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Posted: 5/15/2013 5:34:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 5:48:03 PM EDT
That's Kent Wein ( Wein air Alaska family). He is great people. I flew with him when he first upgraded to Captain. The only time in my career, that I flew with a Captain younger than I was. His brother is a 737 Captain, and his dad is Very involved with the classic/warbird community.

He told me, he and his brother got to ferry FiFi once with their dad. The highlight of the trip? When ATC asked what kind of Boeing they were in, and he got to answer "we're a SUPERFORTRESS, sir".

He forgot to mention you can use the compass mirror on the glare shield , to check out anyone who is standing in the isle behind the cockpit, if the door is open.
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 5:57:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/15/2013 6:00:18 PM EDT by disorientedpilot]
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 7:07:33 PM EDT
Kind of reminds me of Christoph Waltz for some reason, or Kevin Spacy.
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 8:19:50 PM EDT
The S-80 grows on you. When I first got on it, I hated it. But 8000 hours later, I liked it.
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 8:30:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 4:18:21 AM EDT
Breakers!
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 12:44:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By disorientedpilot:
Nice. I would love to compare that to the dc9-10.


Eta, thanks nimslow.


I flew the DC9 at NWA as a Captain for eight years, never flew it as an F/O. Great airplane, the -10 would out climb the F100 and the -50 was as close to the Mad Dog as you could get. Reliable, rugged and radar vectors required. The bad thing, two VOR's and an ADF for navigation (think coffee grinder, in a jet). There were times you didn't know what state you were over...worst day ever was flying over eight hours and nine legs in one day, in a jet, in the same snow storm and never getting out of the state of Michigan.

And they can handle 38kts of crosswind.

Link Posted: 5/16/2013 1:03:00 PM EDT
What is the Mad Dog?
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 1:37:06 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 6:01:53 PM EDT
What's up with the magnetic compass anyway?
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 6:15:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
What is the Mad Dog?


MD-80 series...MD = Mad Dog
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 6:32:30 PM EDT
I've flown as a passenger in one, on two legs of a trip.

It was by far the smoothest flight I've ever been on. Awesome ride.


Link Posted: 5/16/2013 6:56:03 PM EDT
Been a passenger on the md80's quite a bit. One of my favorite planes, nice old school feel and reminds me of all the flights as a kid
Link Posted: 5/18/2013 6:37:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
What's up with the magnetic compass anyway?


The compass is one of those things that always makes me wonder "what were they thinking"?. My best guess, is that's the best place they could find, to put it, that keeps it away from all the electrical interference, mostly from the heated windscreens.

With all due respect to my friend Kent, he is not totally correct. There are two mirrors used to view the compass.

The Whiskey compass on the DC-9-80 series, is mounted near the ceiling, behind, and to the right, of the first officers head. Facing aft.


The compass is in the front of the cutout square in this picture.


Hard to get a good picture, but it's up in there.


Aft of the compass, facing forward, is a fixed mirror, that reflects the image of the compass forward. That's why the image is reversed, if you look back at the mirror.




Mounted on the top of the glare shield, are two, small, movable mirrors, that we can aim at the fixed mirror, behind the compass. These allow us to have a normal view of the compass rose.




Again..What were they thinking?
Link Posted: 5/19/2013 9:13:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
What's up with the magnetic compass anyway?


The compass is one of those things that always makes me wonder "what were they thinking"?. My best guess, is that's the best place they could find, to put it, that keeps it away from all the electrical interference, mostly from the heated windscreens.

With all due respect to my friend Kent, he is not totally correct. There are two mirrors used to view the compass.

The Whiskey compass on the DC-9-80 series, is mounted near the ceiling, behind, and to the right, of the first officers head. Facing aft.


The compass is in the front of the cutout square in this picture.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp2_zpsbe3873e6.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp2_zpsbe3873e6.jpg</a>

Hard to get a good picture, but it's up in there.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp1_zps26787b1a.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp1_zps26787b1a.jpg</a>

Aft of the compass, facing forward, is a fixed mirror, that reflects the image of the compass forward. That's why the image is reversed, if you look back at the mirror.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp6_zps1d7318ba.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp6_zps1d7318ba.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp5_zps3cc8c227.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp5_zps3cc8c227.jpg</a>

Mounted on the top of the glare shield, are two, small, movable mirrors, that we can aim at the fixed mirror, behind the compass. These allow us to have a normal view of the compass rose.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp3_zpsf064a831.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp3_zpsf064a831.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp4_zpsdbfff141.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp4_zpsdbfff141.jpg</a>

Again..What were they thinking?


