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1/14/2017 8:11:35 PM
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Posted: 3/27/2012 8:22:57 AM EST
Anywhere close to a tac or mig weld ?
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:24:19 AM EST
ha, ha, no.

EAW on steel is 50,000 psi or greater.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:25:43 AM EST
A blob of it on the side of a BCG works wonders.

So I hear, at least.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:26:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
ha, ha, no.

EAW on steel is 50,000 psi or greater.

You have never seen my welds. They look like a robotic chicken took a shit all over the part....
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:26:19 AM EST
had a crack in a chevy water pump..filled it with
JB weld...lasted 5 years...good stuff!!
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:27:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By TrojanMan:
ha, ha, no.

EAW on steel is 50,000 psi or greater.


Im not sure on the jb stats. Even 25_50 % might work.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:27:43 AM EST
It cannot handle semi hi heat.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:29:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Anywhere close to a tac or mig weld ?


Not even close to a "PROFESSIONAL" Tig or Mig weld.


Better than a sharp stick in the eye. It does well with rough and CLEAN surfaces.

Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:29:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By Silver_Surfer:
It cannot handle semi hi heat.


Its a square beam in front of the radiator.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:31:18 AM EST
Good for patching, filling etc. I would not use it on anything that took any kind of stress or movement.

I HAVE used it to fill in pits on a badly rusted shotgun receiver, it worked out quite well.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:31:33 AM EST
It works pretty good. You have to have patience, it should sit undisturbed for the full curing time. Overnight is best, don't touch it or think about touching it till it's done.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:32:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Originally Posted By Silver_Surfer:
It cannot handle semi hi heat.


Its a square beam in front of the radiator.


That temp should be OK.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:33:26 AM EST
Some people use it to fix cracked engine blocks.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:33:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By Plumbata:
Good for patching, filling etc. I would not use it on anything that took any kind of stress or movement.

I HAVE used it to fill in pits on a badly rusted shotgun receiver, it worked out quite well.


Cancel my idea then. Thanks guys.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:33:33 AM EST
Originally Posted By Plumbata:
Good for patching, filling etc. I would not use it on anything that took any kind of stress or movement.

I HAVE used it to fill in pits on a badly rusted shotgun receiver, it worked out quite well.


This. I tried several times to fix a broken bracket holding a small generator motor in place and it would break in short order.
Used it on a metal chair too. Broke that too.

Actually. I don't think I have successfully used the stuff.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:34:53 AM EST
I could weld it quicker than you could mix the epoxy.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:35:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2012 8:40:25 AM EST by afroney]
Originally Posted By TUBBY:
Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Anywhere close to a tac or mig weld ?


Not even close to a "PROFESSIONAL" Tig or Mig weld.


Better than a sharp stick in the eye. It does well with rough and CLEAN surfaces.




This. I've had trouble with it adhering to some polymers and coated metals (painted, anodized, etc...) If you are using it with metal, make sure to strip any coatings off and roughen & clean the bare metal surface with some sandpaper and brake cleaner.

JB weld is pretty strong compression and tension wise, but has a relatively low shear strength.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:36:53 AM EST
Originally Posted By thehellbringer:
I could weld it quicker than you could mix the epoxy.


If I had a mig welder so could I . Wanna come to MI
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:37:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2012 8:38:09 AM EST by DriftPunch]
JB Weld is just epoxy. 'Weld' is a marketing term.

As an epoxy, it's decent and forgiving for an amateur to mix/apply. It will work well in almost every scenario where a thick epoxy is called for. If the scenario calls for a weld, it will not work.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:40:19 AM EST
it's good but not that good.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:40:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2012 8:45:03 AM EST by AeroE]
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:45:11 AM EST
no.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:53:13 AM EST
I once used it to repair a gaping hole that got punched out of a cast aluminum oil pan. The hole was big enough to put a golf ball through. I degreased the pan then baked it at 300* to get any oil to seep out of the metal. Used some stainless steel screen as rebar for the repair. I used wax paper and styrofoam as a backing to plug the hole then poured the mixed JB Weld into the hole until it overflowed and covered about an inch out from edge of the hole. Used a heat lamp to help it cure. The oil pan didn't leak a drop for the remaining 2 years I had it before I finally sold the car.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 8:55:50 AM EST
Originally Posted By AeroE:
Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Anywhere close to a tac or mig weld ?


