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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 3/31/2001 8:19:40 AM EDT
This bouncer at the bar (cute.. from Italy [;)]) gave me his number last night. He teachs jujitsu and I had asked about taking lessons. Any of y'all have any experience with jujitsu? How is this form of martial arts versus others?
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 8:20:40 AM EDT
I am 1/2 Norwegian and 1/2 Itallian. And I bet I am cuter than him. Dig cam in a month.....
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 8:24:00 AM EDT
Funny.. I'm half Norwegian, too... Coincidence? I think not.... [:p]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 8:26:04 AM EDT
Well, if we could get together, i'd be glad to put a little Itallian in ya...
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 8:28:22 AM EDT
Oh My GAWD! I just figured out who you are !!! LMAO!! I'd have never guessed it.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 8:30:58 AM EDT
And who, pray tell, do you think I am? ::confused:: And I'm not really interested in a "little" Italian.. [;)]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 8:38:59 AM EDT
jujitsu, Isn't that a small dog. Sounds like a good pickup line. If you go for lessons and you are the only one there, and he is naked. He probably is not on the up and up.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 8:54:17 AM EDT
Jujitsu is very good martial art, more practical than some more "sport" arts these days, although it too has its flaws, it´ s very effective.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:10:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/31/2001 9:15:51 AM EDT by Rons_Toys]
Jujitsu is the root of many of todays martial arts, the main one being Judo. Judo is second only to soccer as the most practiced sport in the world. Judo has been a Olympic sport since '64 This sport is for everyone, my family is really involoved in the sport, my niece is a 3 time national champion in Judo Ron http://JudoInfo.com/kano6.htm In feudal times in Japan, there were various military arts and exercises which the samurai classes were trained and fitted for their special form of warfare. Amongst these was the art of jujutsu, from which the present judo has sprung up. The word jujutsu may be translated freely as "the art of gaining victory by yielding or pliancy." Originally, the name seems to have been applied to what may best be described as the art of fighting without weapons, although in some cases short weapons were used against opponents fighting with long weapons. Although it seems to resemble wrestling, yet it differs materially from wrestling as practiced in England, its main principle being not to match strength with strength, but to gain victory by yielding to strength. Since the abolition of the Feudal System the art has for some time been out of use, but at the present time it has become very popular in Japan, though with some important modifications, as a system of athletics, and its value as a method for physical training has been recognized by the establishment of several schools of jujutsu and judo in the capital.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:10:58 AM EDT
Yes, actually I've been taking Juijitsu for about a year and a half now, on and off. Juijitsu is an old martial art that was given "re-birth" about a hundred years ago by the Brazilians. Juijitsu is one of the finest martial arts I have taken. While most others emphasis hand/foot strikes, controlled stances, and useless forms, Juijitsu is more known as "shoot wrestling". We use wrestling techniques, such as throws, takedowns, and ground holds, but we incorporate another factor as well: submission moves. These include coratid choke holds, arm and knee bars (holds that put very painful pressure on the elbow and knee areas), ankle locks, and other techniques. The object is to take down your opponent, and subsequently submit him or "make him tap out" by applying one of these holds (and not getting them put on you!). Many of the Extreme Fighting / UFC competitors, such as Royce Gracie and Ken Shamrock have adapted and mastered this art, and have become champions in their own time. I don't mean to sound sexist, but this is a HIGHLY male-orientated martial art, simply because...when you can't use technique to defeat your opponent, you can still use brute strength (and I work out with a few BIG guys). But hey this is the 21st century; if you get past that bit of intimidation, then you can truly be a great student. If not for purposes of aerobic exercise, building strength in your neck, back, and stomach, and learning more about yourself, i.e. what your body can and cannot take, Juijitsu alone is a wonderful "martial art" and it has improved my health and dexterity ever since I started. Another thing, finding a good Juijitsu instructor (unlike TaeKwonDo which can be found on every street corner) is a task in and of itself. You found a cute guy and an instructor, go for it! [;)]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:12:27 AM EDT
I studied kenpo jujitsu for a little bit, but ahd to stop when I moved from one state to another. It's a great style to study. Try out a few lessons and see if you like it.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:13:28 AM EDT
I'm thinking of taking it because I've always wanted to learn a martial art. For self defense, yes, but also because I love learning new things. And if it turns into naked wrestling, I might learn something new that way, too! [;)]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:18:03 AM EDT
Wanna wrestle?