Missing the fuzz dice!
Link Posted: 5/19/2013 9:53:56 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2013 2:40:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
I've flown as a passenger in one, on two legs of a trip.

It was by far the smoothest flight I've ever been on. Awesome ride.




Smooth ride is pretty much a function of weather conditions.
Link Posted: 5/19/2013 5:27:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
What's up with the magnetic compass anyway?


The compass is one of those things that always makes me wonder "what were they thinking"?. My best guess, is that's the best place they could find, to put it, that keeps it away from all the electrical interference, mostly from the heated windscreens.


The whiskey compass is my aircraft will spin about 45 degrees off when I flip on the landing light or spotlight. Makes sense to remote mount it......or at least the sensor on the newer ones.
Link Posted: 5/20/2013 11:02:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
I've flown as a passenger in one, on two legs of a trip.

It was by far the smoothest flight I've ever been on. Awesome ride.




Smooth ride is pretty much a function of weather conditions.


And wing loading.
Link Posted: 5/20/2013 3:23:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/20/2013 3:26:15 PM EDT by mouthpiece]
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
What's up with the magnetic compass anyway?


The compass is one of those things that always makes me wonder "what were they thinking"?. My best guess, is that's the best place they could find, to put it, that keeps it away from all the electrical interference, mostly from the heated windscreens.

With all due respect to my friend Kent, he is not totally correct. There are two mirrors used to view the compass.

The Whiskey compass on the DC-9-80 series, is mounted near the ceiling, behind, and to the right, of the first officers head. Facing aft.


The compass is in the front of the cutout square in this picture.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp2_zpsbe3873e6.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp2_zpsbe3873e6.jpg</a>

Hard to get a good picture, but it's up in there.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp1_zps26787b1a.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp1_zps26787b1a.jpg</a>

Aft of the compass, facing forward, is a fixed mirror, that reflects the image of the compass forward. That's why the image is reversed, if you look back at the mirror.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp6_zps1d7318ba.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp6_zps1d7318ba.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp5_zps3cc8c227.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp5_zps3cc8c227.jpg</a>

Mounted on the top of the glare shield, are two, small, movable mirrors, that we can aim at the fixed mirror, behind the compass. These allow us to have a normal view of the compass rose.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp3_zpsf064a831.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp3_zpsf064a831.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp4_zpsdbfff141.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp4_zpsdbfff141.jpg</a>

Again..What were they thinking?


Almost looks like TUL but not quite. AA for sure.
Edit; maybe not. I thought we had replaced all the silver covered insulation.
Link Posted: 5/21/2013 2:12:07 PM EDT
I forgot to add: do not pull the wrong handle in the back of the airplane for the air stairs.

It is the only aircraft that I know that has ice on the wings after refueling during the summer.
Link Posted: 5/21/2013 2:39:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By AR18:
I forgot to add: do not pull the wrong handle in the back of the airplane for the air stairs.

It is the only aircraft that I know that has ice on the wings after refueling during the summer.


What happens if you pull the wrong handle?
Link Posted: 5/21/2013 3:34:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/21/2013 3:39:31 PM EDT by mouthpiece]
Originally Posted By M82Assault:
Originally Posted By AR18:
I forgot to add: do not pull the wrong handle in the back of the airplane for the air stairs.

It is the only aircraft that I know that has ice on the wings after refueling during the summer.


What happens if you pull the wrong handle?


Eject the tail cone.

Edit; oh yeah and escape slide for the cabin out the tail!!
Link Posted: 5/21/2013 3:35:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
That's Kent Wein ( Wein air Alaska family). He is great people. I flew with him when he first upgraded to Captain. The only time in my career, that I flew with a Captain younger than I was. His brother is a 737 Captain, and his dad is Very involved with the classic/warbird community.

