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Posted: 9/16/2013 11:34:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:35:52 AM EDT
I thought floor underlayment was MDF?

If you plan on having lots of foot traffic and there is a chance the underlayment could get wet I'd go with plywood.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:37:14 AM EDT
My house has OSB subfloor, for what it's worth.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:39:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:42:15 AM EDT
There is a 3/4 OSB product that is waterproof. It is intended for use on floors. I do not recall the brand, but I have sen it at Lowes or HD in the past, it isn't difficult to find, and not much if any more expensive than the swell-up-when-wet stuff.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:44:38 AM EDT
Look into advantech. Its is like osb with some kind of coating that makes it water resistant. They use it in residential flooring, boats and trailers.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:48:28 AM EDT
The make a T&G OSB for sub-flooring

It's used around here a lot.

just like anything else it has its pro's and con's
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:49:46 AM EDT
Don't be cheap, use plywood.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:50:48 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:52:19 AM EDT
Kilz oil based will seal in the smells
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:53:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:54:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:55:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:56:41 AM EDT
Tile?

Consider DUROCK
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:57:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:59:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 11:59:28 AM EDT
Originally Posted By icex:
We're opening up a retail shop in the next few months. I've been given a building that we can remodel and use. I need to re floor the building. It's not big (16ft wide 8 ft long I think) and was wondering if OSB would be ok for flooring. We're planning on putting down vinyl tile (the sticky kind from lowes) after the flooring is finished.

I've read mixed opinions: some say OSB is ok, but plywood is highly recommended. Any thoughts on using osb for flooring? At $37 a sheet for plywood, it's eating up our budget quick. OSB is a lot cheaper, but is it sturdy?
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16'x8'? That's not a building, it's a room.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:00:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2013 12:02:02 PM EDT by nicholasgentges]
plywood is better than osb by your dimensions it would only take 4 4x8 sheets I would just go with Advantech tong and groove and be done.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:02:19 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By nicholasgentges:
plywood is better than osb by your dimensions it would only take 4 4x8 sheets I would just go with plywood tong and groove and be done.
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One thing to keep in mind, the 4x8 sheets with tongue-n-groove will not be 4feet wide when you have put the tongue in the groove. Ask me how I know
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:02:55 PM EDT
osb on floors

hell no

plywood all the way

osb sucks on floors

carpenter here for many years

osb does not hold up
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:03:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:07:38 PM EDT
OSB is about all I see used for sub-floor around here. My own home however, has plywood sub-floor.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:09:34 PM EDT
3/4" T&G OSB is pretty standard for floors around here. Generally, a decent company will glue it to the joists to prevent squeaking.
It's fine. Hell, i used it on for floating floor when I expanded my retail shop. Part of it I carpeted, and the rest I put sticky tile right on top of.

3 year later and someone else is leasing the building and using it now

I only see the better custom builders using real plywood for floors.



Speed
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:10:09 PM EDT
Not a fan of OSB.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:10:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:11:04 PM EDT
As long as it's thick enough and not the 7/16th decking type, I would think so.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:12:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2013 12:37:14 PM EDT by Holden_McRoyne]
Originally Posted By icex:
We're opening up a retail shop in the next few months. I've been given a building that we can remodel and use. I need to re floor the building. It's not big (16ft wide 8 ft long I think) and was wondering if OSB would be ok for flooring. We're planning on putting down vinyl tile (the sticky kind from lowes) after the flooring is finished.

I've read mixed opinions: some say OSB is ok, but plywood is highly recommended. Any thoughts on using osb for flooring? At $37 a sheet for plywood, it's eating up our budget quick. OSB is a lot cheaper, but is it sturdy?
View Quote

What's your price for OSB? Home Depot shows 23/32 OSB flooring at $23.65/sheet. For a 16x8 building, you're only going to need 4 sheets. How bad do you want to save $56?
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:12:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2013 12:14:02 PM EDT by tcrpe]
Has a single person here asked the OP how this sheathing will be supported or what loads it will be supporting?

That would be "sheeting" in carpenter-ese.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:12:57 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By icex:


Did you have any problem putting the sticky tile over it?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By icex:
Originally Posted By speedracer422:
3/4" T&G OSB is pretty standard for floors around here. Generally, a decent company will glue it to the joists to prevent squeaking.
It's fine. Hell, i used it on for floating floor when I expanded my retail shop. Part of it I carpeted, and the rest I put sticky tile right on top of.

