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Posted: 5/17/2010 4:36:26 AM EDT
Was watching a show yesterday on tornados. The storm chasers head out in trucks to about maybe 1 mile out of the storm drop their load of instruments and then take off.

What if these guys had a decommissioned tank that they modify for reserach purposes and drive right into the storm. If the tan has all the weight behind it just like the military ones. Could tornado winds turn it over?
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:38:30 AM EDT
I'm going to say yes. But I am just guessing.
Entire houses turn into nothing. Yes I know a tank has all that weight concentrated into a smaller object. But still.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:40:58 AM EDT
Tornadoes have tossed locomotives around like toys. One of sufficient force would throw a tank around like a two-year old, too.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:43:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/17/2010 4:43:58 AM EDT by david_g17]
http://www.tornadoproject.com/fscale/fscale.htm

An F3 can knock a train over. The scale goes up to F6.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:43:35 AM EDT
Is it on a treadmill?
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:44:29 AM EDT
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:44:36 AM EDT
Very rarely. Look at the TIV that the storm chasers were driving into tornadoes. It was only a big pickup truck with some added protection and items to give it less wind resistance.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:44:37 AM EDT
Yes.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:44:57 AM EDT
Lets say like a decommissioned Abrams. Weighing a tad over 60 tons or so......


The tanks has a wider wheel base than a train that is on rails and possibly weighs more. I'm not saying that it can't happen. I've just never heard of it happening before.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:45:49 AM EDT
A large one? Oh Lord yes.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:45:58 AM EDT
Yes.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:46:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By atxjax:
Lets say like a decommissioned Abrams. Weighing a tad over 60 tons or so......


The tanks has a wider wheel base than a train that is on rails and possibly weighs more. I'm not saying that it can't happen. I've just never heard of it happening before.

Look up a few posts.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:46:11 AM EDT
Wow guess it can then. Pics of that would be interesting.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:47:00 AM EDT
It would have to turn its turret to counter the rotation with the commanders going with the tornado rotation .




Seriously a F4 would most likley move it , a F5 would own it.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:54:51 AM EDT
As a former operator on the M1 series I have to comment that although I have not seen it in person, and especially with the corroborating story above about Ft Hood, I believe that it is entirely possible for a tornado to wreak havoc on the 72 ton beast.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:54:58 AM EDT
Would a tank with reactive armor fair better?
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:55:58 AM EDT
Yes.


Because it has happened.

Historical facts are facts.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:56:59 AM EDT
im going with it would not end well.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:00:43 AM EDT
A Tornado would pretty much own anything in it's path.....................I have seen them demolish buildings, so a tank wouldnt be too difficult for it
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:04:07 AM EDT
They can rip asphalt pavement right up off the ground.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:04:15 AM EDT
no
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:07:24 AM EDT
Heck yes.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:08:38 AM EDT
Looks a little small but you never know.



Uploaded with ImageShack.us
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:09:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars.


Tag.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:11:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By fatboy79:
Looks a little small but you never know.

<a href="http://img375.imageshack.us/i/tornado.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img375.imageshack.us/img375/4973/tornado.jpg</a>

Uploaded with ImageShack.us


Damn, that's fugly.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:22:28 AM EDT
No definitive answer, but some knowledgeable discussion on this very topic at tanknet:

http://208.84.116.223/forums/index.php?showtopic=20160&st=0
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:32:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By atxjax:
Lets say like a decommissioned Abrams. Weighing a tad over 60 tons or so......


The tanks has a wider wheel base than a train that is on rails and possibly weighs more. I'm not saying that it can't happen. I've just never heard of it happening before.


Ahhhhh, me thinks you have yet to learn the proper respect for the bitch that Mother Nature can be.

Do not tempt her.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:35:46 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Moose:
Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars.


Tag.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I will have to dig through some boxes (I recently moved) to find my Army albums. In the meantime, I am searching for any news stories detailing the event. The stories I have found talk about the 200 helicopters that were damaged and destroyed by multiple tornados. No pics yet.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:53:35 AM EDT
Most of the time, the tank would be just fine. A direct hit by a storm with some serious winds could flip it over.

