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6/25/2017 7:35:25 PM
6/21/2017 8:25:40 PM
Posted: 10/31/2011 5:49:22 AM EDT
I'm putting the finishing touches on my rifle, and have a question on offset sight placement vs accuracy. I have a scope mounted and want to add offset irons. In regards to repeatable accuracy, is it better to mount the front offset sight on the gas block, or mount it on an extended forearm that covers the gas block? I can do either, and like the way the extended forearm looks, but have heard that mounting the sight on the float tube is not the best way to go. Advice is much appreciated!! Thanks!!
Link Posted: 10/31/2011 7:30:52 AM EDT
For short range use it won't hurt to have them on the float tube. If this was your primary sighting system it wouldn't be ideal because the tube can flex.
Link Posted: 11/1/2011 8:34:28 PM EDT
So as far as offset sights go, who's using what? I was looking at the Dueck sights, but not sure about the rear sight mounted backwards (I'm a lefty). I want to stay with irons on this rifle, so can anyone make some suggestions about what has worked for them? Any info is appreciated - Thanks
Link Posted: 11/2/2011 2:06:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/2/2011 2:07:51 AM EDT by Glockfan]
I use this as my patrol rifle. (scopes fog when you go inside after being outside in the cold) Its just Magpul gen two sights ona daniel deffese off set mounts. Works well for me.
Pat




I used to have troys on it but moved them to another rifle and used magpuls to save money.
Pat
Link Posted: 11/3/2011 2:37:52 PM EDT
For three gun, I've found that it is not necessary to have the rear sight behind your primary optic. After all these sights are only for close targets. Here is a pic of me on my friends rifle at a match a few years ago. I was going to pick up a set of the Knight's sights but they never came to my local shop so I might go with the Surefires of maybe order the Knight's from another vendor. You would be surprised how decent of a sight picture you get even with the rear sight so forward. Either way, once you pick up a pair you can try both ways. -Ben

Link Posted: 11/3/2011 3:21:21 PM EDT
It can work if its forward but its faster if the rear sight is close to your eye. That way all you have to do is put the front sight on the target. I find an apature sight up that far to be very slow to use.
Pat
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 8:07:00 AM EDT
That's a good point , Pat. Plus having the longer sight radius would be a plus. More accurate to mount the front sight on the float tube or the gas block? I know that 3G rifles may tend to get banged around a lot. How much is a float tube (like a VTAC) liable to flex or move around?
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 3:22:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/4/2011 3:23:10 PM EDT by Glockfan]
The gas block is more stable but I use low profile gas blocks and long forends because I prefer to be able to rest the forearm vs the barrel on a barricade. Then again I don't shoot irons much. Unless your putting a lot of pressure on the forend however I don't see it causing huge points of impact changes at the ranges your going to be using these side sights.
Pat
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 7:04:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/4/2011 7:05:33 PM EDT by jtischauser]
Link Posted: 11/11/2011 3:55:11 PM EDT
What yardage do you zero the iron sights at? What would be optimal?
Link Posted: 11/11/2011 7:38:14 PM EDT
I zeroed mine at 50 yards like I would standard Irons. That way I just hold on target till 200 yards. Not that I would need to use these that far out. Some people sight them at 25 yards.
Pat
Link Posted: 11/12/2011 12:26:19 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/12/2011 12:48:04 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/12/2011 11:58:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/12/2011 12:09:08 PM EDT by Glockfan]
Originally Posted By jtischauser:
Originally Posted By Glockfan:
I zeroed mine at 50 yards like I would standard Irons. That way I just hold on target till 200 yards. Not that I would need to use these that far out. Some people sight them at 25 yards.
Pat


Did u shoot them at 200? Its gonna have to be a pretty big target to be on target at both 50 and 200. Remember that your rifle is now tilted almost 45 degrees so your barrel is now pointing left and not as high as compared to when its verticle.

Since the bore axis is on a different plane than the offset irons the bullet will not cross the same line of sight as the irons twice like it will when using your optic in the vertical position.


I shot my department rifle qual with starts at 100 yards and the shots hit where I put them. When you rotate the rifle over your off set sights are very close to being directly over the bore. They are still off slightly but not a huge amount. The off set is more noticable at extreme close range such as head shots at 7 yards. That is accounting for the normal off set at that range. When I sight in the off set sights I tilt the rifle in the bag until the sights are over the bore like a normal set of sights would be. Thats Also how I shoot them.
Pat
Link Posted: 11/12/2011 12:10:30 PM EDT
Pat,

"It can work if its forward but its faster if the rear sight is close to your eye. That way all you have to do is put the front sight on the target. I find an apature sight up that far to be very slow to use."

Which is odd, b/c all of the early 20th century battle rifles, save the Enfield, started out w/ mid mounted sights, the theory being a rear-mounted aperture sight would be too slow, albeit has more inherent accuracy due to the longer sight radius.

Gig 'em,

backbencher
Link Posted: 11/12/2011 4:25:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By backbencher:
Pat,

"It can work if its forward but its faster if the rear sight is close to your eye. That way all you have to do is put the front sight on the target. I find an apature sight up that far to be very slow to use."

Which is odd, b/c all of the early 20th century battle rifles, save the Enfield, started out w/ mid mounted sights, the theory being a rear-mounted aperture sight would be too slow, albeit has more inherent accuracy due to the longer sight radius.

Gig 'em,

backbencher


I believe that was because in the early 20th century most of the rear apature sights were very small for maximum precision at long range and such as set up is not fast. Open up the apature a bit and you get a really fast and dirty sight for close in. (AKA Ghost ring)
Pat
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