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Posted: 10/6/2012 10:02:28 AM EDT
I have been eyeballing this knife for a while.
here
But I was curious as to if there is anything better out there.
I think the price is a bit high too.
What I want is fixed blade that has a kydex (or equivalent) sheath that is molle ready.
Partial Serration is cool, built in knife sharpener would be a bonus.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 10:37:44 AM EDT
The biggest problem about asking for knife opinions is, their the same as parts for an AR. Everyone has their own opinion on what's the best, and anyone who likes something different, doesn't know anything.
My favorites are Beckers BK9s and BK1s. Kabars, Rat knives, Ontario knives. There are kydex sheaths on the market for a lot of these knives. Rats are a bit more expensive, but for budget minded, Kabar and Ontario are great options for blades. I don't like anything under 7 inches for survival, and some of these are big blades for chopping small trees for shelter making.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 10:52:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By KnifeCollector:
The biggest problem about asking for knife opinions is, their the same as parts for an AR. Everyone has their own opinion on what's the best, and anyone who likes something different, doesn't know anything.
My favorites are Beckers BK9s and BK1s. Kabars, Rat knives, Ontario knives. There are kydex sheaths on the market for a lot of these knives. Rats are a bit more expensive, but for budget minded, Kabar and Ontario are great options for blades. I don't like anything under 7 inches for survival, and some of these are big blades for chopping small trees for shelter making.


great advice! ill check those out. i always buy X item then 2 days later someone shows me y item which is way nicer for less than x item.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 12:04:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/6/2012 2:47:48 PM EDT by FNFalGuy]
Gerber use to be my favorite knife maker. However, they went through a period of lack luster quality and I switched to Cold Steel and have never looked back!

Here's a great knife for a reasonable price point:

Cold Steel SRK
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 2:16:40 PM EDT
Take a look at the ESEE line of knives. Great knife for just a few bucks more.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:13:34 PM EDT
Barkriver Bravo 1
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:26:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By KnifeCollector:
The biggest problem about asking for knife opinions is, their the same as parts for an AR. Everyone has their own opinion on what's the best, and anyone who likes something different, doesn't know anything.
My favorites are Beckers BK9s and BK1s. Kabars, Rat knives, Ontario knives. There are kydex sheaths on the market for a lot of these knives. Rats are a bit more expensive, but for budget minded, Kabar and Ontario are great options for blades. I don't like anything under 7 inches for survival, and some of these are big blades for chopping small trees for shelter making.


this is good advise. everyone is going to have their opinion but the above options are all decent manufacturers with options that are at a price point that is reasonable. remember though, the best tool is the one you have when you need it, not the most expensive one that is at home attached to your BOB...goes for knives, BOB's, any kind of gear. its useless if you cannot access it when you need it.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:31:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FNFalGuy:
Gerber use to be my favorite knife maker. However, they went through a period of lack luster quality and I switched to Cold Steel and have never looked back!

Here's a great knife for a reasonable price point:

Cold Steel SRK


+10 on the Cold Steel.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:35:36 PM EDT
ESEE also sells clips that can make most kydex sheaths MOLLE compatable. TOPS knives are also a good brand to look at.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:41:13 PM EDT
Specifications and features:
Gerber LMF II Infantry fixed blade knife
4.84" partially serrated drop point blade
420HC stainless steel blade
Glass filled nylon handle with TPV overmold
Lashing holes for use as a spear
Low-profile ballistic nylon sheath with built in sharpener and fire-retardant coating
10.59" overall length
Weighs 11.4 ounces

420HC SS? No Thanks. When they were made with Gerber's other high carbon steel (sorry I don't recall the name) it was a pretty good knife. I don't think there are very many good knives using 420HC.

ESEE is a much better knife as is the Becker line.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:45:09 PM EDT
I really like the BK9.
I'd add a Mora, either the Robust or the 2000 and use the hell outa them, then see what they could do and add a 3rd. knife to fill the gaps.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 5:31:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Solace22:
I have been eyeballing this knife for a while.
here
But I was curious as to if there is anything better out there.
I think the price is a bit high too.
What I want is fixed blade that has a kydex (or equivalent) sheath that is molle ready.
Partial Serration is cool, built in knife sharpener would be a bonus.



