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6/25/2017 7:35:25 PM
6/21/2017 8:25:40 PM
Posted: 9/21/2012 8:41:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2012 8:43:06 AM EDT by RRD3]
I ordered some Green River knife blanks from Track of the Wolf and thought I would try my hand at forcing a patina before making a custom handle and putting it together.

Here's what I started out with.




Took a shoelace soaked in regular mustard and wrapped the blade. Set the blade in vinegar for 3 hours and the last hour I added a little juice to it.



The finished product. Pictures don't show detail as good as I hoped, but you can still see the patina with a pretty cool color and effect.




Anyone try a different method? Like to try something different on the sheep skinner.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:44:15 AM EDT
How long does that finish last?
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:46:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2012 8:46:37 AM EDT by RRD3]

Originally Posted By pale_pony:
How long does that finish last?

Should last a good long time on a high carbon blade. After I took it out of the dip and rinsed it off to neutralize it and rubbed it down with a scotch brite pad. The whipped it down with oil.
Looks like its on there pretty good.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:47:31 AM EDT
naval jelly
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:48:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
naval jelly

Dip or blotch it on?
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:49:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2012 8:50:38 AM EDT by JDeere7296]
Blade looks good, I like the striped look the shoelaces give.

Not really a patina but I took a blueing agent and blued the blade, buffed it down with steel wool, blued again, then repeated. It gave a nice bluish sheen to the knife I found nice. I used horseradish once to force a patina on a knife, had to do it a couple of times. Then wiped down really well with gun oil. Some of the patina came off but not much. I've used it twice on deer and the patina has lasted. I think the horseradish has more acid in it which causes a darker affect on the knife
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:49:47 AM EDT
This is the knife equivalent of driveway tossing.

Just use it. Don't baby it. it'll gain it's own patina.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:52:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
This is the knife equivalent of driveway tossing.

Just use it. Don't baby it. it'll gain it's own patina.

A lot of knife makers do this before putting the piece together, not saying I'm a knife maker but it's fun to work with.

The patina helps protect the blade from rust as well.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:53:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
This is the knife equivalent of driveway tossing.

Just use it. Don't baby it. it'll gain it's own patina.


uh oh

this guy is right, don't blue your guns either, they will gain their own patina too

Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:56:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By popsickles:
Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
This is the knife equivalent of driveway tossing.

Just use it. Don't baby it. it'll gain it's own patina.


uh oh

this guy is right, don't blue your guns either, they will gain their own patina too



You use the sidewalk to force a patina on guns.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 9:03:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By popsickles:
Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
This is the knife equivalent of driveway tossing.

Just use it. Don't baby it. it'll gain it's own patina.


uh oh

this guy is right, don't blue your guns either, they will gain their own patina too



Actually, this is the way it used to be done. Guns would come out in the white. Over a period of time, they would brown which is a much more durable finish than bluing.

Best way to quicken it on a knife is to cut up a lemon. It'll start browning almost instantly. Fine steel wool and repeat until you have a decent depth of finish. Edge will always be bright, though and will need oil protectant.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 9:12:04 AM EDT
I soaked an Opinel blade in lemon crystal light overnight - blade wound up with a uniform black finish that hasn't rusted or pitted in 6 years.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 9:14:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brewthunda:
I soaked an Opinel blade in lemon crystal light overnight - blade wound up with a uniform black finish that hasn't rusted or pitted in 6 years.

Crystal light, no shit. Would have never thought about that. Might give that a shot on the next blade.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 9:16:57 AM EDT
I've read about - but never tried - boiling the blade in a 50/50 mixture of white vinegar and distilled water. Take it out rub it down with some steel wool and repeat if necessary.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 9:21:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RRD3:

Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
naval jelly

Dip or blotch it on?


apply with small brush, let sice couple minutes, wipe off. Tone with steel wool.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 9:29:24 AM EDT
What you did gives you a nice looking design but it doesn't provide much protection. That will still rust rather rather easily. I prefer a warm vinegar bath for a solid, uniform patina to increase rust resistance. When it is done it almost looks parkerized. Just soak it until it is nice and dark and then rinse. Strop the edge and oil it up and you are good to go.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 9:36:09 AM EDT
I just wrapped an old blade with a snake skin covered in mustard and fire and ice pickle juice.

I wonder how its gonna look
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 12:30:23 PM EDT
I used toilet bowl cleaner with some humidity to brown a tomahawk head a while back. The hardened steel didn't turn very brown but it has a nice patina that makes it look old.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 4:23:08 PM EDT
Boiling it in apple cider vinegar gives it a soft black/dark grey patina.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:20:02 PM EDT
I've been thinking of trying this out with my big M-43 kukhuri from Himalayan Imports. Several people on the Blade Forums have done similar patina on their khuks, and it looks pretty damn cool. The bravest I've been with mine is to cold-blue it occasionally. Birchwood-Casey bluing paste is crap, though, and not durable at all.





Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:23:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Ironhandjohn:
I've been thinking of trying this out with my big M-43 kukhuri from Himalayan Imports. Several people on the Blade Forums have done similar patina on their khuks, and it looks pretty damn cool. The bravest I've been with mine is to cold-blue it occasionally. Birchwood-Casey bluing paste is crap, though, and not durable at all.

http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri007.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri006.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri001.jpg





That sir, is BADASS!
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:26:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By popsickles:
I just wrapped an old blade with a snake skin covered in mustard and fire and ice pickle juice.