3 year later and someone else is leasing the building and using it now

I only see the better custom builders using real plywood for floors.



Speed


Did you have any problem putting the sticky tile over it?

Nope. I've done it several times.
For some reason, the really cheap sticky tiles seem to stick better to OSB than the nicer Armstrong ones.

Fine the clearance $0.28/piece ones at Home Depot and stick away


Speed
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:13:45 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
I wouldn't use it if you gave it to me. Every few years the breathless cries of "But it's been improved--this stuff isn't crappy like the old stuff!" comes up. Same shit, different iteration. Still shitty.

That said, if you are renting, use it. If you own the building, or otherwise don't want to put up with the problems inherent in it, use plywood, preferably 3/4" tongue-and-groove fir.
View Quote




OSB has no structural integrity whatsoever. Plywood does. Couple that with the fact that once it gets wet it essentially turns into sawdust(it's basically sawdust and glue) and you get the idea.


20 years exp.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:13:54 PM EDT
look for the 1" tounge and groove stuff...sturdy and maybe less expensive.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:16:58 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:17:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2013 12:20:05 PM EDT by dhmjr40]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jdessell:




OSB has no structural integrity whatsoever. Plywood does. Couple that with the fact that once it gets wet it essentially turns into sawdust(it's basically sawdust and glue) and you get the idea.


20 years exp.
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Originally Posted By jdessell:
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
I wouldn't use it if you gave it to me. Every few years the breathless cries of "But it's been improved--this stuff isn't crappy like the old stuff!" comes up. Same shit, different iteration. Still shitty.

That said, if you are renting, use it. If you own the building, or otherwise don't want to put up with the problems inherent in it, use plywood, preferably 3/4" tongue-and-groove fir.




OSB has no structural integrity whatsoever. Plywood does. Couple that with the fact that once it gets wet it essentially turns into sawdust(it's basically sawdust and glue) and you get the idea.


20 years exp.


I think he's talking about what I'd call "particle board." Looks like a bunch of wood chips glued together. What you're talking about sounds like MDF.......nope, wouldn't ;have it. Just finished ripping bunch of it out of my house and replaced it with 3/4 BC because of the sawdust factor.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:24:20 PM EDT
Who has two thumbs and had AdvanTech replace a $25k wood floor on a house they built?
This guy!!!

Long story short, we installed 3,000 s.f. of AdvanTech for the first time after using 3/4" T&G plywood for 30 years at the request of our Supplier and AdvanTech Rep.
It was dried in well under the advertised exposure time, but still showed swelling on all edges. The Flooring installer sanded it down before floor installation, and the joints telegraphed into the hardwood a few months after completion.
AdvanTech paid to remove the floor, skim the AdvanTech with 1/2" plywood and trim all doors and install a new floor to the tune of close to $40k.

Needless to say, we've gone back to using 3/4" T&G plywood.

OSB = Old Shitty Board


Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:27:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:28:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:30:44 PM EDT
Part of any competent design is moisture control.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:32:10 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:

Particle board is truly sawdust and glue--and would never be used for a floor. It makes nice table tops for radial arm saws, and perhaps a few other things, as it is nice and straight, and has a more or less "perfect" finish.

OSB is also called "chip board" as it is shredded wood chips. Some chips are quite large, and all are much larger than saw dust.
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Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
Originally Posted By dhmjr40:
Originally Posted By jdessell:
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
I wouldn't use it if you gave it to me. Every few years the breathless cries of "But it's been improved--this stuff isn't crappy like the old stuff!" comes up. Same shit, different iteration. Still shitty.

That said, if you are renting, use it. If you own the building, or otherwise don't want to put up with the problems inherent in it, use plywood, preferably 3/4" tongue-and-groove fir.




OSB has no structural integrity whatsoever. Plywood does. Couple that with the fact that once it gets wet it essentially turns into sawdust(it's basically sawdust and glue) and you get the idea.


20 years exp.


I think he's talking about what I'd call "particle board." Looks like a bunch of wood chips glued together. What you're talking about sounds like MDF.......nope, wouldn't ;have it. Just finished ripping bunch of it out of my house and replaced it with 3/4 BC because of the sawdust factor.

Particle board is truly sawdust and glue--and would never be used for a floor. It makes nice table tops for radial arm saws, and perhaps a few other things, as it is nice and straight, and has a more or less "perfect" finish.

OSB is also called "chip board" as it is shredded wood chips. Some chips are quite large, and all are much larger than saw dust.