If you ever do any training involving Tanks, Bradley's, or M88's during the safety briefing they will tell you that in the event of a tornado hop in the vehicle and button up, it's the safest option if you don't have a basement to get in.

To use a tank for a tornado intercept vehicle, you would need to install side and rear skirts that you can drop down and prevent air from getting underneath the vehicle.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 5:54:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By peekay:
Is it on a treadmill?


Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:01:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By peekay:
Is it on a treadmill?

The tornado or the tank?
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:02:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By metalsaber:

Originally Posted By peekay:
Is it on a treadmill?

The tornado or the tank?
Yes.

Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:03:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.


I'd love to see the pics.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:07:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By pyro6988:
Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.


I'd love to see the pics.


Most of the pics I have are of the tornado and hail tearing through the area in front of my barracks. The tornadoes hit the base at night. I didn't get too many pics of the devastation as I was booked on a morning flight out of Austin for my brothers wedding. I'll see what I can find.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:14:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/17/2010 6:26:11 AM EDT by Storm_Tracker]

Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.

Ok,

The question needed to be considered here is "surface area". I have seen many 18 wheelers turned on their side. In fact on the 10th of May in OK I came across a few near Brahman, OK

It is easy to see why these large vehicles with lots of "surface area" fall victim to high winds. Personally I have experienced 90 - 100 + mph winds that took out some semi's on I 70 just about 4 miles after the storm passed over me.

The occupants of my Xterra thought they were going to die and were scared out of their minds. Me, I was in disbelief of what was happening and then turned my vehicle into the wind which was an RFD or rear flank downdraft. It uprooted trees and broke many in half right near my vehicle. The occupants on the receiving side of the vehicle said the windows and doors felt like they were bending inward and threw pillows and blankets over their heads.

Anyways all of that aside. Not to doubt DV8 as he was there and saw it. I find it hard to believe that something like an Abrahams tank would fall victim to a tornado. Reason being is it sits low to the ground is somewhat aerodynamic, weighs several tons, and the wheel or track base is very wide.

I would be interested to know if it rolled them or just moved them so slightly. Also any pictures you may have of this would be waaaayyyy awesome and would go really far in conversation in the "stormchaser" hangouts and chat rooms.

Back to surface area. If you are in a tornado despite what the "experts" tell you dotn get out of yoru car and lay in a fucking ditch. Get out of its way! Drive and drive fast to get out of its path. Also I have been stuck in the mud and withstood high winds that had me afraid for my life. Truth be told though I was in a steel cage with some good protection. My other option was "nothing" protecting me. If there is NO other option and a direct hit is imminent and there is no avoiding it, then pick the ditch option, get lower than the ground around you, dont drown and keep your head covered and low so you are not injured by debris.

Surface area on Semi's, Trains, road signs etc is extreme. Your vehicle also can gain surface area with debris piling up on the side of it. This will increase your surface area and possibly start a roll of your vehicle which is what you dont want.

Remember to turn the vehicle into the wind if you are in a safe place out of the path of the tornado. This will cut down drastically on your surface area.

My 2c
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:22:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DernHumpus:
Very rarely. Look at the TIV that the storm chasers were driving into tornadoes. It was only a big pickup truck with some added protection and items to give it less wind resistance.
The Dominator is a suburban with a light metal shell with about 3/8's inch of Rino Lining on the outside. I have inspected it rather thoroughly. The trick to it is that there is a rubber gasket around the outside lower bottom flange. The thinking here is to lower the vehicle through hydraulic shocks so that the wind wont get up under neath of it. When wind gets underneath your vehicle is when it becomes dangerous and can roll you. The Dominator weighs about 8k lbs.

The TIV on the other hand is much more heavier. It also has outriggers used to steady it in the event of a tornado interception. It does not have a gasket to keep wind from getting underneath it.

