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1/14/2017 8:11:35 PM
Posted: 1/25/2011 7:19:50 PM EST
I must have missed the memo on this change. I hear "vice" used regularly and can't remember a time when it was explained why versus is no longer to be used. Am I out of the loop?
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:25:40 PM EST
Nevermind.
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:27:52 PM EST
Tag for the joke that I am surely not in on.
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:28:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/25/2011 7:31:10 PM EST by HardShell]
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:30:36 PM EST
What about sans versus vice?
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:42:21 PM EST
Et tu, Brute?
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:45:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By ElectricSheep556:
What about sans versus vice?

Wut? "Sans," without?

Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:49:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/25/2011 7:57:20 PM EST by ColonelHurtz]
Originally Posted By geegee:
I must have missed the memo on this change. I hear "vice" used regularly and can't remember a time when it was explained why versus is no longer to be used. Am I out of the loop?


In Latin, "Vice" means "in place of". It's the ablative of vix, (change).
As an adverb, Vice means "otherwise". Versa, is the past participle of the verb Verto, meaning to turn around.
The phrase, Vice Versa or Versa Vice, means literally "otherwise turned around" or commonly, "with places exchanged".
The solo use of Vice means something different.
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:54:20 PM EST
You should have asked for adversus before you posted.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 12:17:34 AM EST
I would use verses for competition vs. vice.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 1:57:17 AM EST

Originally Posted By ColonelHurtz:
Originally Posted By geegee:
I must have missed the memo on this change. I hear "vice" used regularly and can't remember a time when it was explained why versus is no longer to be used. Am I out of the loop?


In Latin, "Vice" means "in place of". It's the ablative of vix, (change).
As an adverb, Vice means "otherwise". Versa, is the past participle of the verb Verto, meaning to turn around.
The phrase, Vice Versa or Versa Vice, means literally "otherwise turned around" or commonly, "with places exchanged".
The solo use of Vice means something different.

OP - Your original question was a bit confusing, but I think ColonelHurtz summed things up nicely. I applaud you for choosing your words with care. The abuse of our language today is both shocking and pathetic.


Link Posted: 1/26/2011 2:01:30 AM EST
OP should have looked up his question on Google or Bing, or vice versa.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 2:08:10 AM EST
Is that a new cable station dedicated to hookers and blow?
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 3:14:39 AM EST
Ego operor haud tutela
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 3:16:50 AM EST
Vice vis a vis versus?
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 3:25:54 AM EST
English - how's it work.

From the Latin, but a widely used word in English longer than anyone here has been alive.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vice


3 vice prep \ˈvīs also ˈvī-sē

Definition of VICE

: in the place of <I will preside, vice the absent chairman>; also : rather than
Origin of VICE

Latin, abl. of vicis change, alternation, stead — more at week
First Known Use: 1770


"Versus" is NOT used the same way, and implies an opposition or competition, not just an alternate, substitute, or replacement.

See "Vice President" also "Vicar."
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 3:38:21 AM EST
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 10:57:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
English - how's it work.

From the Latin, but a widely used word in English longer than anyone here has been alive.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vice


3 vice prep \ˈvīs also ˈvī-sē

Definition of VICE

: in the place of <I will preside, vice the absent chairman>; also : rather than
Origin of VICE

Latin, abl. of vicis change, alternation, stead — more at week
First Known Use: 1770


"Versus" is NOT used the same way, and implies an opposition or competition, not just an alternate, substitute, or replacement.

See "Vice President" also "Vicar."


And "viceroy".
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 10:58:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By geegee:
I must have missed the memo on this change. I hear "vice" used regularly and can't remember a time when it was explained why versus is no longer to be used. Am I out of the loop?


If you say or write "vice" instead of "versus," you are relieved of the obligation to formally notify your audience of the fact that you are a half-wit.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 10:59:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By geegee:
Originally Posted By ElectricSheep556:
What about sans versus vice?

Wut? "Sans," without?



My pants! My pants!
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 11:03:16 AM EST
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