It's a great knife and well worth that price. 4-5 years ago when I purchased that exact same knife it was $140 Not a full tang knife and was/is designed to cut thru fusalge and electrical as well as having a glass breaker on the handle tip.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 6:37:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Solace22:
I have been eyeballing this knife for a while.
here
But I was curious as to if there is anything better out there.
I think the price is a bit high too.
What I want is fixed blade that has a kydex (or equivalent) sheath that is molle ready.
Partial Serration is cool, built in knife sharpener would be a bonus.


Try LAPolicegear.com if you have your heart set on that one.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 6:59:02 PM EDT
Becker bk16
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 7:11:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kolonij2:
Originally Posted By KnifeCollector:
The biggest problem about asking for knife opinions is, their the same as parts for an AR. Everyone has their own opinion on what's the best, and anyone who likes something different, doesn't know anything.
My favorites are Beckers BK9s and BK1s. Kabars, Rat knives, Ontario knives. There are kydex sheaths on the market for a lot of these knives. Rats are a bit more expensive, but for budget minded, Kabar and Ontario are great options for blades. I don't like anything under 7 inches for survival, and some of these are big blades for chopping small trees for shelter making.


this is good advise. everyone is going to have their opinion but the above options are all decent manufacturers with options that are at a price point that is reasonable. remember though, the best tool is the one you have when you need it, not the most expensive one that is at home attached to your BOB...goes for knives, BOB's, any kind of gear. its useless if you cannot access it when you need it.


Another +1. The only thing I'll disagree on is the best length blade for said knife. 4"-5" is ideal for my purposes.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 7:56:16 PM EDT
I have the exact same knife but in all black. It was roughly a dollar or so less prime from amazon. I absolutely love mine. My knife collection is still quite humble so I can not comment on the others that are listed.

Also, this site popped up in a thread here a while back so I figured I would share it as it really helped me.

All about knives
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 11:34:19 PM EDT
The LMFII is a decent knife. It is on the heavy side, so depending on what you are doing, that could be a negative. A filet knife it ain't, but it can do a lot of tasks reasonably well (cut, baton, hammer, break glass, etc). A few have been damaged at the handle, due to abuse, so that appears to be the weak point. Since it's not full tang, it isn't as structurally strong as some others, but that is the result of the designers wanting to isolate the end cap from the rest of the blade.
Link Posted: 10/7/2012 5:13:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2012 5:14:53 AM EDT by ferfal308]
ESEE is pretty good, love their Junglas. Busse would be my top choice, Swamp Rat or Scrapyard are great Busse brands at a much cheaper price.
I still love Cold Steel but mostly for folders, their fixed blades are getting worse each year and there's actually too many fails to feel comfortable with them.
Falknivens are excellent knives too, but again, expensive.
For a budget beast of a knife look at Condor, Their Kumunga knife is on the sharp prybar category with well heat threated 1075 steel, in my opinion a better option than 1095 for a knife that may get to be abused beyond the typical uses of a knife. (hammering, digging, prying). It would need some work done to the handle to make it better and a better bevel angle but overal great budget knife.
The Condor Hudson Bay knife is also a very interesting budget choice.
FerFAL
Link Posted: 10/7/2012 5:39:05 PM EDT
Another thing to consider is what kind of knife do you want to maintain? Different steels, grind styles, edge bevels, rockwell hardness, etc., all factor in to how much work/special tools are needed to keep the knife in working order. Carbon steel knives are easy to keep sharp, but rust and the egde doesn't take a beating as well as some other steels. Higher end steels aren't as suseptible to corrosion, and hold an edge much better, but may require diamond stones to keep sharp. Then there is edge bevel. Cold Steel used to use an assymetrical edge with odd ass angles that were less than ideal. Lots of folk would end up reshaping the edge into a symmetrical angle but sacrificed some efficiency in the process, whether they realized it or not. Then there is the convex edge, which is by most accounts far superior to the angular edge, and fairly easy to maintain with simple tools. Unless you take a chunk out of the edge, then it is nearly impossible to fix without a belt grinder.

