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fp1201
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Posted: 8/17/2011 10:08:44 PM
I have a marvelous opportunity to return to College to pursuit Engineering; of course there's all sorts of engineering fields, my problem is difficulty with math. (eventually I get it, just have to work extraordinarily hard and often repeat the course)
Which "Engineering" field has the least intensive mathematics requirements?

P.S. Please don't say "Social Engineering" we have enough of that shit already.
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Posted: 8/17/2011 10:52:58 PM
As far as I know ALL engineering requires several years of calculus and matrix manipulation,and general engineering and then it's off to the specialty courses.

I think it's all pretty much the same for math
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Posted: 8/17/2011 10:56:30 PM
train

but really civil is less heavy in physics. But it requires just as much math and calculations for the degree and real world.


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Posted: 8/17/2011 10:58:17 PM
[Last Edit: 8/17/2011 10:59:30 PM by ar-jedi]
Originally Posted By fp1201:
Which "Engineering" field has the least intensive mathematics requirements?

as an ME/EE i would have to say that ChemE is IMHO *probably* the least math intensive HOWEVER you are making a huge tradeoff –– there is a ton more memorization in ChemE. in any case you are taking 3 semesters of calc, 1 semester of diff-eq, 1 semester of linear algebra, and 1 semester of something else to hose up your GPA.

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tommyrich
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Posted: 8/17/2011 10:58:45 PM
Many years ago when I was in the ME program at a major university it was Calc I (5hrs), Calc II(5 hrs), Calc III(3 hrs), Diff Eq(3 hrs). That was the standard for all engineering majors. I think EE's had more math but that was pretty much it for ME's. Times have changed, so now I don't know for sure.
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Posted: 8/17/2011 11:07:19 PM
Have you considered Engineering Tech degrees? I'm not too sure on the specifics of them, but they are supposed to be a bit easier to obtain.
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Posted: 8/18/2011 8:09:17 AM
Originally Posted By fp1201:
I have a marvelous opportunity to return to College to pursuit Engineering; of course there's all sorts of engineering fields, my problem is difficulty with math. (eventually I get it, just have to work extraordinarily hard and often repeat the course)
Which "Engineering" field has the least intensive mathematics requirements?

P.S. Please don't say "Social Engineering" we have enough of that shit already.


I don't know that there is one more than the other, all "real" (ABET accredited) engineering degrees should have the basic recipe of Calc I, II, and III, Diff Eq and maybe (and I would recommend this because my program didn't require it) Linear Algebra. I am an ME, had to do plenty...but I know the EE guys had to do Laplace Transformations a lot more...but here's the catch, when you are doing those as much as they were (and the fact that you GOT to that level) the math isn't the hard part.

My advice? TRY Calc I and Physics together, plan on LOTS of homework (when I had a normal load, 12-15 hrs, it was about 25-30 hrs of homework a week). See if you can do those, they aren't the weed-out classes "usually" (I found Calc II and on a lesser level Chemistry were in my school) but they are still tough enough to tell you if you can do it.

If they feel impossible, rethink being in the engineering field. There are lots of other things to do as well.

What is your personal reason for an engineering education? Answer here and some of us may be able to help you understand whether or not it is really what you think it it.

FWIW, I don't use intense math at my "real" engineering job, but I sure as hell need to know the concepts of higher math in order to make assumptions and decisions. Some other engineers do Calculus a lot of times while some engineering graduates don't calculate anything at all (or engineer anything!) –– YMMV.
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Posted: 8/18/2011 9:14:11 AM
[Last Edit: 8/18/2011 9:21:35 AM by Captain_Morgan]
I would check out Industrial Engineering. To be honest, I'm not really sure what they do (I'm ME), but when I took my PE, the IE section looked more like a cross between engineering and management.

You may also want to look into Construction Management, as that was always paired up with some of our engineering courses. I'd say the only issue there is that construction has really slowed lately.

I would like to note that I'm only speaking for degrees that were offered at LSU, so there may not be some overlap.



