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1/14/2017 8:11:35 PM
Posted: 11/8/2013 1:56:27 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 2:14:24 PM EST
What kind of climate could you be in where this makes a difference?

He is creating draft for a tea light. Not many BTUs in that unit.
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 2:22:27 PM EST
I bet that would work n Hawaii or Porto Rico, wouldn't do shit where it is cool or cold.
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 2:43:59 PM EST
sounds similar to the wood burning can/stoves.
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 2:46:48 PM EST
thermodynamics are not his strong suit, nor the editor
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 3:13:17 PM EST
Create thousands of btu's from dozens! The anger from having a lit tea light shoved up your ass would create more heat than a tea light by itself.
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 3:58:30 PM EST
Next up, the miracle 100 MPG carburetor the oil companies don't want you to know about!
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 4:03:57 PM EST
Might heat up a very small room to keep it from freezing, but 4 candles would do that anyway (and burn up O2).

I've also seen something similar in a survival situation that involved placing a can with a candle in it under a wooden slat chair lined with foil. Basically it just heated your ass and kept you from freezing.
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 4:08:43 PM EST
I don't know how well it works as I haven't tried it. But I also haven't seen any guys that build the mini houses using these either and they are all kinds of creative when it comes to heating!

I'm guessing that dutch ovening yourself in bed would give you more heat than this.

-Emt1581
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 5:57:18 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 7:06:19 PM EST
Thermodynamics?
We don't need no stinking Thermodynamics.
I'll heat my home with Unicorn farts.
Link Posted: 11/8/2013 7:44:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:


thermodynamics are not his strong suit, nor the editor
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:


thermodynamics are not his strong suit, nor the editor

Link Posted: 11/8/2013 9:25:13 PM EST
use to hunt with a guy that slept in a very well insulated 10 x 12 building he built. He would burn 1 candle for heat and it would run you out. Now when it was 25-20 degrees it wouldn't keep it a nice and toasty 78 or whatever but it was reasonably comfortable. Further north it might keep you from freezing in an emergency
Link Posted: 11/9/2013 4:10:44 AM EST
What is the btu output of a normal candle?
Link Posted: 11/9/2013 4:24:18 AM EST
Yeah. No. Not at all. This generates precisely the same heat as a single burning tea candle. Not one iota more.

There are some laws of physics that speak to this.
Link Posted: 11/9/2013 5:24:58 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By batmanacw:
Create thousands of btu's from dozens! The anger from having a lit tea light shoved up your ass would create more heat than a tea light by itself.
View Quote



Not sure you can say the same about a piece of burning firewood.
Link Posted: 11/9/2013 5:33:41 AM EST
Throw a poncho over that tealight and you'll be nice and warm.
Link Posted: 11/9/2013 6:37:13 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KingRat:
Throw a poncho over that tealight and you'll be nice and warm.
View Quote


yep I've done similar to that in the service, sitting with my M60 in the day time in a cold rain/snow mix. poncho over me, sterno can between my feet, heating a canteen cup of ramen. The platoon sergeat when he saw the steam flowing off me thought he was going to send me out to sick call with a hellacious fever. I should have let him!

Anyways yep that little bit of flame and a poncho (and of course the soup), and I was in much better shape in a short bit. Hot wets are good.

Similarly to that in my old Marine Corps repetoire; the arctic tents, we jammed packed extra guys in the tent and had one or two noco candle lanterns. In short order the sub zero temps were abated a bit to where you could take off a layer. (I concede the extra bodies processing MRE bean components may have been a factor as well)
Link Posted: 11/9/2013 7:48:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/9/2013 7:49:42 AM EST by DocGP]
Yep, silly me has been wasting all that money on a propane fire place!! Have to tell the wife that is done now!!

Doc

Edit to add; If I throw in a few flower pots to the mix I can probably heat the Astrodome . Ooops, no, they have voted to tear it down now. Never mind.
Link Posted: 11/9/2013 6:15:58 PM EST
Did I mention he's a boat owner....






Link Posted: 11/9/2013 6:59:04 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 5:20:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/10/2013 5:22:58 AM EST by MrHunterAZ]
I found tealights at Ikea for $3.99 per 100. According to the website the whole package weighs 3lbs so figure 0.48 ounces per light (if that is all wax weight, which it is not). According to this website each pound of parafin wax has 18,621 BTUs.