No, not even remotely in the same universe.

A weld fuses the parts together. A bond, whether with epoxy, brazing, or soldering, adheres the parts together through weak atomic and mechanical links.

JB Weld is filled epoxy. Epoxy is a type of plastic, fine for some applications, completely inappropriate for others.

Bonded joints should be designed to transfer loads in shear. They are miserably poor under peeling loads, and only terrible under tension.

The strength of a bond is more complicated than "is it strong"; that's nonsense. What is important is the strength of the adherend (the parts being bonded), the adhesive (the glue or brazing material), and the adhesive strength, the strength of the bond lines. Any one of those can be the weak link.


Im not being snooty, I used to weld a bit. It was a stupid question I asked. Thanks for your reply.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:01:50 AM EST
Would JB Weld be appropriate for locking the threads of a muzzle device to the barrel? So you don't have the pin and weld it?

Or would the heat from shooting be too high for it to work?
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:04:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Would JB Weld be appropriate for locking the threads of a muzzle device to the barrel? So you don't have the pin and weld it?

Or would the heat from shooting be too high for it to work?


I think that could get you in legal trouble.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:14:25 AM EST
I fixed a hole in the side of a supercharged small block Chevy with it, changed the broken rod and it ran for the rest of the weekend. Was still solid when we replaced the block
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:16:55 AM EST
I fixed something that came loose under the hood of my old Mazda 626, it held for the 3 or more years I owned that car.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:20:47 AM EST
No comparrison to a welded repair or mock up..

JB weld if for the shade tree type mechanic needing to solve a quick tempoary fix to continue down the road until a more permanent fix can be done.

JB weld can be used to bed rifle actions, build up trigger parts. plus many more gun smothing needs also. I love the stuff..
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:21:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2012 9:22:16 AM EST by Silver_Surfer]
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Would JB Weld be appropriate for locking the threads of a muzzle device to the barrel? So you don't have the pin and weld it?

Or would the heat from shooting be too high for it to work?


Too high. I tried to attach a comp to the end of my barrel. The JB melted.

Silver soder.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:29:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Would JB Weld be appropriate for locking the threads of a muzzle device to the barrel? So you don't have the pin and weld it?

Or would the heat from shooting be too high for it to work?


I think that could get you in legal trouble.



It has nothing to do with barrel length. I am talking about even threading the muzzle on a 22" barrel. Who gives a shit about how long the barrel is?

The question is whether JB Weld will hold the muzzle device to the barrel? In order to improve barrel harmonics. Or will the heat from shooting make JB weld not work?
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:33:07 AM EST
It has no tensile strength

I've tried to use it to repair parts under torque and it shears right off
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:38:35 AM EST
LOL.....I've used it to replace lost chunks out of plastic/hard rubber butt-plates and pistol grips by making a mold around the missing piece, filling it with JB and sanding it to size when cured. I never had a issue with it failing.

I once made front sight for a .22 using just the broken-off dovetail and a machine screw. I just D&Ted the dovetail for the screw and made me a little mold, filled it with jb and set the "sight" into the JB, when it dried I shaped it to match the unobtainable front sight with a dremel. It held up for the 10 years I had it.

Like others have said it's a epoxy, use it like it.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:43:59 AM EST
I had plastic end cap on a radiator break once. I was basically stranded due to the amount of steam the leak was producing when the fluid squirted onto the engine. I stopped into the auto store and bought some high temp putty for a temp fix. It leaked.
So I bought some JB weld and gooped it over the putty covered hole. Waited an hour before driving. It lasted about six years before I finally sold the truck to a scrapper.
Its good stuff.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:45:01 AM EST
i used it on the plastic mowing deck of my honda - not sure how it holds up with temp changes and metal surfaces.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:47:16 AM EST

Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Would JB Weld be appropriate for locking the threads of a muzzle device to the barrel? So you don't have the pin and weld it?