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:20:36 AM EDT
Would you like me to show you the "mount" position? Or maybe I could instruct you on the "four corners 69 hold" personally...yeah... [:D]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:21:43 AM EDT
Oh, for the love of Pete, you two!! ::rolling eyes::
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:32:20 AM EDT
I have a shodan black belt in Hakko-Ryu Jiu-Jitsu, a master of Glock-Fu, and if all else fails I can just radio for back up and arrest your @ss. All that and a cocky good looking Filipino bod....what was the question again? [sex] [beer]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:34:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/31/2001 9:47:59 AM EDT by CAR15M4]
My unarmed self defense classes back in Ohio were Jujitsu based. I'm no expert, but I remember most of what I was taught years after I went through my classes, which unlike Koga, is a testament to the sport. It didn't hurt that my instructor, Mike LaMonica was one of the top ranked, if not the top ranked N. American "Sensei"/Shihan-Kaiden/San Dai Kichu" (don't as what it all means: I don't know"). You will have lots of fun. Jay Arizona
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:36:17 AM EDT
I am a Master of Ching ching pow. Hell just go out with the guy already.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:43:18 AM EDT
Here's the rub... he's shorter than I am. And I'm uncomfortable dating guys that are shorter than me... it makes me feel like an Amazon. I'm 5'8" and I usually wear stacked heels so it's more like 5'10" or 5'11". Okay.. maybe I am an Amazon... [:D] But I really do want to learn jujitsu. And maybe he's got a taller brother... ::evil grin::
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:44:15 AM EDT
I suggest you ask Gecko45! AKA MALL NINJA!!![}:D]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:50:16 AM EDT
Did some one call me? Sorry, I was busy apprehending a code 34 in Sector 2, but he put the extra napkin back, so I have time now. I am a master of three martial arts, but Jiujitsu is not one of them. I have instruct my team on Aiki-Jitsu, and they all know basic apprehend and takedown procedure for dealing with shoplifters and people who forget to flush the toilets by the food court. I'd be willing to instruct you in some of the more obscure lessons contained in the ancient scroll, where are you located, Ma'am?
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:50:31 AM EDT
uhh...well...oh yeah, [i]I'm[/i] a drunken master.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:05:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/31/2001 10:05:49 AM EDT by SteyrAUG]
Will all you gaijin please take note. It is Ju Jutsu, not Ju Jitsu. Sometimes the romanization Jui Jutsu is permitted. The literal translation is Ju, meaning soft or gentle and Jutsu, meaning technique or method. Please study up on the romanization of Nihongo before you declare yourself a expert on the subject. In addition, the Brazillians did not cause a rebirth 100 years ago, that is when they saw it for the first time. The general rebirth, although mostly associated with the post meiji form of Judo, was post WW2 due to study by occupational forces. The Brazillian style was largely unknown more than 20 years ago.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:12:44 AM EDT
I thought Barney Fife started the rebirth in 1962. Or at least I thought he did on the episode of the Andy Griffith show.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:19:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By QCMGR: I thought Barney Fife started the rebirth in 1962. Or at least I thought he did on the episode of the Andy Griffith show.
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Hey that's right. Or would he somehow qaulify as "occupational forces?"
