AM EST
Honestly gains from a CAI depend on the vehicle and how convoluted the stock intake airflow path is. On a Mustang that usually have straight paths to the intake and no atmosphere adders before the intake manifold, you might see no gain at all. But on a car like the Mazdaspeed 3 I had that was Turbocharged and a labyrinth for an intake path I gained good horsepower with the installation of a CAI as my only mod. With no other changes I gained about 25 peak horsepower and an average of about 21 all the way across the RPM range. These gains were measured on the same dyno in similar atmospheric conditions. Baseline max was 242hp at the wheels. W/ CAI 268hp at the wheels. So it all depends on who is designing the intake system for the factory.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:20:23 AM EST
The people who benefit most from cold air intakes are the companies that make and sell them.

For most other people, it's an expense without a significant benefit.

Of course there will be exceptions.


I say, if you're really after horsepower gains, you'll want to do a LOT more than just put in a CAI.

Speed costs money. How fast can you afford to go?

Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:28:46 AM EST
depends on the car
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:28:52 AM EST
the biggest restriction in the intake path is the throttle blade. remove that for an instant increase in power!!!!!!!!!!

seriously though, the only benefit of having a free flowing intake is at wide open throttle, and even that is up for debate.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:33:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CROWDLG:
Do You think the millions of $ of engineering of the manufacturer who built the car is not better than the knowledge of the cold air intake co.?

Also If it's not fast enough stock, You bought the wrong car.
View Quote


Engineered with different goals in mind.

Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:36:44 AM EST
I know for the newer tundras they are worthless unless its the TRD version. Somehow those Toyota guys who designed the engine also designed the best CAI for it. Go figure..

Go check TundraTalk or TundraSolutions.

Hundreds of people have done it or asked that same question.

You will probably get the best price from Sparks. I get a lot of my stuff from them. They have good pricing and shipping costs.

Link Posted: 10/6/2013 6:45:13 AM EST
For anyone to say an aftermarket CAI is pointless is just uneducated babble. Are gains minimal? Yes, but when combined with a tuner or even dual exhaust its great. Even just a decent CAI can add MPG's and increase horsepower and torque. If you know about AR's stick to it, if you know horses, stick to that. If you don't know dick about cars....shut your mouth or put in those magical words..."In my opinion" or for those more lazy like myself you can use IMHO.

IMHO I would suggest only using a closed box design. They are more expensive, but are the best in the CAI category without a doubt after months of lurking and research I just ordered a S&B intake for my 5.7 12 Ram Sport. You may google a forum for your vehicle and see what everyone likes on theirs. On my last truck a CAI was my first addition and it was a cheaper one. I believe it was $150 for a Spectre brand open air one and I could feel a difference in my ass when I hit the gas. Obviously I am doing it again, but this time I am doing it right and going S&B.

There are a few other closed box CAI, but check some truck forums and see what others like on their trucks.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 7:01:24 AM EST
I am getting one for my ecoboost ford so I can get that cool turbo whistle, and possibly a little BOV sound.

The ability to do ricer blowoff fly by's is money well spent.

Don't hate...
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 7:07:32 AM EST
You will see some gains and maybe feel a difference but IMO I wouldn't spend the money unless you were doing some other mods to the vehicle. A great example I was going to do a Head and cam swap, kooks Long tubes headers and a CAI intake probably with a fast 90 intake and then a 200 shot of Nitrous with a water methanol injection(so I could then put a sts turbo on her and drop the bottle). well I hit some crap on the hwy in a turn and then slid into a 18 wheeler and totaled her.



So the point is that if I were you I wouldn't get the cai unless I was doing more mods after. Unless you have one of those weird vehicles that has a really restrictive intake and can see like a 30 hp gain.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 7:08:25 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TZLVredmist:
I am getting one for my ecoboost ford so I can get that cool turbo whistle, and possibly a little BOV sound.

The ability to do ricer blowoff fly by's is money well spent.

Don't hate...
View Quote


this is a good example, on the ecoboost a intake and an exhaust with some tuning can get you some really good gains. On my 5.7 hemi not so much.
Link Posted: 10/6/2013 7:10:57 AM EST
I had a K&N on my Silverado and could tell the different when towing, since it would not shift down as often. I did get a little bit better gas mileage also. It was really noisy and I read a lot of articles about CAI filters letting more dirt into the engine, so I took it off. I think if you ask 10 different people you are going to get different answers.
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