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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 12/26/2012 1:47:00 PM EDT
Ford Ranger.

I have a bunch of 50lb sand and gravel bags.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:48:31 PM EDT
For a Ranger, id say 500lbs. that would even out the back from the front (figure motor weighs around that)
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:11:02 PM EDT
For what? If it is just to give yourself a little extra traction I would go with 100 to 150 lbs. Too much weight will just make it harder to stop.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:16:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By inzane123:
For what? If it is just to give yourself a little extra traction I would go with 100 to 150 lbs. Too much weight will just make it harder to stop.


Traction. Prevent fish tailing.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:22:26 PM EDT
2wd S10 here. In winter, I throw one 80lb bag of salt in the bed for traction. That's good most of the time. If we're getting a good snow, I'll throw in a second bag. Never have done more than two bags. YMMV.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:55:02 PM EDT
I have a 2wd ranger. I have 3 70 pound tubes of sand in the back. Could use 1 more. My tires are on the ragged edge of crap though,gonna replace them after new years.210 pound has been enough in the past here, but crappy tires do nothing.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:57:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By die-tryin:
For a Ranger, id say 500lbs. that would even out the back from the front (figure motor weighs around that)


Do you drive in a lot of snow and ice? 500lbs would just make it impossible to stop. You'd end up way out in the rhubarb if you tried that here. Last wednesday we got 11" of snow, how much did you get?
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 3:02:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By soldier65:
Originally Posted By die-tryin:
For a Ranger, id say 500lbs. that would even out the back from the front (figure motor weighs around that)


Do you drive in a lot of snow and ice? 500lbs would just make it impossible to stop. You'd end up way out in the rhubarb if you tried that here. Last wednesday we got 11" of snow, how much did you get?


I grew up in WV (20years living there) So, yea ive been in snow and ice before. It was not uncommon to stick 400-500lbs in the back of the trucks, never had any issues going or stopping but I dont drive like a dolt in bad weather either. Never put er in the ditch and had no problems going up the steep hill we lived on.

This was taken Sat.



Taken couple years ago.



Link Posted: 12/26/2012 3:03:54 PM EDT
Its a 2wd with a 4x4 option.

If that matters.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 3:08:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By VooDoo3dfx:
Its a 2wd with a 4x4 option.

If that matters.


Not really, still need weight in the back for the traction.

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 3:11:44 PM EDT
I think the key here is good tires. We had a bit of a frost last year and the neighbor couldn't back his truck up his slightly sloping driveway due to bald tires. Goodyear Duratracs of BFGoodrich AT KO with 200# of sand will go a long ways.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 3:16:15 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 3:18:17 PM EDT
I put 300 pounds (5 x 60 pound sand tubes) in my Silverado 4x4. Really helps the rear dig in the snow. For a Ranger, I would say 300 pounds would be plenty. Maybe try 200 and see how it does. Also, as mentioned, good tires will go a long way.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 4:20:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Striker:
I don't put any weight in the back of mine..the thought of a 100 lb sand bag coming through the back window if I hit something front on doesn't appeal to me.
If I need extra traction I throw it in 4x4 then kick it back into 2 wd.


Um you could secure the ballast......

Brian
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 4:23:57 PM EDT

modern vehicles are engineered to be remarkably strong and you should have no worries whatsoever even when grossly exceeding the manufacturer's stated GVWR.

ar-jedi











Link Posted: 12/26/2012 4:35:53 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 10:31:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/26/2012 10:33:03 PM EDT by Bogie]
I drive a 84 Dodge Crew Cab with a fair bit of lift and 37" Interco Swampers in NY winters I use a SureTrax bladder without worry

www.shurtrax.com
Easily tame the slipping, sliding traction problems of winter driving.

Add much needed traction weight, up to 400 pounds, evenly balanced, right over the rear axle in your full size pickup, 300 pounds to your compact/midsize pickup or 100 pounds to a performance auto/SUV/CUV.