In the end, knives are a very personal choice, and there are a hundred variables that can factor into that choice. I would suggest reading as much as you can regarding how and why knives are made the way they are and use that knowledge to influence your decision, and not the claims of a multi million dollar marketing office or what someone else says is a good knife.

Thats not to say that the opinions of members here are invalid though. Lots of good suggestions in the other posts for some truly great blades for "survival" purposes. I think, however, that you should first understand what makes it a good knife for that purpose. Only then can you truly decide what knife is right for you. Unless of course, you have lots of money to burn....
Link Posted: 10/7/2012 5:47:49 PM EDT
There's one for $50.00 in the EE.
Link Posted: 10/7/2012 6:16:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2012 6:18:10 PM EDT by jcoffman55]
I'm not a huge fan of Gerber any more but, honestly, for the specific features you listed and the price of this knife, it's not a bad deal.

My opinion for you is that you might want to re-think the serrations. They are OK for an EDC pocket knife, but when you start using the knife out in the woods they are actually an annoying hinderence for a lot of tasks. If you re-think it and go with something else, I'd recommend the SRK. Personally I have a Falkniven F1 with the 3G steel, but it was quite a bit more expensive and not a molly sheath. The regular F1 with the VG-10 steel can be had for around a c note and is a hell of a knife. IMHO the giant knives like BK9's don't get carried by me much due to weight. I do a lot of backpack hiking and stuff like that never makes the trip more than once. Good luck with whatever you decide.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 12:06:30 AM EDT
Remy on here makes some real nice pieces. I bought two off him awhile back and have been beating the heck out of mine and the wife does the same to hers. Nice pieces nice prices. Prefer over my esee
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 12:51:46 AM EDT
ESEE 4" for me. Once you own one you will understand- there is a reason people recommend them- other members here tried a bunch of others and did the trial for you- you just have to read about it here. It's why ARFcom SF is one of the best on the net. Most of the guys that have been here a while, know just from other members experiences, you get what you pay for, and save money in the long run. You won't end up buying a bunch of things to eventually buy what you should have to begin with. The Gerber LMF is a nice knife, pretty solid and most here give it a thumbs up. Thats not enough for me personally to put money on one, but they are nice if that's your price range and you won't budge. I don't subscribe to that thought though.

Buy once, Cry once is my philosophy- like a lot of guys here. I never understood the, I will bet my life on this, but I don't want to spend more than $x.xx? When your life is gonna depend on it, money should not be a determining factor- but the most expensive ≠ best. Most things that are serious use items, durable, dependable, and quality though- surprise- COST SERIOUS MONEY. You gotta pay to play. Some guys like cheaper and more quantity. I don't have a ton of space for a lot of extra stuff so I buy quality and a spare- Two is one and one is none idea.

Partial serration is a PITA to keep sharp compared to plain edge. I don't buy knives with them anymore. Plain edge is quick and easy to maintain an edge. Buy a sharpening STONE and learn how to use it. Gadgets are neat and all, but a stone is light and reliable. Surprise- a good stone is gonna cost you too. It takes real practice to sharpen well.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 4:14:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Thumbtack:
ESEE 4" for me. Once you own one you will understand- there is a reason people recommend them- other members here tried a bunch of others and did the trial for you- you just have to read about it here. It's why ARFcom SF is one of the best on the net. Most of the guys that have been here a while, know just from other members experiences, you get what you pay for, and save money in the long run. You won't end up buying a bunch of things to eventually buy what you should have to begin with. The Gerber LMF is a nice knife, pretty solid and most here give it a thumbs up. Thats not enough for me personally to put money on one, but they are nice if that's your price range and you won't budge. I don't subscribe to that thought though.

