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Posted: 10/11/2011 7:52:17 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 7:58:19 AM EDT
I would assume there is some sort of makers mark stamping on it that would tell you what you need to know?
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:08:04 AM EDT
You might start at replacements.com to get info on it and an idea what the set is worth in new condition and work down from there.
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:10:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By shaggy:
You might start at replacements.com to get info on it and an idea what the set is worth in new condition and work down from there.


That.

If you can't figure out what the pattern is, take a picture and send it to Replacements. They will ID it for you.
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:14:13 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:14:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2011 8:17:53 AM EDT by ScottsGT]
Majority of it these days is only worth spot value. Unless it is some rare piece or antique value to it. Get it appraised first before scrapping. My wifes jeweler had a huge pile of silver platters and coffee pots and other odds and ends piled up in the corner of his shop he just took in as scrap. I found a site on teh metal detecting forums where you can get the biggest return on your dollar. Direct to the smelters! If really interested, I can find the name again.

Here's a site that you can look up the makers mark.

http://www.silver-collector.com/index.php
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:14:30 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:15:44 AM EDT
First identify it as sterling or plated. It will be embossed somewhere on the back. If it's plated, no silver value but perhaps collectable nonetheless. If sterling (.925) it would have PM value and possibly more as a collectable. Easy enough to research values as collectable. Most sterling is valued at melt value.
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:16:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
What's the rough percentage of silver in silverware?


Sterling silver is 92.5% silver.
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:17:20 AM EDT
What are the markings? Need to know that to know what it's made of.

Here's a site that has lots of markings:

http://www.925-1000.com/
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:17:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ohio_Bill:
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
What's the rough percentage of silver in silverware?


Sterling silver is 92.5% silver.


Sterling is 925 but not all silver is sterling. OP needs to find that out.
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:18:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zhukov:

Originally Posted By shaggy:
You might start at replacements.com to get info on it and an idea what the set is worth in new condition and work down from there.

Cool - I'll give them a try.


Replacements is the AIM Surplus of silver, crystal and china. Terrific company to deal with.
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:18:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
Originally Posted By Ohio_Bill:
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
What's the rough percentage of silver in silverware?


Sterling silver is 92.5% silver.


Sterling is 925 but not all silver is sterling. OP needs to find that out.


I agree
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:20:53 AM EDT
Much of it is plated. If it isn't marked Sterling or .925, it is not totally silver. If it is really old, it may have value due to the maker, as already noted. Some of it can be quite valuable, but mostly it is not.

Start here: English makers' marks
Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:29:53 AM EDT
The local gold/silver coin dealer had a customer come in with a box full the other day. Any larger coin dealer will be able to tell you exactly what the melt value is!


Link Posted: 10/11/2011 8:36:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2011 8:37:56 AM EDT by callgood]
Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:
Originally Posted By Ohio_Bill:
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
What's the rough percentage of silver in silverware?


Sterling silver is 92.5% silver.


Sterling is 925 but not all silver is sterling. OP needs to find that out.


Sterling is supposed to be 92.5%. After the melt some refiners will claim 90%, etc.

So the formula would be -

1 oz = 0.911458 troy ounces

Ounces * .911458 * 92.5% (or whatever they claim they recovered) * value of silver the day they did the melt * the percentage the refiner will pay (example, 90%).

I recently sold a sterling tea set with a ruined finish to a refiner (and it was ugly as all get out) and put the money towards a new roof.

Compare the value of the melt with what Replacements LTD will give you. I've used them before for purchases and they're good to deal with.

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