They are fun to watch in and around storms.

Recently they both did a Myth Busters show using a jets back wash (?) where the Dominator withstood a 245 mph wind I was told. I have not seen it. The TIV withstood a little less and it bent one of the outriggers.


Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:25:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Storm_Tracker:

Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.

Ok,

The question needed to be considered here is "surface area". I have seen many 18 wheelers turned on their side. In fact on the 10th of May in OK I came across a few near Brahman, OK

It is easy to see why these large vehicles with lots of "surface area" fall victim to high winds. Personally I have experienced 90 - 100 + mph winds that took out some semi's on I 70 just about 4 miles after the storm passed over me.

The occupants of my Xterra thought they were going to die and were scared out of their minds. Me, I was in disbelief of what was happening and then turned my vehicle into the wind which was an RFD or rear flank downdraft. It uprooted trees and broke many in half right near my vehicle. The occupants on the receiving side of the vehiclke said the windows and doors felt like they were bending inward and threw pillows and blankets over their heads.

Anyways all of that aside. Not to doubt DV8 as he was there and saw it. I find it hard to believe that something like an Abrahams tank would fall victim to a tornado. Reason being is it sits low to the ground is somewhat aerodynamic, weighs several tons, and the wheel or track base is very wide.

I would be interested to know if it rolled them or just moved them so slightly. Also any pictures you may have of this would be waaaayyyy awesome and would go really far in conversation in the "stormchaser" hangouts and chat rooms.

Back to surface area. If you are in a tornado despite what the "experts" tell you dotn get out of yoru car and lay in a fucking ditch. Get out of its way! Drive and drive fast to get out of its path. Also I have been stuck in the mud and withstood high winds that had me afraid for my life. Truth be told though I was in a steel cage with some good protection. My other option was "nothing" protecting me.

Surface area on Semi's, Trains, road signs etc is extreme. Your vehicle also can gain surface area with debris piling up on the side of it. This will increase your surface area and possibly start a roll of your vehicle which is what you dont want.

Remember to turn the vehicle into the wind if you are in a safe place out of the path of the tornado. This will cut down drastically on your surface area.

My 2c



The pics were all over the news and in the papers for a week or so after the tornado. The tornadoes were F2's and F3's IIRC and hit Ft. Hood on May 13, 1989.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:35:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By Storm_Tracker:

Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.

Ok,

The question needed to be considered here is "surface area". I have seen many 18 wheelers turned on their side. In fact on the 10th of May in OK I came across a few near Brahman, OK

It is easy to see why these large vehicles with lots of "surface area" fall victim to high winds. Personally I have experienced 90 - 100 + mph winds that took out some semi's on I 70 just about 4 miles after the storm passed over me.

The occupants of my Xterra thought they were going to die and were scared out of their minds. Me, I was in disbelief of what was happening and then turned my vehicle into the wind which was an RFD or rear flank downdraft. It uprooted trees and broke many in half right near my vehicle. The occupants on the receiving side of the vehiclke said the windows and doors felt like they were bending inward and threw pillows and blankets over their heads.

Anyways all of that aside. Not to doubt DV8 as he was there and saw it. I find it hard to believe that something like an Abrahams tank would fall victim to a tornado. Reason being is it sits low to the ground is somewhat aerodynamic, weighs several tons, and the wheel or track base is very wide.

I would be interested to know if it rolled them or just moved them so slightly. Also any pictures you may have of this would be waaaayyyy awesome and would go really far in conversation in the "stormchaser" hangouts and chat rooms.

Back to surface area. If you are in a tornado despite what the "experts" tell you dotn get out of yoru car and lay in a fucking ditch. Get out of its way! Drive and drive fast to get out of its path. Also I have been stuck in the mud and withstood high winds that had me afraid for my life. Truth be told though I was in a steel cage with some good protection. My other option was "nothing" protecting me.

Surface area on Semi's, Trains, road signs etc is extreme. Your vehicle also can gain surface area with debris piling up on the side of it. This will increase your surface area and possibly start a roll of your vehicle which is what you dont want.