ETA: Here is a curriculum guide for Environmental Engineering (part of Civil Engineering):


I don't see Calc 3 on there, but IMO Calc 3 was easier than Calc 2.

It appears that it's the same case with Industrial Engineering:


As you can see, Construction Management is much less intense on math, but is part of the Industrial Engineering College (at LSU):

fp1201
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Posted: 8/18/2011 10:13:21 PM
I'll try and explain what's going on:
The VA has offered to send me to a well respected University under Vocational Rehabilitation. (Doctors determined that continuing the work I do will be detrimental to my health due to sever ostio & ortho problems)
I have always been very mechanically minded, and able to make, modify, or repair what ever crosses my daily path.
Household plumbing, electrical, HVAC is very easy to me. "Seeing things" in the mind is easy, many of the things I build are done in my mind on the fly and for the most part things turn out just the way they should. Here lately I've been learning to operate a metal Lathe and have taught myself to welds (stick, mig, and oxy/acetylene) Asking people in the know "how" to do something goes a long ways when learning on your own.
It took me almost four years to earn a A.S. in Math/Science as the first two years were learning what I should have learned in High School, that was 15 years ago. College Algebra and Statistics was as high as I went with mathematics.
It was suggested (based on aptitude tests and interviews) that I pursuit "Engineering" because I like to design & build.
I'm not into carpentry or construction, drawings are what you'd see on a bar napkin (well I can do better when I need to) but I really don't have architecture skills beyond basic stuff.
I currently work for the Army, and would like to continue to; after being certified and re-certified to prepare HAZMAT shipments, I've become interested in Ammunition Quality Assurance, The Army is begging for Engineers in dozens of areas, and while I DO NOT subscribe to this concept, the reality is that it doesn't matter as much what you know as what's on paper.
I realize that going to school is about learning to do things you don't know how to do, but I think you should know something before taking on a course.
The Lord is my Sheppard, and I his Sheepdog;
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Posted: 8/19/2011 3:28:11 PM
Well, I really wish you luck in your endeavors. To me, it sounds like you'd best be suited for a degree in Mechanical Engineering (I'm a ME, so I might be a little biased). I think you'll enjoy the field based on what you say.

However, I can't sugarcoat the fact that if you think you're going to stumble on the math, you probably won't do well. You say that you can get through it when you put your time into it. Do you have to be able to finish the course in 4 years? If not, it might be a good option to try and spread it out so that the math doesn't bog you down at first. All of my upper level courses relied heavily on my earlier math courses, so a strong understanding is key.

I think you should give ME (or any of the other engineering curricula) a crack. If you don't at least give it a shot, you'll never know and wish you did. If it doesn't work out, you can always apply the credits you earned in another field.
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Posted: 8/20/2011 11:13:10 AM
Just about every engineering degree requires a full year of calculus and then some differential equations.

Even the MEs.

EEs are buried in math, typically needing 4 years of college math, up to conformal mapping.

If you get an 'T' degree it will cost you a lot of money over the long run over a straight BS.

Many of the 4-year schools have dropped T degrees under pressure from the accreditation agencies.

If you are not good at math, investigate something besides engineering.

It is a large part of engineering.





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Posted: 8/20/2011 3:15:40 PM
I did some more checking around on Engineering Tech degrees, and from what I've seen, the highest level of math needed is Calc II. A plain engineering degree would have you take Calc I-III, Diff Eq, and Linear Algebra. So that would save you 3 math classes. Definitely check for ABET accreditation though.
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Posted: 8/20/2011 3:36:41 PM
[Last Edit: 8/20/2011 3:37:36 PM by Justin-Kase]
Knock out Cal 1-3 and physics at a junior college, it will (probably) be less intense and won't hurt your GPA from where you graduate if you fail/bomb the course the first time. Not to mention it's cheaper. You'll still have to take Diff EQ and upper level physics at a 4 year school, but it doesn't necessarily have to be the school you graduate from, it just has to transfer.