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:30:09 AM EDT
yo guys, i got you all beat. i know octopus style. thats where i grope miss magnum like i had eight arms[:D]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:32:32 AM EDT
I think I will reserve my intentions towards Miss Magnum, and any other "female" here until pictures are posted. No disrespect intended.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:46:09 AM EDT
Hate to prove you wrong, oh great one SteyrAUG, but the Brazilians really did cause the rebirth of the "modern" Jiu-"JIT"su in its competition form. Most Alliance, Tiger, ******, and the Army Rangers in Ft. Benning, GA practice the Brazilian form. The Japanese martial artists, in an attempt to establish immigrantsBrazil about a 100 years ago, made friends with one of the grandfather-Gracies (I forget his name), who was in politics at the time. They taught him Juijitsu, and he in turn passed it down to all the other "great Gracies" we know today. VALE TUDO, the modern all-out, nothing-barred fighting was assimilated into the Americas (who knows when) with the bringing in of Jiujitsu. Now, Royce, Renzo, Rickson, and a few of the others have dominated the sport with their art. And while Jiujitsu is not new, I say it was given a "rebirth", simply because if it wasn't for them, who knows: the art might have stayed in Japan...makes sense, no? [:D] But I'm sure your history is valid too, I'm just looking at it from a competitive standpoint.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:46:35 AM EDT
Yes I tried it a time or two and the only thing I can tell you is that it is way too much work before you actually learn anything. when I come home from work after a few days I usually give the wife the Over the shoulder reach around hold (.)(.). What ever the hell its called, Cant always tell weather she loves it or hates it. Oh yea, I love tall women you sound just right
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 10:51:46 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Miss Magnum: I'm 5'8" and I usually wear stacked heels so it's more like 5'10" or 5'11". [:D]
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5'8"!! Do you have that VA accent? I am 6'2" and I love tall women. Hunter out...
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 11:00:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Jewbroni: Hate to prove you wrong, oh great one SteyrAUG, but the Brazilians really did cause the rebirth of the "modern" Jiu-"JIT"su in its competition form. Most Alliance, Tiger, ******, and the Army Rangers in Ft. Benning, GA practice the Brazilian form. The Japanese martial artists, in an attempt to establish immigrantsBrazil about a 100 years ago, made friends with one of the grandfather-Gracies (I forget his name), who was in politics at the time. They taught him Juijitsu, and he in turn passed it down to all the other "great Gracies" we know today. VALE TUDO, the modern all-out, nothing-barred fighting was assimilated into the Americas (who knows when) with the bringing in of Jiujitsu. Now, Royce, Renzo, Rickson, and a few of the others have dominated the sport with their art. And while Jiujitsu is not new, I say it was given a "rebirth", simply because if it wasn't for them, who knows: the art might have stayed in Japan...makes sense, no? [:D] But I'm sure your history is valid too, I'm just looking at it from a competitive standpoint.
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Yes, but the "rebirth" did not happen 100 years ago. It was mostly a family art confined to Brazil until a couple decades ago. The establishment of Kodokan Judo by Jigaro Kano is mostly responsible for the preservation of the older "jutsu" form. Without the modern "do" version being established the other might have been lost. Kokodan style was widely disseminated and was even studied by Teddy Roosevelt. When SAC forces began the study of Asian, and principly Japanese, martial arts in the early fifties they were more interested int the combative "jutsu' form than the sport of Judo. This brought it, and other styles to the attention of other NATO forces. Current military forces do indeed practice the Gracie form, but how long has this been the case? I will allow that they created the modern "rebirth", but Japanese ryu have been reborn several times and this is nothing new. As a result you have not proven me wrong on any point. You are stating current events only.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 11:49:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 11:57:06 AM EDT
I personally don't care how it spelled, as long as you can actually do it. Wearing Gracie T-shirts and Gi's doesn't make the martial-artist, HARD training does. I think that both the Japanese "stand-up" styles and Brazillian "ground-fighting" styles are both excellent. Got a pic Miss? [pissed]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 12:12:58 PM EDT
The term "Jujitsu" is actually a very generic term for all the empty handed fighting styles of feudal Japan. At one time there have been well over 100 different schools in Japan teaching their own little slants to this thing called jujitsu. Judo, as Rons Toys was talking about, was created from a mixture of two of these schools...the Tenshin Shinyo Ryu, and the Kito Ryu. As for comparing Jujitsu to other martial arts, it would be inappropriate to say it is the "best", as all fighting styles have their advantages. The advantages of grappling arts is that it closes the distance between fighters, thus making striking less effective for the opponent. Rons Toys...I am a member of Purdue's Judo club here in IN, where are you from?