Buy once, Cry once is my philosophy- like a lot of guys here. I never understood the, I will bet my life on this, but I don't want to spend more than $x.xx? When your life is gonna depend on it, money should not be a determining factor- but the most expensive ≠ best. Most things that are serious use items, durable, dependable, and quality though- surprise- COST SERIOUS MONEY. You gotta pay to play. Some guys like cheaper and more quantity. I don't have a ton of space for a lot of extra stuff so I buy quality and a spare- Two is one and one is none idea.

Partial serration is a PITA to keep sharp compared to plain edge. I don't buy knives with them anymore. Plain edge is quick and easy to maintain an edge. Buy a sharpening STONE and learn how to use it. Gadgets are neat and all, but a stone is light and reliable. Surprise- a good stone is gonna cost you too. It takes real practice to sharpen well.


And that's another downside to the Gerber LMF II - and it's little brother, the Prodigy. I have both knives, at least I did until the LMF got stolen last year. I won't buy a knife with serrations anymore, I used to be a fan. Like Thumbtack said: Lesson learned.

For the $60 or so you'll spend on a Gerber LMF II, you could spend that on a Becker Campanion and have a much higher quality and much more useful knife, IMO.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 4:28:32 AM EDT
Get it they have a good repuation. If it doesn't work for you, get something else with a good reputation. No one can tell you what the right knife is for you, they're like women, you got go through a few to figure out which is the one for you.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 6:09:38 AM EDT
Grew up using my dad's KaBar he got from our "Uncle" duirng the Korean War. It is still sharp and going strong. If you want a modern one-I have seen enw ones on-line from $53.88 to about $65.00 depending on blade options and sheaf options. Lot of bang for the buck. I also have the Cold Steel mentioned-SHARP right out of the box, love the handle. Can't go wrong with either, as far as I am comcerned.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 9:12:31 AM EDT
im looking for a camping type knife that I can use vs brush and logs etc. Similar to an axe but not entirely.
I am also looking for a self defense/utility type, which is where I was leaning that knife in my first post.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 10:58:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/8/2012 11:01:29 AM EDT by Keib]
I have the LMF II.
It's my "beater" knife and serves the role well. I don't hike with the thing, but it gets plenty of chores around camp.
It may be counter-intuitive, but I can't bring myself to abuse an expensive knife.
It is robust and comes with a decent sheath, although I don't use the sharpener.
Partial serration fits the bill for me, but I don't mind the extra sharpening.
It take and keeps an edge alright, but I don't do any fine work with it.
At its price-point, I still feel good about it a couple years later.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 11:00:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Solace22:
im looking for a camping type knife that I can use vs brush and logs etc. Similar to an axe but not entirely.
I am also looking for a self defense/utility type, which is where I was leaning that knife in my first post.


An axe it is not. You can baton with it and it will hack through vines, palmettos, branches, etc., but I would have other tools handy for the thick stuff.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 12:04:46 PM EDT


meet the EESE Izula

O.A Length: 6.25"
Blade Length (end of handle to tip): 2.88"
Cutting Edge Length: 2 5/8"
O.A. Blade Length: 2 3/4"
Maximum Thickness: .156"
Weight: 2 Ounces (Knife Only)
1095 Steel - 57 Rc.
Blade Width: 1.0"
Grind: Flat
Sheathing: Injection Molded, Black
Pommel: Hole To Accommodate Carabiner
Spine: Thumb Grippers
Finish: Textured Powder Coat
Colors: Black, OD Green, Desert Tan, Tactical Pink
Serial Number On Tang
MADE IN THE USA

Link Posted: 10/8/2012 12:09:58 PM EDT
Buy a hatchet if you need an axe but don't want to carry a full size. It works well enough to do a few tasks... I sure wouldn't want to use one full-time chopping though... you will wear your arms out in short order. Benefits of the longer axe handle is that it reduces the shock on your arms from the strike, and it is easy to swing without working up so much of a sweat (if you haven't used an axe very much and decide you need to use one... you are gonna sweat for a while while your learning, sorry that's just the way it is- muscles you haven't used will be sore.)