Or would the heat from shooting be too high for it to work?

Nope, you would be in violation. There are only 2 methods allowed: 1) pin and weld 2) Silver Solder (1,100+ from memory)
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:48:21 AM EST

Originally Posted By armoredsaint:
i used it on the plastic mowing deck of my honda - not sure how it holds up with temp changes and metal surfaces.

Fine on dimensionally stable stuff like steel. Crap on plastic since the plastic expands and contracts by large amounts and the epoxy doesn't. It'll flash off.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 9:49:01 AM EST
Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Originally Posted By Silver_Surfer:
It cannot handle semi hi heat.


Its a square beam in front of the radiator.


If you mean a bumper reinforcement. NO.

You dont want to weld that either. Rebars are designed with specific strengths engineered into them. Altering such will change things such as airbag timing. I rebar is a safety item and should be replaced if it shows any damaged or is compromised.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 10:09:47 AM EST
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Would JB Weld be appropriate for locking the threads of a muzzle device to the barrel? So you don't have the pin and weld it?

Or would the heat from shooting be too high for it to work?


I think that could get you in legal trouble.



It has nothing to do with barrel length. I am talking about even threading the muzzle on a 22" barrel. Who gives a shit about how long the barrel is?

The question is whether JB Weld will hold the muzzle device to the barrel? In order to improve barrel harmonics. Or will the heat from shooting make JB weld not work?


Sorry if I had the wrong idea. I thought you meant something else.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 10:37:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

Originally Posted By ambalamps:
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Would JB Weld be appropriate for locking the threads of a muzzle device to the barrel? So you don't have the pin and weld it?

Or would the heat from shooting be too high for it to work?


I think that could get you in legal trouble.



It has nothing to do with barrel length. I am talking about even threading the muzzle on a 22" barrel. Who gives a shit about how long the barrel is?

The question is whether JB Weld will hold the muzzle device to the barrel? In order to improve barrel harmonics. Or will the heat from shooting make JB weld not work?


Most people would assume the question was about barrel length because you mentioned pinning and welding. Red Loktite is what you seek if not trying to get +16" length.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 10:43:45 AM EST
My grandpa fixed my Grandmas false teeth with JB Weld when I was a kid, it held for the 3 weeks she used them waiting on a new set...found them when we cleaned out the house after she died, still together. I should have kept them, no one ever believes me.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 11:24:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By DriftPunch:
JB Weld is just epoxy. 'Weld' is a marketing term.

As an epoxy, it's decent and forgiving for an amateur to mix/apply. It will work well in almost every scenario where a thick epoxy is called for. If the scenario calls for a weld, it will not work.


This


It's a great epoxy, I use it to glue inserts into broadheads. I have never had one seperate,

Link Posted: 3/27/2012 2:01:47 PM EST
when mixed right... its hard enough to machine into a useable part...
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 2:04:16 PM EST

russia uses it extensively on their subs

Link Posted: 3/27/2012 2:05:21 PM EST
I use it to fill in selector cutouts on surplus M14 stocks. Works good for that.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 2:07:16 PM EST
Strong enough to seal up octomom's cooch.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 3:58:21 PM EST
I never had any luck with that shit...bubblegum works better.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 4:18:49 PM EST
Not impressed with JB. Takes forever to cure and is no stronger than Loctite 5min epoxy. It works as filler, but will not fix anything under stress.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 4:26:09 PM EST
I've had good luck with JB Weld for low strength parts. Compression, it is good for 3000 PSI. Tensile strength? 500 PSI.

Welds start off at 45,000 PSI tensile and get better. Some braze joints can top 65,000 PSI. My basic weld filler metal is 70,000 PSI tensile strength.

JB Weld is less strength than soft solder in tensile strength.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 4:28:38 PM EST
it's Chuck Norris strong.
Link Posted: 3/27/2012 4:31:37 PM EST
The one time I used it, it failed to hold a FH on an AK....
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