I wonder how its gonna look


who cares how its looks that sounds yummy!
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:29:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:30:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ironhandjohn:
I've been thinking of trying this out with my big M-43 kukhuri from Himalayan Imports. Several people on the Blade Forums have done similar patina on their khuks, and it looks pretty damn cool. The bravest I've been with mine is to cold-blue it occasionally. Birchwood-Casey bluing paste is crap, though, and not durable at all.

http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri007.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri006.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri001.jpg


Might be the metal composition, cold blue worked really well on my Camillus K-Bar
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:31:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By sel366:
Originally Posted By Ironhandjohn:
I've been thinking of trying this out with my big M-43 kukhuri from Himalayan Imports. Several people on the Blade Forums have done similar patina on their khuks, and it looks pretty damn cool. The bravest I've been with mine is to cold-blue it occasionally. Birchwood-Casey bluing paste is crap, though, and not durable at all.

http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri007.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri006.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri001.jpg







That sir, is BADASS!


Thank you!!

When the 'Walkers' make it to Nashville I'm ready for them...
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:33:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
Originally Posted By popsickles:
I just wrapped an old blade with a snake skin covered in mustard and fire and ice pickle juice.

I wonder how its gonna look


who cares how its looks that sounds yummy!


meh it just made it look old

and snake skin and mustard does not smell good
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:33:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By AeroE:
Make a humidity box to brown the blade. There are some really aggressive methods, such as clorine bleach, but keep a tight rein on the process or your knife will look like you dug it up out of the garden.




yup sweat box is the way to go on some older double barrels. takes time and lots of carding off the finish..

ok for some thing that looks wild is hot/cold (hot works better) blue then splash muratic (sp) acid on it. it will splotch all to hell, we used it to strip blueing on stuff we can polish out completely..
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:34:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MACD:

Originally Posted By Ironhandjohn:
I've been thinking of trying this out with my big M-43 kukhuri from Himalayan Imports. Several people on the Blade Forums have done similar patina on their khuks, and it looks pretty damn cool. The bravest I've been with mine is to cold-blue it occasionally. Birchwood-Casey bluing paste is crap, though, and not durable at all.

http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri007.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri006.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri001.jpg


Might be the metal composition, cold blue worked really well on my Camillus K-Bar



HI blades are made from truck leaf spring, ideally from old Mercedes trucks found in junkyards in India, then hauled to Nepal on a bus. The kamis put a seriously high polish on the finished blade, but a few whacks is all it takes to scratch it. I've scuffed mine down with a green pot-scrubber from time to time because I like the matte finish it gives the blade.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:47:13 PM EDT
So THIS is what knife people do instead of throwing a rifle down the driveway...
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:55:22 PM EDT
Soak the blade in white vinegar. Anywhere from a few minutes, to an hour. Another way is to wrap the blade in a vinegar soaked towel for up to an hour.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:55:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jrollins:
So THIS is what knife people do instead of throwing a rifle down the driveway...

A patina will actually protect the steel from corrosion.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:56:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2012 7:57:46 PM EDT by popsickles]
Originally Posted By Ironhandjohn:
Originally Posted By MACD:

Originally Posted By Ironhandjohn:
I've been thinking of trying this out with my big M-43 kukhuri from Himalayan Imports. Several people on the Blade Forums have done similar patina on their khuks, and it looks pretty damn cool. The bravest I've been with mine is to cold-blue it occasionally. Birchwood-Casey bluing paste is crap, though, and not durable at all.

http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri007.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri006.jpg
http://i463.photobucket.com/albums/qq355/Ironhandjohn/M-43kukhuri001.jpg


Might be the metal composition, cold blue worked really well on my Camillus K-Bar




HI blades are made from truck leaf spring, ideally from old Mercedes trucks found in junkyards in India, then hauled to Nepal on a bus. The kamis put a seriously high polish on the finished blade, but a few whacks is all it takes to scratch it. I've scuffed mine down with a green pot-scrubber from time to time because I like the matte finish it gives the blade.


Alot of the condor stuff is made from leaf springs, so I've heard.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 7:59:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2012 8:01:21 PM EDT by Dan_Cooper]
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
naval jelly


+1 With a nice coat of oil when you're done.



Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:04:36 PM EDT
http://www.himalayan-imports.com/


The good folks who I got my khukuri from...
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:09:26 PM EDT
These are Blackjack 125's with blades from A2 Tool Steel.

Top knife, green handle, has a vinegar patina
Middle knife, stacked leather handle, has a deer blood (unintentional) patina
Bottom knife, stag handle, is new







Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:13:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2012 8:17:33 PM EDT by EviL_inside]
Just stick it in a potato and leave it a few days couple weeks.
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:27:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dan_Cooper:
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
naval jelly


+1 With a nice coat of oil when you're done.




Coon P

Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:45:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2012 8:45:43 PM EDT by Dan_Cooper]
Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:

Originally Posted By Dan_Cooper:
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
naval jelly


+1 With a nice coat of oil when you're done.




Coon P



Well, sure if you've got a willing coon handy by all means
Link Posted: 9/21/2012 8:50:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
This is the knife equivalent of driveway tossing.

Just use it. Don't baby it. it'll gain it's own patina.

My best looking patina job is on a Mora Companion that I use for regular kitchen chores.
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