So each tealight theoretically can give off a max of 559 BTUs for $0.04.

This website says that it takes 0.018 Btus to raise the temp of 1 cubic feet of air 1 degree Farenheiht at 70F, sea level, zero humidity.

So 1 tealight will raise the temp of 31,000 cubic feet of air 1 degree at 70F, sea level, zero humidity.

Not a HUGE amount of heating power BUT a single tealight just might make the difference between someone's stock of canned goods being ruined by freezing and not freezing.

I do not know about the whole flower pot thing, I can somewhat see the whole heat diffuser thing but I do not know enough about that stuff to make a judgement.

I would think an oil lamp would be a cheaper source of heating energy but I like the idea of candles supplimenting one's heating needs.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 5:30:42 AM EST
why would freezing affect canned goods? think how they are shipped cross country in unheated trailers and rail cars.

in any case, you can heat some air up with your candle but it takes a lot more BTUs to heat up the solid things in your house like the walls and your canned goods, and to deal with the heat that is escaping through your walls.

You probably generate more BTUs than these burning candles do.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:08:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/10/2013 6:10:13 AM EST by MrHunterAZ]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ilbob:
why would freezing affect canned goods? think how they are shipped cross country in unheated trailers and rail cars.

in any case, you can heat some air up with your candle but it takes a lot more BTUs to heat up the solid things in your house like the walls and your canned goods, and to deal with the heat that is escaping through your walls.

You probably generate more BTUs than these burning candles do.
View Quote


Canned goods do not like temperature swings nor being frozen. Mason jars particulrarily do not do well because they tend to break and pop the seals and tin cans do not like to be frozen because the seals can break and condensation from freezing and thawing causes rust pits.

I do not think canned goods are routinely or intentionally frozen.

"Damage claims for canned goods cost carriers millions of dollars annually. There are two major causes of damage to canned foods during duistribution-mechanical and temperature...A smaller percentage of claims results from improper temperature conditions, which cause rusting of the cans or freezing of the contents.

Freezing is not likely to damage the canned product itself. However, freezing a canned product may endanger the container integrity or break a glass container. "

Protecting Perishable Foods During Transport by Truck


It is true that it takes a lot of energy to thaw frozen cans but it does not take much energy to prevent them from freezing in the first place. You do not have to worry about freezing as long as you maintain your room above 32F.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:10:54 AM EST
I'm currently involved in an online argument with someone who insists that this thing works by channeling radiant heat and using it more efficiently, similar to the way a terracotta or cast iron woodstove does.

In doing some research to defend my own claims, I came across a snazzy quote from the creator of the device:

“Candle Holder does not “make” additional heat — what it does is short stop the loss of heat to the ceiling and creates a radiant heater at
table level. And it is almost always guys who over analyze this simple
device.” -Doyle Doss, inventor

Discuss.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:18:28 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cymro:
I'm currently involved in an online argument with someone who insists that this thing works by channeling radiant heat and using it more efficiently, similar to the way a terracotta or cast iron woodstove does.

In doing some research to defend my own claims, I came across a snazzy quote from the creator of the device:

“Candle Holder does not “make” additional heat — what it does is short stop the loss of heat to the ceiling and creates a radiant heater at
table level. And it is almost always guys who over analyze this simple
device.” -Doyle Doss, inventor

Discuss.
View Quote


I would think that there would be some loss of energy in heating the clay pots up. I would imagine any benefit of diffussing the heat would be negated by the loss of having to transfer the energy into the pot in the first place?
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:22:48 AM EST
What I suspect is that burning four candles in the morning and four in the afternoon is raising the ambient temperature by about 15 degrees all day long, extrapolating from the math posted above and assuming we're heating an average British apartment (just under 1000sqf. I looked it up).

Given that room temperature in the UK is about 65F on average, I think we can all see where the mistakes come in.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:27:43 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cymro:
I'm currently involved in an online argument with someone who insists that this thing works by channeling radiant heat and using it more efficiently, similar to the way a terracotta or cast iron woodstove does.