Also some professors are better teachers than others and some are more forgiving in grading. Research who and where would be the best place to go. I think theres a rate my professor .com or something if not fifty other similar sites that would be worth investigating.

Work smarter not harder, don't be afraid to hire a tutor, get into study groups with smart people whenever possible, and you can achieve your goal if you're willing to do the work.
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Posted: 8/21/2011 1:11:16 AM
I don't know which engineering is math-lite, but I can tell you it damn sure isn't Naval Engineering, that's for sure.
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Posted: 8/22/2011 9:50:45 PM
[Last Edit: 8/22/2011 9:51:26 PM by BigChap]
Originally Posted By tommyrich:
Many years ago when I was in the ME program at a major university it was Calc I (5hrs), Calc II(5 hrs), Calc III(3 hrs), Diff Eq(3 hrs). That was the standard for all engineering majors. I think EE's had more math but that was pretty much it for ME's. Times have changed, so now I don't know for sure.


+1

Just began Diff EQ at my university. Next is linear algebra. Things evidently haven't changed much.

Due to your prior knowledge (and interest) in welding, machining, and insight in to design, try Mechanical. I think you'd like it.
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Posted: 8/22/2011 10:16:28 PM
Originally Posted By BigChap:
Originally Posted By tommyrich:
Many years ago when I was in the ME program at a major university it was Calc I (5hrs), Calc II(5 hrs), Calc III(3 hrs), Diff Eq(3 hrs). That was the standard for all engineering majors. I think EE's had more math but that was pretty much it for ME's. Times have changed, so now I don't know for sure.


+1

Just began Diff EQ at my university. Next is linear algebra. Things evidently haven't changed much.

Due to your prior knowledge (and interest) in welding, machining, and insight in to design, try Mechanical. I think you'd like it.


I'm still leaning towards Mechanical, I suppose you can learn most anything if you keep at it long enough.... focusing almost exclusivly on math will be the only way to get through it.
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BigChap
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Posted: 8/22/2011 11:00:33 PM
Originally Posted By fp1201:
Originally Posted By BigChap:
Originally Posted By tommyrich:
Many years ago when I was in the ME program at a major university it was Calc I (5hrs), Calc II(5 hrs), Calc III(3 hrs), Diff Eq(3 hrs). That was the standard for all engineering majors. I think EE's had more math but that was pretty much it for ME's. Times have changed, so now I don't know for sure.


+1

Just began Diff EQ at my university. Next is linear algebra. Things evidently haven't changed much.

Due to your prior knowledge (and interest) in welding, machining, and insight in to design, try Mechanical. I think you'd like it.


I'm still leaning towards Mechanical, I suppose you can learn most anything if you keep at it long enough.... focusing almost exclusivly on math will be the only way to get through it.


Keep at it. It's a difficult degree to earn, but VERY rewarding. I hated math in high school, so much that I decided not to go to college for three years afterwards. The only thing I wanted was an engineering degree, but didn't think I could hack the math, as I struggled so much with it. As of now, I'm three years in to the program, have learned to love math, and well on the way to doing what I want. Take that first step and keep pushin.