Remember to turn the vehicle into the wind if you are in a safe place out of the path of the tornado. This will cut down drastically on your surface area.

My 2c



The pics were all over the news and in the papers for a week or so after the tornado. The tornadoes were F2's and F3's IIRC and hit Ft. Hood on May 13, 1989.

Well I'm sure there are some chasers who have been in the biz longer than me that should remember this. On another note I just looked up the weight of an Abrahams tank and it is like 67 tons... lol

An F3 wind is like 150 - 200 mph.

Ill run a post over on the stormchaser BBS and see what if any more info I can get. Thanks DV8


Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:35:27 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DernHumpus:
Very rarely. Look at the TIV that the storm chasers were driving into tornadoes. It was only a big pickup truck with some added protection and items to give it less wind resistance.


LOL... TIV is a piece of shit, and has never encountered a powerful tornado. I think they try to stay away from anything over 140.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:37:45 AM EDT
Look what a tornado did to Dorethy and Toto.


Go from there.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:43:48 AM EDT
Here is a pic just for fun of a tornado I intercepted in late April of this year in the TX panhandle.

This will be one I will always remember, due to the storms speed - 20kt and its longevity, about 15 minutes or more.

Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:47:05 AM EDT
Interesting. When I was in Texas, I thought I wanted a storm shelter made up of something along the lines of an M113 anchored firmly to the ground, using the lifting points and some very thick cable buried deep underground. I figured it'd be cool to hop-in and watch the tornado through the viewing ports.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:58:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By atxjax:
Lets say like a decommissioned Abrams. Weighing a tad over 60 tons or so......


The tanks has a wider wheel base than a train that is on rails and possibly weighs more. I'm not saying that it can't happen. I've just never heard of it happening before.

A single modern locomotive weighs 200 tons just by its self and I have seen pics of them not only blown over but blown clear of the tracks.

I have no doubt given the right circumstances a tank would be moved.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:03:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By peekay:
Is it on a treadmill?


Nope, turntable.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:04:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By metalsaber:

Originally Posted By peekay:
Is it on a treadmill?

The tornado or the tank?


Tornado on a treadmill?


The HORROR!!!!!
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:05:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KS-Diesel:
Originally Posted By atxjax:
Lets say like a decommissioned Abrams. Weighing a tad over 60 tons or so......


The tanks has a wider wheel base than a train that is on rails and possibly weighs more. I'm not saying that it can't happen. I've just never heard of it happening before.

A single modern locomotive weighs 200 tons just by its self and I have seen pics of them not only blown over but blown clear of the tracks.

I have no doubt given the right circumstances a tank would be moved.

surface area
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:15:08 AM EDT
An F5 can have 300 MPH winds and move as slow as 10 mph.

It can rip the topsoil from the ground 18" deep.

A tank caught in one of those would be rolled into a 20ft ball of tank, dirt, fence and other debris.
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:26:59 AM EDT
So essentially its a question of tank vs. mother nature.



No contest.

Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:28:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/17/2010 7:29:46 AM EDT by cookhj]
Originally Posted By sherrick13:
Originally Posted By metalsaber:

Originally Posted By peekay:
Is it on a treadmill?

The tornado or the tank?


Tornado on a treadmill?

The HORROR!!!!!



Is this as bad as dividing by zero?

Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:28:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.


Was it early in the year 89? I got there in october 89 and didn't see any of that

Link Posted: 5/17/2010 7:29:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Alex_F:
Originally Posted By DV8:
In 1989, 7 tornados devastated Ft. Hood, TX. I was there and I still have pics somewhere. Tanks were tossed around like matchbox cars. Trains and rail cars at the rail head were strewn about. Helicopters and other aircraft were ripped from their tie downs and sent flying across the base.

So, I would say yes, a tornado can indeed throw a tank around.


Was it early in the year 89? I got there in october 89 and didn't see any of that



May 13, 1989 IIRC.
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