In doing some research to defend my own claims, I came across a snazzy quote from the creator of the device:

"Candle Holder does not "make” additional heat — what it does is short stop the loss of heat to the ceiling and creates a radiant heater at
table level. And it is almost always guys who over analyze this simple
device.” -Doyle Doss, inventor

Discuss.
View Quote
Looking at the design, that does seem to be the point of the two flower pots. Make the air move around enough the pots get hot too, which then radiate infra-red radiant heat into the room.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:29:38 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cymro:
What I suspect is that burning four candles in the morning and four in the afternoon is raising the ambient temperature by about 15 degrees all day long, extrapolating from the math posted above and assuming we're heating an average British apartment (just under 1000sqf. I looked it up).

Given that room temperature in the UK is about 65F on average, I think we can all see where the mistakes come in.
View Quote


Keep in mind that the inventor in the video was in a room that was about 200-300 sqft. My master bathroom is larger than his "apartment." I don't remeber anyone making claims on a 1,000 sqft apt.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:29:52 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrHunterAZ:


I would think that there would be some loss of energy in heating the clay pots up. I would imagine any benefit of diffussing the heat would be negated by the loss of having to transfer the energy into the pot in the first place?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrHunterAZ:
Originally Posted By Cymro:
I'm currently involved in an online argument with someone who insists that this thing works by channeling radiant heat and using it more efficiently, similar to the way a terracotta or cast iron woodstove does.

In doing some research to defend my own claims, I came across a snazzy quote from the creator of the device:

"Candle Holder does not "make” additional heat — what it does is short stop the loss of heat to the ceiling and creates a radiant heater at
table level. And it is almost always guys who over analyze this simple
device.” -Doyle Doss, inventor

Discuss.


I would think that there would be some loss of energy in heating the clay pots up. I would imagine any benefit of diffussing the heat would be negated by the loss of having to transfer the energy into the pot in the first place?
Energy is neither created nor destroyed unless you are doing nuclear reactions.

What occurs is the pots heat up slowly, and then radiate slowly. (And from my other post, in a different form of energy.)

The amount of heat is the same, but the amount of USABLE heat might be higher with the pots over them.

Also, it seems like that arrangement might be a lot safer than a dozen little candles all over the place with exposed flame.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:49:50 AM EST

It's common sense that it won't work in any cold climate. I have a 23k BTU kero heater in the basement. Last night it took 5 hours to raise the temp from 64 to 70 with an outdoor temp of low to mid 30s. No way would tea candles and clay pots work to heat my basement, but someone commented this can be used in a greenhouse to prevent a freeze. Now that I'm going to try.


Link Posted: 11/10/2013 6:50:34 AM EST
It really is quite simple. Clay pots will heat up much like dirt or rocks out in the wilderness. Instead of all the heat rising to the top, it's at a lower level where you can feel it when it gives off heat in the form of radiation. It's just a more efficient way to keep heat down low by you.

The best things you can always do is set up screens to direct radiation and insulate to keep heat in.

Basically this is 6 of one, half dozen of the other.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 7:13:16 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrHunterAZ:


Keep in mind that the inventor in the video was in a room that was about 200-300 sqft. My master bathroom is larger than his "apartment." I don't remeber anyone making claims on a 1,000 sqft apt.
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Originally Posted By MrHunterAZ:
Originally Posted By Cymro:
What I suspect is that burning four candles in the morning and four in the afternoon is raising the ambient temperature by about 15 degrees all day long, extrapolating from the math posted above and assuming we're heating an average British apartment (just under 1000sqf. I looked it up).

Given that room temperature in the UK is about 65F on average, I think we can all see where the mistakes come in.


Keep in mind that the inventor in the video was in a room that was about 200-300 sqft. My master bathroom is larger than his "apartment." I don't remeber anyone making claims on a 1,000 sqft apt.


That only magnifies my point. Perhaps I wasn't clear--I apologize for that. Four candles burning consistently over the course of a day is enough to raise the temperature of the average UK apartment significantly--never mind a workshop a fraction the size. I rather suspect that he mistook the overall thermal change brought by the candles for some imagined property of his device.

It reminds me of the post-hurricane blackouts, and how amazed some people get at the heat put out by oil lamps and candles.
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 1:22:21 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cymro:
I'm currently involved in an online argument with someone who insists that this thing works by channeling radiant heat and using it more efficiently, similar to the way a terracotta or cast iron woodstove does.