He told me, he and his brother got to ferry FiFi once with their dad. The highlight of the trip? When ATC asked what kind of Boeing they were in, and he got to answer "we're a SUPERFORTRESS, sir".

He forgot to mention you can use the compass mirror on the glare shield , to check out anyone who is standing in the isle behind the cockpit, if the door is open.



Kent Wein also did the U2-Vertigo "Three day trip from a pilot's point of view" several years ago:


Pretty accurate, too.. :)








Link Posted: 5/21/2013 3:39:22 PM EDT


Oh and to the original video.. that is an incredible throttle quadrant. A lot of shit going on there!




Link Posted: 5/21/2013 4:39:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Patriot328:
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
That's Kent Wein ( Wein air Alaska family). He is great people. I flew with him when he first upgraded to Captain. The only time in my career, that I flew with a Captain younger than I was. His brother is a 737 Captain, and his dad is Very involved with the classic/warbird community.

He told me, he and his brother got to ferry FiFi once with their dad. The highlight of the trip? When ATC asked what kind of Boeing they were in, and he got to answer "we're a SUPERFORTRESS, sir".

He forgot to mention you can use the compass mirror on the glare shield , to check out anyone who is standing in the isle behind the cockpit, if the door is open.



Kent Wein also did the U2-Vertigo "Three day trip from a pilot's point of view" several years ago:


Pretty accurate, too.. :)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYEllK8L5YM







Great vid
Link Posted: 5/21/2013 6:29:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Patriot328:


Oh and to the original video.. that is an incredible throttle quadrant. A lot of shit going on there!






Here is the inside..Maintenance had it torn apart, to chase down a flap position switch problem....





Link Posted: 5/21/2013 6:47:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
Originally Posted By Patriot328:


Oh and to the original video.. that is an incredible throttle quadrant. A lot of shit going on there!






Here is the inside..Maintenance had it torn apart, to chase down a flap position switch problem....

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/IMG_20130202_101452_zpsf2887f2b.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/IMG_20130202_101452_zpsf2887f2b.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/IMG_20130202_101446_zpscdbff2be.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/IMG_20130202_101446_zpscdbff2be.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/IMG_20130202_101440_zps5d3f7284.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/IMG_20130202_101440_zps5d3f7284.jpg</a>



Rube Goldberg would be proud!





Link Posted: 5/23/2013 7:43:34 PM EDT
He didn't mention its stabilator. Can a Mad Dog driver explain to me again why it is that when I'm taxiing behind one its stab is always split and flapping in the wind?
I wanna say its something like aerodynamic forces hold it in position and the yoke is just controlling the elevator which... hell, I can't remember. What is it again?
Link Posted: 5/23/2013 8:13:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Vne:
He didn't mention its stabilator. Can a Mad Dog driver explain to me again why it is that when I'm taxiing behind one its stab is always split and flapping in the wind?
I wanna say its something like aerodynamic forces hold it in position and the yoke is just controlling the elevator which... hell, I can't remember. What is it again?


They are free, as in control tabs and not not connected to anything. The whole DC 9 series uses servo tabs to move the flight controls. No hydraulics...it's called direct cable (DC) for a reason.
Link Posted: 5/23/2013 9:33:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By F224:
Originally Posted By Vne:
He didn't mention its stabilator. Can a Mad Dog driver explain to me again why it is that when I'm taxiing behind one its stab is always split and flapping in the wind?
I wanna say its something like aerodynamic forces hold it in position and the yoke is just controlling the elevator which... hell, I can't remember. What is it again?


They are free, as in control tabs and not not connected to anything. The whole DC 9 series uses servo tabs to move the flight controls. No hydraulics...it's called direct cable (DC) for a reason.


Oh yeah. Can you think of any other aircraft that have this type of setup? The DC-9 through MD series are the only aircraft I've noticed it on.
Link Posted: 5/24/2013 4:18:21 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Vne:
Originally Posted By F224:
Originally Posted By Vne:
He didn't mention its stabilator. Can a Mad Dog driver explain to me again why it is that when I'm taxiing behind one its stab is always split and flapping in the wind?
I wanna say its something like aerodynamic forces hold it in position and the yoke is just controlling the elevator which... hell, I can't remember. What is it again?