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 12:25:04 PM EDT
Berserker, very correct (except for the spelling). This form of combat was auxillary to fighting with arms and was based upon the concept of both opponents wearing Japanese armor. This is why striking, while found in the orthodox styles, is somewhat minimal.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 4:02:14 PM EDT
MM, might I suggest you try out a class. It is really the best thing. Kinda like buying a gun; you can get as many recommendation as possible, but the final decision is after you handle the weapon. SteyrAUG has some good points about this art. I myself am more partial to the Chinese arts, so I would maybe suggest taking an art called Chin-Na or Wing Tsun. Good for close in fighting. Especially for fighting off some of these guys that want to show you their version of "close quarter" combat. Filipino Kali/Arnis is good also. Although primarily a form of stick, dagger and sword fighting, the movements translate to open hand as well. No matter what you decide, do not date the instructor!!!! Could be disastrous to your learning experience of the art.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 6:04:05 PM EDT
Berserker, I myself did not get involved in the sport but my brother did. From what you have written I whould guess you should know my brother or heard of him. Do a Google search on the old Detroit Judo club and Jerry Wee. He was just down in Indy a week or so ago. He is a judge and also runs the local YMCA. You can also go back to my other post and follow the links. My brother is also on the promotion board, I think he heads it up. They have been trying to give him his 6th black but he says that it's too soon. If you want you can e-mail me for more info. toysofbigboys@yahoo.com Ron
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 6:07:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By lordtrader: MM, might I suggest you try out a class. It is really the best thing. Kinda like buying a gun; you can get as many recommendation as possible, but the final decision is after you handle the weapon. SteyrAUG has some good points about this art. I myself am more partial to the Chinese arts, so I would maybe suggest taking an art called Chin-Na or Wing Tsun. Good for close in fighting. Especially for fighting off some of these guys that want to show you their version of "close quarter" combat. Filipino Kali/Arnis is good also. Although primarily a form of stick, dagger and sword fighting, the movements translate to open hand as well. No matter what you decide, do not date the instructor!!!! Could be disastrous to your learning experience of the art.
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Lordtrader, I myself practice Tang Lang Chuan Fa. Have some experience with Choy Li Fut as well.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 6:37:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SteyrAUG: Lordtrader, I myself practice Tang Lang Chuan Fa. Have some experience with Choy Li Fut as well.
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Choy Li Fut you say, cool. I studied that for awhile(1yr) when I was in H.S. under Doc Fai Wong in S.F. At the time I did not like the idea that his black sash taught most of the classes rather he himself. Now I understand why. Wish I would have continued on. Hind sight is REALLY 20/20. Right around the time I was stationed in SoCal, I found out one of his students was teaching in the San Diego area. I was fortunate enough to train with him again for a while, until I started going back to finish college.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 6:53:29 PM EDT
Under Doc Fai Wong? You f**kin' suck!My god, I hate you. Did you study with Brendan Lai as well? Bastard! That is the only good thing about Kali. I was fortunate in my instruction, no celebrities, but all authentic. One of my teachers has a family photo of his grandfather, him as a child, and Gichen Funakoshi, Kenwa Mabuni and Morei Ueshiba. These were his grandfathers "freinds" Seems grandad was a member of the Kyoto Bujinkan.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 7:08:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SteyrAUG: Under Doc Fai Wong? You f**kin' suck!My god, I hate you. Did you study with Brendan Lai as well?