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Posted: 8/23/2011 12:29:18 AM
Originally Posted By fp1201:
I'll try and explain what's going on:
The VA has offered to send me to a well respected University under Vocational Rehabilitation. (Doctors determined that continuing the work I do will be detrimental to my health due to sever ostio & ortho problems)
I have always been very mechanically minded, and able to make, modify, or repair what ever crosses my daily path.
Household plumbing, electrical, HVAC is very easy to me. "Seeing things" in the mind is easy, many of the things I build are done in my mind on the fly and for the most part things turn out just the way they should. Here lately I've been learning to operate a metal Lathe and have taught myself to welds (stick, mig, and oxy/acetylene) Asking people in the know "how" to do something goes a long ways when learning on your own.
It took me almost four years to earn a A.S. in Math/Science as the first two years were learning what I should have learned in High School, that was 15 years ago. College Algebra and Statistics was as high as I went with mathematics.
It was suggested (based on aptitude tests and interviews) that I pursuit "Engineering" because I like to design & build.
I'm not into carpentry or construction, drawings are what you'd see on a bar napkin (well I can do better when I need to) but I really don't have architecture skills beyond basic stuff.
I currently work for the Army, and would like to continue to; after being certified and re-certified to prepare HAZMAT shipments, I've become interested in Ammunition Quality Assurance, The Army is begging for Engineers in dozens of areas, and while I DO NOT subscribe to this concept, the reality is that it doesn't matter as much what you know as what's on paper.
I realize that going to school is about learning to do things you don't know how to do, but I think you should know something before taking on a course.


if you are interested in continuing work with munitions and hazardous materials, you could look into a B.S. in environmental science or chemistry. But your best bet would be to go with a civil/environmental or chemical engineering program. Just remember that you are going to school to learn and instructors are there to teach you. If you take in the material one day at a time, maintain a good study schedule, and do your best i really don't see any reason someone would not be able to finish ANY degree program.

that being said, IMO the easiest route would be completing a B.S. in environmental science and then go to grad school for an M.S. in environmental engineering. Most mid level engineering positions will seek candidates that have at least partially completed a masters.

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Posted: 8/23/2011 11:46:16 PM
Most everything has been covered so I'll just add an additional $0.02. I started in aeronautical engineering but my mind was having trouble grasping all of the math involved in dynamics, plus aero required an additional semester of calculus. I ended up in Civil Engineering because my mind has much less problem(s) grasping statics. Eventually degreed in structural engineering with minor in geotechnical.

Civil, depending on the college's offerings, can go many directions. From Purdue's C.E. website, the undergrad can pursue "nine academic engineering specialty groups, architectural engineering, construction engineering, environmental engineering, geomatics engineering, geotechnical engineering, hydraulic and hydrologic engineering, materials engineering, structural engineering, and transportation engineering." All have varying degrees of math, but the hydraulics and possibly materials would probably have the most, with structural being up there as well.

My point is that you also need to look within an engineering field and determine which types of math to avoid your mind has the most trouble working with.

-bbenson9
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Posted: 8/24/2011 5:30:03 PM
I worked with an EE who said the Eng. majors who couldn't do the math in EE=>Civil. Like the guy above said, statics is easier than dynamics.
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Posted: 8/24/2011 8:11:06 PM
Civil Engineers may may a bit less than other engineers, but it isn't like they're going to starve either. The local job office has openings for civil engineers making 50k to start. 50k for a kid just out of college with no wife or kids is fantastic money. Get on with a city planning office and you'll never have to worry about being downsized either.
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Posted: 8/24/2011 8:51:32 PM
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Have you considered Engineering Tech degrees? I'm not too sure on the specifics of them, but they are supposed to be a bit easier to obtain.


This is true.

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Posted: 8/27/2011 11:17:30 PM
I won't say I can do it, but some things sink in faster than others...seems like it wasn't until after I graduated from jr. college that I grasped the little bit of math that I studied.
The plan is to focus almost exclusively on mathematics making it virtually the only class.
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Posted: 8/28/2011 2:25:42 PM
software
Pick up that can.
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Posted: 8/29/2011 1:37:08 AM
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
software


I had to take one programming class in pursuit of my ME degree, and nearly unloaded a full tube of buckshot on my computer. Software is, by far, the most frustrating thing I have every come across. Ever. I hate it.

Some people love it, I hate it. My $0.02
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Posted: 8/29/2011 7:29:51 AM

Originally Posted By Chapman:
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
software


I had to take one programming class in pursuit of my ME degree, and nearly unloaded a full tube of buckshot on my computer. Software is, by far, the most frustrating thing I have every come across. Ever. I hate it.

Some people love it, I hate it. My $0.02
Aww, it's boring, but not difficult.