They are free, as in control tabs and not not connected to anything. The whole DC 9 series uses servo tabs to move the flight controls. No hydraulics...it's called direct cable (DC) for a reason.


Oh yeah. Can you think of any other aircraft that have this type of setup? The DC-9 through MD series are the only aircraft I've noticed it on.


707 / KC-135.
Link Posted: 5/24/2013 5:40:18 AM EDT
Loved that video. Thanks for sharing it.
Link Posted: 5/24/2013 5:59:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
What's up with the magnetic compass anyway?


The compass is one of those things that always makes me wonder "what were they thinking"?. My best guess, is that's the best place they could find, to put it, that keeps it away from all the electrical interference, mostly from the heated windscreens.

With all due respect to my friend Kent, he is not totally correct. There are two mirrors used to view the compass.

The Whiskey compass on the DC-9-80 series, is mounted near the ceiling, behind, and to the right, of the first officers head. Facing aft.


The compass is in the front of the cutout square in this picture.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp2_zpsbe3873e6.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp2_zpsbe3873e6.jpg</a>

Hard to get a good picture, but it's up in there.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp1_zps26787b1a.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp1_zps26787b1a.jpg</a>

Aft of the compass, facing forward, is a fixed mirror, that reflects the image of the compass forward. That's why the image is reversed, if you look back at the mirror.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp6_zps1d7318ba.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp6_zps1d7318ba.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp5_zps3cc8c227.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp5_zps3cc8c227.jpg</a>

Mounted on the top of the glare shield, are two, small, movable mirrors, that we can aim at the fixed mirror, behind the compass. These allow us to have a normal view of the compass rose.
<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp3_zpsf064a831.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp3_zpsf064a831.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/cmp4_zpsdbfff141.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/cmp4_zpsdbfff141.jpg</a>

Again..What were they thinking?



I'll take an educated guess as to why it's where it is.

Maybe because that's the best place in the cockpit to put it and still have it give a true heading without any magnetic interference from something close enough to it if it was mounted in a reasonable place.

But I don't know for sure.
Link Posted: 5/25/2013 3:47:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:

Here is the inside..Maintenance had it torn apart, to chase down a flap position switch problem....


Man, I've gotten spoiled working on fly-by-(electrical-)wire aircraft...
Link Posted: 5/25/2013 9:05:36 PM EDT
I wonder if that pilot knows there is a plumb bob on a string, in the nose wheel well.
Link Posted: 5/26/2013 10:49:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GAU5-A-A:
I wonder if that pilot knows there is a plumb bob on a string, in the nose wheel well.


Probably not.

Most flight crews that I have encounter like to stay away from something greasy.

Then there a few flight crew want to see how shit works.
Link Posted: 5/26/2013 11:46:23 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/26/2013 11:51:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/26/2013 11:54:55 AM EDT by Patriot328]
Originally Posted By disorientedpilot:
Originally Posted By GAU5-A-A:
I wonder if that pilot knows there is a plumb bob on a string, in the nose wheel well.


What does this do?


Hangs down.



It's probably a reference to whether the plane is level or not. There is something similar, but less crude, in some Boeings:




Link Posted: 5/26/2013 7:16:24 PM EDT
The plumb-bob is used for inop guage refueling. You use the plumb bob (or bubble level on some aircraft) to see what the pitch and roll is. Then you pull the sticks and get readings. Then using this information you go to the handy-dandy reference books to see how much fuel is on board. Of course, transferring fuel is much preferred method, but not always possible.

Speaking of, how about drip-sticks vs. magna-sticks! Whoo hoo! Jet A squirter...

Been a while since I did any of that... hope i remembered correctly.

Gus
Link Posted: 5/27/2013 6:25:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GAU5-A-A:
I wonder if that pilot knows there is a plumb bob on a string, in the nose wheel well.


I'd say most of us knew that.

It wasn't that uncommon to have an inop fuel gauge. We knew the plane had to be level to accurately check the fuel level using "the stick". And leveling the plane could be a very time consuming PITA for maintenance. That's why metering the fuel was the preferred method.
Link Posted: 5/29/2013 9:40:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kekoa:
Originally Posted By GAU5-A-A:
I wonder if that pilot knows there is a plumb bob on a string, in the nose wheel well.