In doing some research to defend my own claims, I came across a snazzy quote from the creator of the device:

“Candle Holder does not “make” additional heat — what it does is short stop the loss of heat to the ceiling and creates a radiant heater at
table level. And it is almost always guys who over analyze this simple
device.” -Doyle Doss, inventor

Discuss.
View Quote


I would, but there's nothing to discuss, nor did this guy invent anything.
Yes, a couple candles can heat up a small place, not much bigger than a tent, 1º or 2º. Just as well, this guy could heat up a bit such a small place with a few cents worth of ANY fuel. There's no magic, no invention, and if you do believe there is let me tell you about this website electric companies dont want you to know about, that explains how to built your own free energy power plant using secret Stirling engine designs.

FerFAL
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 1:32:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cymro:


That only magnifies my point. Perhaps I wasn't clear--I apologize for that. Four candles burning consistently over the course of a day is enough to raise the temperature of the average UK apartment significantly--never mind a workshop a fraction the size. I rather suspect that he mistook the overall thermal change brought by the candles for some imagined property of his device.

It reminds me of the post-hurricane blackouts, and how amazed some people get at the heat put out by oil lamps and candles.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cymro:
Originally Posted By MrHunterAZ:
Originally Posted By Cymro:
What I suspect is that burning four candles in the morning and four in the afternoon is raising the ambient temperature by about 15 degrees all day long, extrapolating from the math posted above and assuming we're heating an average British apartment (just under 1000sqf. I looked it up).

Given that room temperature in the UK is about 65F on average, I think we can all see where the mistakes come in.


Keep in mind that the inventor in the video was in a room that was about 200-300 sqft. My master bathroom is larger than his "apartment." I don't remeber anyone making claims on a 1,000 sqft apt.


That only magnifies my point. Perhaps I wasn't clear--I apologize for that. Four candles burning consistently over the course of a day is enough to raise the temperature of the average UK apartment significantly--never mind a workshop a fraction the size. I rather suspect that he mistook the overall thermal change brought by the candles for some imagined property of his device.

It reminds me of the post-hurricane blackouts, and how amazed some people get at the heat put out by oil lamps and candles.


No man, it wouldnt. Even a small apartment,4 tea ikea candles would harldy increase the apartment temps maybe 0.5º, maybe 1º in a very small room like this guy.
But forget about "raise the temperature of the average UK apartment significantly", it just isnt true.
FerFAL
FerFAL
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 7:23:08 PM EST
How much lead is he breathing in from the Chinese wicks?
Link Posted: 11/10/2013 11:53:22 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:


yep I've done similar to that in the service, sitting with my M60 in the day time in a cold rain/snow mix. poncho over me, sterno can between my feet, heating a canteen cup of ramen. The platoon sergeat when he saw the steam flowing off me thought he was going to send me out to sick call with a hellacious fever. I should have let him!

Anyways yep that little bit of flame and a poncho (and of course the soup), and I was in much better shape in a short bit. Hot wets are good.

Similarly to that in my old Marine Corps repetoire; the arctic tents, we jammed packed extra guys in the tent and had one or two noco candle lanterns. In short order the sub zero temps were abated a bit to where you could take off a layer. (I concede the extra bodies processing MRE bean components may have been a factor as well)
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Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
Originally Posted By KingRat:
Throw a poncho over that tealight and you'll be nice and warm.


yep I've done similar to that in the service, sitting with my M60 in the day time in a cold rain/snow mix. poncho over me, sterno can between my feet, heating a canteen cup of ramen. The platoon sergeat when he saw the steam flowing off me thought he was going to send me out to sick call with a hellacious fever. I should have let him!

Anyways yep that little bit of flame and a poncho (and of course the soup), and I was in much better shape in a short bit. Hot wets are good.

Similarly to that in my old Marine Corps repetoire; the arctic tents, we jammed packed extra guys in the tent and had one or two noco candle lanterns. In short order the sub zero temps were abated a bit to where you could take off a layer. (I concede the extra bodies processing MRE bean components may have been a factor as well)


You're dating yourself....old fart!
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