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Posted: 8/29/2011 10:14:12 AM
Originally Posted By azych:

Originally Posted By Chapman:
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
software


I had to take one programming class in pursuit of my ME degree, and nearly unloaded a full tube of buckshot on my computer. Software is, by far, the most frustrating thing I have every come across. Ever. I hate it.

Some people love it, I hate it. My $0.02
Aww, it's boring, but not difficult.



Computer Science was my first major: two years of COBOL. FORTRAN, and a couple others let me to the conclusion that as a programmer I SUCK!
At that time what I was really interested in was the internet and web pages. (keep in mind this was at a time when a 28.8 modem and 486 processer was considered fast!)
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Posted: 8/31/2011 2:35:56 PM
Imaginary Industrial Engineering
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Posted: 8/31/2011 2:40:54 PM
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
software


Not true, I was required to take Calc I - III, Differential Equations, and Matrix Algebra as well as some statistics courses.

Maybe not as math heavy as some, but it's there. It may vary by university.
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Posted: 8/31/2011 2:45:18 PM
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 2:46:47 PM by Andr0id]
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
software


Originally Posted By skin290:

I don't know that there is one more than the other, all "real" (ABET accredited) engineering degrees should have the basic recipe of Calc I, II, and III, Diff Eq and maybe (and I would recommend this because my program didn't require it) Linear Algebra.

FWIW, I don't use intense math at my "real" engineering job, but I sure as hell need to know the concepts of higher math in order to make assumptions and decisions. Some other engineers do Calculus a lot of times while some engineering graduates don't calculate anything at all (or engineer anything!) –– YMMV.


No, even a Computer Science degree requires all this as well as some discrete math even though I only add ones and zeros now.

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Posted: 8/31/2011 5:57:03 PM

Originally Posted By Andr0id:
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
software


Originally Posted By skin290:

I don't know that there is one more than the other, all "real" (ABET accredited) engineering degrees should have the basic recipe of Calc I, II, and III, Diff Eq and maybe (and I would recommend this because my program didn't require it) Linear Algebra.

FWIW, I don't use intense math at my "real" engineering job, but I sure as hell need to know the concepts of higher math in order to make assumptions and decisions. Some other engineers do Calculus a lot of times while some engineering graduates don't calculate anything at all (or engineer anything!) –– YMMV.


No, even a Computer Science degree requires all this as well as some discrete math even though I only add ones and zeros now.

Sure it requires the basics ... he asked for least intensive math though.

Also I'm not suggesting it's any easier. Compsci education has hells all of its own that can compete for difficulty with any of the more advanced math other engineers might have to take.
Pick up that can.
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Posted: 9/2/2011 10:00:34 AM
I had to do so much math for my EE degree I ended up with a supplementary major in applied math. Off the top of my head I remember taking:
Calc 1/2/3
DiffEq
Linear Algebra
Complex Variables
Partial DIffEq and Boundary Value Problems

And of course all the insane math intensive EE classes (DSP and emag especially)



In my real job the hardest math I have to do is 10*log(x) though. Yay for specializing in RF!
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Posted: 9/4/2011 4:19:16 PM

Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By fp1201:
Which "Engineering" field has the least intensive mathematics requirements?

as an ME/EE i would have to say that ChemE is IMHO *probably* the least math intensive HOWEVER you are making a huge tradeoff –– there is a ton more memorization in ChemE. in any case you are taking 3 semesters of calc, 1 semester of diff-eq, 1 semester of linear algebra, and 1 semester of something else to hose up your GPA.

ar-jedi

No way. Heat transfer? If you suck at PDEs, you won't make it through heat transfer. 2 semesters of DEs, the P is for Partial.



Swivel Engineering (Civil) and Imaginary (Industrial) Engineering are the weakest in math. Che, M and E are all the same in the math.