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Out of the whole year I was at his school, he only taught the class 2x. I saw him a total of maybe 4x. Did not study under Brendan Lai but I use to live about a mile from his school. I hear nowadays both are charging upwards of $2500+ a year for lessons. Talk about celebrity status. Back in the day I paid, or rather my dad paid, about $60 a month for lessons(early 80's). One thing I learned a few years back and still practice to this day is a Plum Blossom Jian form. That is not only pretty and grace full if properly done, it is also an awesome workout for your mid section and legs. Looking at my belly maybe I oughta do it more often. [@:D]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 7:12:24 PM EDT
Yes, but do you have a mook in your backyard? I just know this will blow up in my face.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 7:31:26 PM EDT
Nah I don't have a mook. Don't even have a backyard. I live in an apt. complex. Haven't really been training much the past 6yrs. Since I just moved to a new city and state I promised myself to do so again. Just need to find a kwoon that I like. [i]People are probably reading this and thinking we are speaking in codes with the terms 'mook' 'jian' and 'kwoon'[/i]
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 7:37:56 PM EDT
Well, I think the only really good response that came from this post was my very first one: about what exactly generic "Jiujitsu" is, and what the general purpose of training is. We could all go into the history of the Japanese creation, renovation, introduction, modification, and correlations of the art. Hell, I sound like Jesee Jackson now :) If you want to take it, take it for what it is, not for what it was or how it got here. Know that 1.) It is different from 99% of the martial arts 2.) It will take your body to the limits 99% of the time 3.) It is 99% better than anything else you could take.....ok, I suppose that was an opiniated statement, but the rest were true [:D]. Give it a shot, but just don't go into it thinking you'll be studying forms and learning to side kick, reverse punch, fan block, etc etc. You'll be getting down and dirty, getting sweaty and smelly, and having either a great time or a terrible one b/c you're gettin' a whoopin'....like I do many times! But trust me, even if it's not your style, the experience of taking just one class is well worth it. Good Luck, Miss Mag!
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 7:38:53 PM EDT
I jest wanna see Ms. Magnum learn enough to put one of youse guys in "Juji" (sp) and see how bad she can make you wimper before she makes you do the dishes.
Link Posted: 3/31/2001 9:59:02 PM EDT
I don't know anything about Jujitsu, but I have been training in the ancient asian art of [b]Feng Shui[/b]. Been taking it for a few months now with a master. I have been having second thoughts about going up to black belt, though. [:(] All my master does is show me how to move furniture and plants around. I guess if I become highly skilled at this art, I can move furniture around swiftly so my opponent falls over them. Ah...that is effective! [:O] -RoadDog
Link Posted: 4/1/2001 12:01:39 AM EDT
Hey Jewbroni, I didn't mean to nitpic you to death. Sometimes I just know a subject and well...
Link Posted: 4/1/2001 12:25:35 AM EDT
You could always try my favorite art, Schlong Foo [:)]. I'm 5'10", though, so I don't think I'm tall enough. Seriously, if you haven't studied a martial art, try taking a few lessons. I started in on Tae Kwon Do five years ago, and haven't stopped yet. It's fairly useless in a street fight or a brawl. I didn't even realize how useless until I took it! Most fights I have seen have one or two punches before it becomes a wrestling match. So the skills of TKD are limited in that respect. However, the mental conditioning that you can get, as well as the physical training, are both excellent tools to have on your side. I know I would lose a fight to a trained grappler, but against an untrained fellow I'd be more than a match. I have loads of fun competing in TKD though...one of the few forms you can beat on someone and not get significantly hurt. (although in the fat boy division I'm in you could get really hurt if you are outmatched) A Judo class is starting soon at my local community college and I plan on taking that as well. In short (since i've rambled on too long already), take something, it's better than nothing. Just make sure you stick with the arts, and never stop learning.
Link Posted: 4/1/2001 11:04:01 PM EDT
miss mag bet you can teach him a thing or two with your "GUN-FU"!
Link Posted: 4/8/2001 7:21:00 PM EDT
How about Hamster style...check out the Trey Parker movie Orgasmo and you'll see a creature called T-Rex in it that might be right up somebodies alley here. DVDA rules!!! [:X*]
Link Posted: 4/8/2001 9:23:58 PM EDT
Gracie?
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