ShurTrax traction control system is constructed of tough, woven nylon mesh with heavy vinyl impregnation, configured as a bladder. ShurTrax lies flat in your pickup truck bed or auto trunk as you fill to just 3 inches depth with a garden hose. Baffles prevent sloshing and ShurTrax is designed to freeze, protected to minus 40 degrees. Stop spinning your wheels this winter with a ShurTrax traction control system
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 11:25:47 PM EDT
A whole bunch. So that the rear suspension sags, and your headlights are now pointed in everyone's eyes.
Link Posted: 12/27/2012 1:16:51 PM EDT

They forgot to tie a little red flag to the back of the load. That's why they got pulled over.

Link Posted: 12/27/2012 1:50:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Bogie:
I drive a 84 Dodge Crew Cab with a fair bit of lift and 37" Interco Swampers in NY winters I use a SureTrax bladder without worry

www.shurtrax.com
Easily tame the slipping, sliding traction problems of winter driving.

Add much needed traction weight, up to 400 pounds, evenly balanced, right over the rear axle in your full size pickup, 300 pounds to your compact/midsize pickup or 100 pounds to a performance auto/SUV/CUV.

ShurTrax traction control system is constructed of tough, woven nylon mesh with heavy vinyl impregnation, configured as a bladder. ShurTrax lies flat in your pickup truck bed or auto trunk as you fill to just 3 inches depth with a garden hose. Baffles prevent sloshing and ShurTrax is designed to freeze, protected to minus 40 degrees. Stop spinning your wheels this winter with a ShurTrax traction control system


I imagine this works pretty well. My wife's cousin was a concrete contractor in central Michigan and he used to line his truck bed with visqueen and pour about 3" of concrete in the floor of the bed before winter hit. It proably added 500# or so and it was easy to bust up in the spring time.
Link Posted: 12/27/2012 2:05:56 PM EDT
dont know but the guy i saw yesterday with his f150 on the bumpstops may have overdone it.
Link Posted: 12/28/2012 4:40:20 AM EDT
I didn't put any weight in the back of my 2WD S10 last winter and had no problem. That said, it's not a bad idea to carry a few bags of sand around in case you do get stuck, not because of any added benefits of the sand being in the box. If it has a 4x4 option, I wouldn't even worry about it.
Link Posted: 12/29/2012 8:20:06 AM EDT
I lived in AK for 20yrs I never bothered with putting ballast in the bed, but I did on occassion haul heavy stuff, and yes traction was notably better, more evident in the handling than straight-line acceleration, but not enough for me personally to go buy or fill sand bags or salt bags, weight made far less difference in my Ranger than it did in my SD. 500lbs will not really make it any more difficult to stop, I never once in dozens of trips had an issue with my Ranger stopping from well over posted speeds on down with a snowmobile (6-700lbs wet) in the back. I rarely have tires that aren't worn out. If you are commited to the idea 500lbs is most likely excessive and in a ranger will sag the back end and eat mileage a little, something more like 150-200 right over or slightly ahead of the axle would probably be more appropriate. Ideally gravel or rock salt, I find them to be far more useful for getting back onto the road or started moving if you chose a bad place to park than sand alone.
Link Posted: 12/30/2012 2:50:17 AM EDT
I drove a '01 Ranger 4x4 in North Dakota last winter. After finding out (in a very terrifying manner but thankfully without damage) that it has the traction of an egg on a Made-For-TV frying pan coated in PAM on anything but a dry surface, I sourced some semi-truck brake drums. 5 rear drums and 2 steer drums to the tune of 700lbs later, the vehicle was able to self-locomote on an icy surface. Braking was not adversely affected, nor mileage in a significant manner as observed by several 1200mi trips.


Put at least 500lbs FORWARD of the wheel wells in the bed. Secure any weight taller than 10" with a strap.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/30/2012 6:08:43 AM EDT
I use 2-250 pounds usually but thats more to balance out the weight of the snow plow then anything. My ranger (2wd) I use 2 70 pound bags next to the wheel wells. Works fine just in case.
Link Posted: 12/30/2012 11:40:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/30/2012 12:29:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Striker:
My drive to work at 5:30 this morning. 2 wheel drive,limited slip rear end, traction control turned off, no weight in the box and never spun a tire..


http://www.ar15.com/media/viewFile.html?i=45623


Might want to get some WINDSHIELD WIPERS!!

Link Posted: 12/30/2012 1:06:41 PM EDT
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