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Posted: 9/4/2011 4:31:57 PM
I just got into the oil and gas industry and the folks with drilling and mining engineering degrees aren't too superb with their mathematics.
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Posted: 9/10/2011 1:21:07 AM
Originally Posted By dog-meat:

Originally Posted By Andr0id:
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
software


Originally Posted By skin290:

I don't know that there is one more than the other, all "real" (ABET accredited) engineering degrees should have the basic recipe of Calc I, II, and III, Diff Eq and maybe (and I would recommend this because my program didn't require it) Linear Algebra.

FWIW, I don't use intense math at my "real" engineering job, but I sure as hell need to know the concepts of higher math in order to make assumptions and decisions. Some other engineers do Calculus a lot of times while some engineering graduates don't calculate anything at all (or engineer anything!) –– YMMV.


No, even a Computer Science degree requires all this as well as some discrete math even though I only add ones and zeros now.

Sure it requires the basics ... he asked for least intensive math though.

Also I'm not suggesting it's any easier. Compsci education has hells all of its own that can compete for difficulty with any of the more advanced math other engineers might have to take.


Computer Science *is* math.

If you don't like math, don't even dream of working on a CS degree.
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Posted: 9/10/2011 1:43:57 PM
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By fp1201:
Which "Engineering" field has the least intensive mathematics requirements?

as an ME/EE i would have to say that ChemE is IMHO *probably* the least math intensive HOWEVER you are making a huge tradeoff –– there is a ton more memorization in ChemE. in any case you are taking 3 semesters of calc, 1 semester of diff-eq, 1 semester of linear algebra, and 1 semester of something else to hose up your GPA.

ar-jedi

No way. Heat transfer? If you suck at PDEs, you won't make it through heat transfer. 2 semesters of DEs, the P is for Partial.



Swivel Engineering (Civil) and Imaginary (Industrial) Engineering are the weakest in math. Che, M and E are all the same in the math.



If you're even remotely interested in aero or ocean engineering you can add in vector geometry and vector calc to that list of GPA ballkickers.

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Posted: 9/10/2011 4:58:29 PM
Originally Posted By RonnieJamesDioFan:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By fp1201:
Which "Engineering" field has the least intensive mathematics requirements?

as an ME/EE i would have to say that ChemE is IMHO *probably* the least math intensive HOWEVER you are making a huge tradeoff –– there is a ton more memorization in ChemE. in any case you are taking 3 semesters of calc, 1 semester of diff-eq, 1 semester of linear algebra, and 1 semester of something else to hose up your GPA.

ar-jedi

No way. Heat transfer? If you suck at PDEs, you won't make it through heat transfer. 2 semesters of DEs, the P is for Partial.



Swivel Engineering (Civil) and Imaginary (Industrial) Engineering are the weakest in math. Che, M and E are all the same in the math.



If you're even remotely interested in aero or ocean engineering you can add in vector geometry and vector calc to that list of GPA ballkickers.



I've heard that Aerospace Engineers need to take tensor calculus.
uncle_big_green
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Posted: 9/16/2011 8:44:19 PM
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Just about every engineering degree requires a full year of calculus and then some differential equations.

Even the MEs.

EEs are buried in math, typically needing 4 years of college math, up to conformal mapping.

If you get an 'T' degree it will cost you a lot of money over the long run over a straight BS.

Many of the 4-year schools have dropped T degrees under pressure from the accreditation agencies.

If you are not good at math, investigate something besides engineering.

It is a large part of engineering.







Did you go through an engineering program? This doesn't sound quite right to me.
uncle_big_green
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Posted: 9/16/2011 8:52:22 PM
[Last Edit: 9/16/2011 8:53:51 PM by uncle_big_green]
Here is what my BSME required from the math department (all of these were taken before my school switched from quarters to semesters):
Calcs 1,2 3,4
Linear Algebra
Differential Equations
Statistics and Probability

My program also had a numerical methods (applied mathematics) class and a couple of others that were mathematically intensive (moreso than the rest). Part of being decent at math is not letting it intimidate you.
NoZombies
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Posted: 9/16/2011 9:07:02 PM

Computer Science *is* math.