I'd say most of us knew that.

It wasn't that uncommon to have an inop fuel gauge. We knew the plane had to be level to accurately check the fuel level using "the stick". And leveling the plane could be a very time consuming PITA for maintenance. That's why metering the fuel was the preferred method.



It doesn't have to be level, we just need the actual attitude of the aircraft for the fuel level reference. The fuel chart book is easily an inch and a half thick.
Link Posted: 5/29/2013 9:41:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
Originally Posted By Patriot328:


Oh and to the original video.. that is an incredible throttle quadrant. A lot of shit going on there!






Here is the inside..Maintenance had it torn apart, to chase down a flap position switch problem....

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/IMG_20130202_101452_zpsf2887f2b.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/IMG_20130202_101452_zpsf2887f2b.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/IMG_20130202_101446_zpscdbff2be.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/IMG_20130202_101446_zpscdbff2be.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s21.photobucket.com/user/nimslow/media/IMG_20130202_101440_zps5d3f7284.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/nimslow/IMG_20130202_101440_zps5d3f7284.jpg</a>


The throttle clutch pack in there is an easy three day job working 24/day to replace, as long a nothing else is found down there.
Link Posted: 5/29/2013 9:43:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By F224:
Originally Posted By Vne:
He didn't mention its stabilator. Can a Mad Dog driver explain to me again why it is that when I'm taxiing behind one its stab is always split and flapping in the wind?
I wanna say its something like aerodynamic forces hold it in position and the yoke is just controlling the elevator which... hell, I can't remember. What is it again?


They are free, as in control tabs and not not connected to anything. The whole DC 9 series uses servo tabs to move the flight controls. No hydraulics...it's called direct cable (DC) for a reason.


Only to the MD-88. MD-90 and B-717 moved to hydraulically powered elevators.
Link Posted: 6/4/2013 4:22:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DeltaAir423:

Only to the MD-88. MD-90 and B-717 moved to hydraulically powered elevators.


They're powered full-time? I thought they only got hydraulic assist when going to full nose-down (along with the pylon flaps on the -90) for stall recovery...
Link Posted: 6/4/2013 4:53:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By icebrain:
Originally Posted By DeltaAir423:

Only to the MD-88. MD-90 and B-717 moved to hydraulically powered elevators.


They're powered full-time? I thought they only got hydraulic assist when going to full nose-down (along with the pylon flaps on the -90) for stall recovery...


Yep one of the changes. You still can fly with just the tabs, but there's PCA's on each elevator. If you look about 4 feet outboard of the vertical, you'll see a bulge on the horizontal stab and elevator. That's where the PCA lives.
Link Posted: 6/4/2013 5:06:57 PM EDT
How come on some aircraft, you see the elevators either drooping or more often deflected full up (nose-down) when at the gate?
Link Posted: 6/4/2013 5:08:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GustusJ:
The plumb-bob is used for inop guage refueling. You use the plumb bob (or bubble level on some aircraft) to see what the pitch and roll is. Then you pull the sticks and get readings. Then using this information you go to the handy-dandy reference books to see how much fuel is on board. Of course, transferring fuel is much preferred method, but not always possible.

Speaking of, how about drip-sticks vs. magna-sticks! Whoo hoo! Jet A squirter...

Been a while since I did any of that... hope i remembered correctly.

Gus


I forgot that was even there.... guess I've flown too many airplanes with working fuel gauges. The chart is all coming back to me now.
Link Posted: 6/4/2013 5:11:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
How come on some aircraft, you see the elevators either drooping or more often deflected full up (nose-down) when at the gate?


Heavy control surfaces and no hydraulic pressure leads to drooping.... Wind could deflect them up. Sometimes they'll split and each side go their own ways...
Link Posted: 6/4/2013 5:12:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CaptainPatSmith:
Originally Posted By Sig_Prude:
How come on some aircraft, you see the elevators either drooping or more often deflected full up (nose-down) when at the gate?


Heavy control surfaces and no hydraulic pressure leads to drooping.... Wind could deflect them up. Sometimes they'll split and each side go their own ways...


So I guess those aircraft are 100% reliant on hydraulics?
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