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1/14/2017 8:11:35 PM
Posted: 6/17/2013 8:35:28 AM EST
Anybody know what the corrosion/solvent/ and wear resistance of these lowers is?

It seems like a neat idea a lower that weighs 35% less than aluminum.

So, thoughts input or otherwise?
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:37:46 AM EST
Link and pics, please.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:39:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:41:17 AM EST
Does anyone make one?
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:41:46 AM EST
It's used in structural applications, engine blocks, all kinds of wheel, et cetera. It's just basically lighter aluminum.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:44:40 AM EST
Is it worth all the trouble to save 2 ounces of weight?
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:45:58 AM EST
Don't let it catch on fire. The Navy would not approve, so no go for military use.


Other than that, sounds cool.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:52:23 AM EST
Dont get it in salt water.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 8:59:23 AM EST
You could save maybe another ounce with a titanium buffer spring for $200 or so.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:02:50 AM EST
Originally Posted By ghengiskhabb:
Don't let it catch on fire. The Navy would not approve, so no go for military use.


Other than that, sounds cool.


Has potential to be a new ARFCOM meme.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:07:19 AM EST
Don't see the point. Aluminum lowers are already super light.

Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:08:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By tamu94:
Dont get it in salt water.


You're thinking Zinc
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:18:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By JoeCoastie:
Originally Posted By tamu94:
Dont get it in salt water.


You're thinking Zinc

They're both sacrificial anodes. And water does affect magnesium because of this.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:19:34 AM EST
Originally Posted By Sturmgeist:
It's used in structural applications, engine blocks, all kinds of wheel, et cetera. It's just basically lighter aluminum.


That can catch fire. And has different metallurgical and fabrication properties. And has different surface treatments.

But other than that, it's just like aluminum. But lighter.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:26:09 AM EST
"Why is this AR lower so heavy?" Said no one ever.

Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:28:54 AM EST
Magnesium is much more reactive with oxygen than aluminum. While strong and light, aluminum makes better tools than does magnesium because both will get nicks, wear and abrasions in use. The aluminum will be less prone to corrosion.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:30:13 AM EST
Originally Posted By MadProfessor:
"Why is this AR lower so heavy?" Said no one ever.



Ever pick up a stainless steel lower? The were around during the last ban.

Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:31:44 AM EST
we use mag alot in my business ( motor racing) and i would not want a rifle made of it.

Link Posted: 6/17/2013 9:32:30 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2013 9:33:33 AM EST by AeroE]
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:13:26 AM EST
I know hardly a day goes by without me wondering why the fuck AR lowers are so heavy,there has to be a lighter material we could use
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:15:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By Krink:
I know hardly a day goes by without me wondering why the fuck AR lowers are so heavy,there has to be a lighter material we could use


Polymer... Oh wait.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:20:50 AM EST
Originally Posted By R2point0:
Originally Posted By Sturmgeist:
It's used in structural applications, engine blocks, all kinds of wheel, et cetera. It's just basically lighter aluminum.


That can catch fire. And has different metallurgical and fabrication properties. And has different surface treatments.

But other than that, it's just like aluminum. But lighter.


Aluminum can burn... just not so easily or as well under normal circumstances.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:21:59 AM EST
My LGS has some. They look OK and are certainly light. I thought they might be nice for a pistol build.
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:23:07 AM EST
Do not want
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:26:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2013 4:01:52 PM EST by themagikbullet]
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
Don't see the point. Aluminum lowers are already super light.



I got one of the mag tac fde lowers. I'm using it for a light recce. I figure it gives a discount on the weight on the porky swfa 1-6 I'm using. Or, it makes a t1 and larue mount "free" in terms of weight.

meh, I like the occasional whizbang chotchke of questionable necessity
Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:28:20 AM EST
Magnesium corrodes like a motherfucker if you don't keep the protective coating in place.

Here's my take on it, the lower was engineered designed to be made out of aluminum.
If you build the lower out of anything else and don't engineer and design it to take advantage of the specific strengths of the material you are using then you're wasting time and money.



Link Posted: 6/17/2013 10:44:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By ar2de:
Magnesium is much more reactive with oxygen than aluminum. While strong and light, aluminum makes better tools than does magnesium because both will get nicks, wear and abrasions in use. The aluminum will be less prone to corrosion.


From what I under stand aluminum is practically impervious to corrosion due to the oxidation layer that forms. Obviously some things can attack it and corrode it like mercury or a strong base.
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