If you don't like math, don't even dream of working on a CS degree.


this
ButterBacon
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Posted: 9/19/2011 6:11:29 PM
It seems like Civil is one of the least math intensive. Although Diff Eq is required to get a BS in CE, at my school it is not a pre-req for any of their classes. Some people don't take Diff Eq until a semester or two before graduating. I'm an ME and it is a pre-req for pretty much all of my core classes.
skipsan
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Posted: 9/27/2011 11:04:54 AM
ABET accredits classical Engineering (BSME, BSEE, etc) as well as Engineering Technology (BSMET, BSEET, etc) programs. They are accredited to similar but different requirements. The pure math requirements for Technology programs are significantly less than for classical ebgineering programs and the Technology programs do not require calculus-based physics in contrast to classical engineering programs. Some of the best schools in the countey offer both ET and classical engineering programs. Purdue and Texas A&M for example.

The curriculum requirements as well as the schools which offer ET programs are presented at www.abet.org. Click your way to what you're loking for. You'll find that right now, that ET does not REQUIRE any calculus courses due to a screw-up. Only two courses beyond college algebra which could be statistics, or linear algebra, or whatever. That will probably be changed back in the next couple of years.

Data shows the ET starting salaries are compareable with those with classic engineering, with industrial demand also being comparable. There are some limitations, however, with ET degrees. Example: the .gov will NOT hire ET grads into full engeering positions right out of school, and some companies (Boeing for instance) will not hire ET grads into all of their technical departments. Most, but not all.
fp1201
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Posted: 9/29/2011 7:45:59 PM
Originally Posted By uncle_big_green:
Here is what my BSME required from the math department (all of these were taken before my school switched from quarters to semesters):
Calcs 1,2 3,4
Linear Algebra
Differential Equations
Statistics and Probability

My program also had a numerical methods (applied mathematics) class and a couple of others that were mathematically intensive (moreso than the rest). Part of being decent at math is not letting it intimidate you.

Easier said than done; that said if you stay after it and do all the homework/labs/etc. I still wondered if I'd even pass.

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smite
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Posted: 10/1/2011 12:18:20 AM
i figured i should add my experience to this thread after graduating in may with a BS in Robotics Engineering, a fusion of Mechanical, Electrical, and Computer Science.

the math courses i specifically took would be:
Calc III, IV (placed out of I and II through AP Calc in High School)
Differential Equations
Discrete Math
Linear Algebra

The Robotics program also included a bunch of courses from the three main disciplines, and between them, EE had the most "oh my god, i had no idea my brain could hurt in this many ways at once" math, followed to a much lesser extent by the ME courses, and the CS courses tended to be more logic based. once you got the low level ideas, such as how memory is used and manipulated, the highlevel software engineering problems were a lot easier to approach. of course, i didn't get into anything rediculous like the grad-level Artificial Intelligence courses, but i don't really need that to make an arm pick up some block and sort them... (no skynet yet...)

i went to Worcester Polytechnic Institute, which is most unfortunately located in the crap-hole that is Worcester, Massachusetts... the campus area is nice, but two blocks in the wrong direction and it gets sketchy really quick.



OKZJ
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Posted: 10/1/2011 11:11:44 PM
Yup. My time spent getting my ChemE degree was a lot of things. Light on math was not one of them.
angelfire
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Posted: 10/1/2011 11:24:11 PM
[Last Edit: 10/1/2011 11:25:10 PM by angelfire]
Some systems and network engineering is less traumatic than some of the engineering maths related to Mechanical/ Electrical /Structural/ Metallurgical/Civil /)OPTICS/NASTRAN/PATRAN. Those sub atomic particle guys are freaks.
They are more computer based.
You won't have to get into strengths and materials or fluid dynamics. I could never get my head around the stuff Sparkies do. Bless their hearts.
Regardless, you are going to need calculus to get through physics and chemistry requirements.