You're right. Meant to say Wafer Board. Might be a regional thing
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:33:54 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By icex:


That's true, we'll have a 300 pound printer on it along with a 500 pound laminator
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By icex:
Originally Posted By jdessell:
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
I wouldn't use it if you gave it to me. Every few years the breathless cries of "But it's been improved--this stuff isn't crappy like the old stuff!" comes up. Same shit, different iteration. Still shitty.

That said, if you are renting, use it. If you own the building, or otherwise don't want to put up with the problems inherent in it, use plywood, preferably 3/4" tongue-and-groove fir.




OSB has no structural integrity whatsoever. Plywood does. Couple that with the fact that once it gets wet it essentially turns into sawdust(it's basically sawdust and glue) and you get the idea.


20 years exp.


That's true, we'll have a 300 pound printer on it along with a 500 pound laminator

3/4" OSB will be just fine...you're over-thinking this

If you were building a house to retire in, you'd want to go with plywood.
For office/retail space, you shouldn't have any issues w/ OSB, provided you are putting it on 16" OC joists


Speed
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:36:06 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By texinteg:
Look into advantech. Its is like osb with some kind of coating that makes it water resistant. They use it in residential flooring, boats and trailers.
View Quote



This. It can get soaking wet and not come apart. It is heavier than crap.

Good stuff.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:48:04 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bpricedo:



This. It can get soaking wet and not comes apart. It is heavier than crap.

Good stuff.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bpricedo:
Originally Posted By texinteg:
Look into advantech. Its is like osb with some kind of coating that makes it water resistant. They use it in residential flooring, boats and trailers.



This. It can get soaking wet and not comes apart. It is heavier than crap.

Good stuff.


I fixed your post.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:54:18 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:


I fixed your post.
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Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By bpricedo:
Originally Posted By texinteg:
Look into advantech. Its is like osb with some kind of coating that makes it water resistant. They use it in residential flooring, boats and trailers.



This. It can get soaking wet and not comes apart. It is heavier than crap.

Good stuff.


I fixed your post.



You've had Advantech come apart from moisture? It has a lifetime warranty, how was the damage handled?

Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:54:38 PM EDT
You'll want something smooth under your cheap vinyl peel and sticks. They telegraph everything underneath them and they don't adhere well to rough surfaces.

At my big-box store, 3/4" BCX is $3 more per sheet than OSB. You need 4 sheets. Your budget can't handle $12?
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 12:56:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2013 12:58:49 PM EDT by Disintegr8or]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bpricedo:



You've had Advantech come apart from moisture? It has a lifetime warranty, how was the damage handled?

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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bpricedo:
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By bpricedo:
Originally Posted By texinteg:
Look into advantech. Its is like osb with some kind of coating that makes it water resistant. They use it in residential flooring, boats and trailers.



This. It can get soaking wet and not comes apart. It is heavier than crap.

Good stuff.


I fixed your post.



You've had Advantech come apart from moisture? It has a lifetime warranty, how was the damage handled?

Look up 8 posts. It didn't come apart, the joints swelled up and telegraphed into the finish flooring.

Also, a 3' hip jack truss was dropped from the top of the 10' wall during framing, and the tail went all the way through the floor up to the bird mouth.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 2:09:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 2:12:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2013 2:14:16 PM EDT by ToledoXJ]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By stre-tch:
The make a T&G OSB for sub-flooring

It's used around here a lot.

just like anything else it has its pro's and con's
View Quote



All the homes I framed used 3/4" T n G decking. If you can avoid it getting rained on that is optimal but even if you do get it wet it does dry out.
Very common in Ohio. My issue with OSB is the smell it emits. My dad's house has fabricated OSB I beams for floor joists and the smell is over powering even after he drywalled the basement ceiling
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 2:21:32 PM EDT
How much will your budget be affected when you have to shut down your business to replace the OSB you put in there?
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 2:21:38 PM EDT
OSB sucks.

Use plywood and save in the long run.

My mother had a house built with OSB flooring and we got in a huge argument about upgrading to plywood.
She refused to pony up and 3 years after the house was finished the floors were creaking and nails were pulling up and into the underlay of the carpet.

Cheap crap.
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 2:32:51 PM EDT
You are opening a business and complaining about the cost of a few sheets of plywood
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 3:54:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/16/2013 3:55:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2013 3:56:18 PM EDT by MK4Mod0]
They had OSB in the floors in the apartment we lived in years ago.
If gave out in the high traffic areas and had to be replaced with regular plywood!
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