Do your self a favor. Take pre-calc and an english with some easy electives. Set up study groups and ask for help.
Move into trig. Then go for Calc. Most colleges use Calculus as a weeder class. Most places won't hire you without a 3.0. So commit to it.
Then tackle Chem and then Physics. It will make those so much easier.
D233
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Posted: 10/1/2011 11:32:24 PM
[Last Edit: 10/1/2011 11:33:17 PM by D233]




J/K... good luck in whichever specialty you pursue.
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MXandSXracer21
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Posted: 10/3/2011 12:39:27 AM
Seems like a degree in Mechanical Engineering suit you pretty well. However, if you want something with less math, it seems like Industrial Engineering has one less math class than ME, EE, etc. at my university.

If Math is not your strong point, consider hiring a good math tutor. It will be worth it's weight in gold if you are shooting for A's and B's in you calculus classes. For the most part, your engineering classes revolve around algebraic concepts.
shoff14
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Posted: 10/8/2011 12:47:58 AM
Originally Posted By skipsan:
ABET accredits classical Engineering (BSME, BSEE, etc) as well as Engineering Technology (BSMET, BSEET, etc) programs. They are accredited to similar but different requirements. The pure math requirements for Technology programs are significantly less than for classical ebgineering programs and the Technology programs do not require calculus-based physics in contrast to classical engineering programs. Some of the best schools in the countey offer both ET and classical engineering programs. Purdue and Texas A&M for example.

The curriculum requirements as well as the schools which offer ET programs are presented at www.abet.org. Click your way to what you're loking for. You'll find that right now, that ET does not REQUIRE any calculus courses due to a screw-up. Only two courses beyond college algebra which could be statistics, or linear algebra, or whatever. That will probably be changed back in the next couple of years.

Data shows the ET starting salaries are compareable with those with classic engineering, with industrial demand also being comparable. There are some limitations, however, with ET degrees. Example: the .gov will NOT hire ET grads into full engeering positions right out of school, and some companies (Boeing for instance) will not hire ET grads into all of their technical departments. Most, but not all.




To add a little to this. Really look into engineering technology degrees. You will be doing the same work with slightly less math. As an example, in Purdue's school of technology, MET's follow a very similar class schedule to the college of engineering ME students. However, only three calculus classes are required. The five basic engineering courses are still required along with physics that is not calculus based. Some people may argue this point, but having taken both engineering courses and engineering technology courses, both are equally demanding. The main difference that I found was engineering technology courses used labs as class room activities much more the engineering courses.

One major advantage of engineering technology degrees is junior college classes will transfer better then engineering degrees. Example, Purdue is very strict with their freshman engineering curriculum, good luck getting a junior college calculus class to transfer in for credit. My wife's lab partner for physics was in the masters physics program, as a preq for the university, he had to take the first physics. These type of issues will not be a problem with most junior college credits in a engineering technology program.
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Posted: 10/8/2011 3:03:26 PM
Originally Posted by fp1201:
Computer Science was my first major: two years of COBOL. FORTRAN, and a couple others let me to the conclusion that as a programmer I SUCK!
At that time what I was really interested in was the internet and web pages. (keep in mind this was at a time when a 28.8 modem and 486 processer was considered fast!)


COBOL and FORTRAN were the first languages you learned in a CS curriculum? That's weird. Where was the C++ and Java?

Josh
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Posted: 10/8/2011 3:09:17 PM
Originally Posted By DaveBeal:
Originally Posted by fp1201:
Computer Science was my first major: two years of COBOL. FORTRAN, and a couple others let me to the conclusion that as a programmer I SUCK!
At that time what I was really interested in was the internet and web pages. (keep in mind this was at a time when a 28.8 modem and 486 processer was considered fast!)


COBOL and FORTRAN were the first languages you learned in a CS curriculum? That's weird. Where was the C++ and Java?



Neither had been invented yet.

Fortran 77 was my first high level language as well.

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