I think Hollywood has ingrained that a lot of this stuff is simple task stuff for the simple-minded... uh, no, there is technique involved. It's hard work that takes time to master the skill of using the tools to their full potential. You could go and beat up a tree to get it down, while Lunk the lumberjack knocks it down in a few well-placed strikes while not breaking a sweat. There is a reason people created tools that work better than others and the idea sold everywhere- IT WORKS. Trying to re-invent the wheel is futile and you will just hate yourself in the long run trying to use a knife to chop a tree down (akin to using a screwdriver to drive nails...) Can it be done- sure, doesn't mean you will enjoy it for long.

Part of us all telling you to buy a basic plain edge, heavy & thick knife is that you can use it to BATON your way through some wood to split it up. Batoning is when you put your knife edge on a piece of wood and drive it through following the grain with another piece of wood. It also takes a little practice to learn how to hold the knife and control your strikes... you can split wood in short order easily this way. I do it all the time in my shop with my ESEE4 to break up smaller wood for the wood stove to get a fire started when I am out of kiln dried stuff. Once you get the hang of it, it's easy and quicker than spending a half hour trying to find out where your hatchet walked off to.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 12:54:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Thumbtack:
Buy a hatchet if you need an axe but don't want to carry a full size. It works well enough to do a few tasks... I sure wouldn't want to use one full-time chopping though... you will wear your arms out in short order. Benefits of the longer axe handle is that it reduces the shock on your arms from the strike, and it is easy to swing without working up so much of a sweat (if you haven't used an axe very much and decide you need to use one... you are gonna sweat for a while while your learning, sorry that's just the way it is- muscles you haven't used will be sore.)

I think Hollywood has ingrained that a lot of this stuff is simple task stuff for the simple-minded... uh, no, there is technique involved. It's hard work that takes time to master the skill of using the tools to their full potential. You could go and beat up a tree to get it down, while Lunk the lumberjack knocks it down in a few well-placed strikes while not breaking a sweat. There is a reason people created tools that work better than others and the idea sold everywhere- IT WORKS. Trying to re-invent the wheel is futile and you will just hate yourself in the long run trying to use a knife to chop a tree down (akin to using a screwdriver to drive nails...) Can it be done- sure, doesn't mean you will enjoy it for long.

Part of us all telling you to buy a basic plain edge, heavy & thick knife is that you can use it to BATON your way through some wood to split it up. Batoning is when you put your knife edge on a piece of wood and drive it through following the grain with another piece of wood. It also takes a little practice to learn how to hold the knife and control your strikes... you can split wood in short order easily this way. I do it all the time in my shop with my ESEE4 to break up smaller wood for the wood stove to get a fire started when I am out of kiln dried stuff. Once you get the hang of it, it's easy and quicker than spending a half hour trying to find out where your hatchet walked off to.


yes this is exactly what I want to be able to do.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 1:22:59 PM EDT
Also, I would recommend a thinner smaller blade knife no more than 4" length for small tasks, peeling veggies/fruits, slicing, and skinning. Thick blades are tough, but not easy to work with all the time. A smaller blade comes in handy... A good folding pocket knife is great for this task and should be in your pocket at all times. I never go outside my house without a pocket knife. It was something that was instilled in my since I was boy. I am amazed how many people not only don't carry one- they don't even own one. These are the same people who constantly ask to use mine. Unfortunately, I had them a utility razor safety knife instead. Too many people get hurt using knives irresponsibly. You can baton wood with a folding pocket knife too... just start it gently with the blade locked, then unlock/fold the handle downwards and THEN strike the spine. Works well, but you will beat up thinner knives very quickly.

Also, don't be afraid to use an expensive knife for crap work, thats why you bought it. It's not a precious moments collectible. Sooner you get over it the better. You will wear a knife out/down. It supposed to be that way... you will have a lot of good memories by the time you wear out your 3rd or 4th one. Be proud of it and mount the old ones in your shop (I call my personal area/gun room/work area- my shop, cause that's what it is and you should have your space too.) for everyone to see and ask about it... Give you something to talk about and show other people about this stuff- it's slowly becoming a lost art.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 1:25:07 PM EDT
please forgive any typing errors, my netbook keyboard and mouse buttons are messed up and I am having a hard time typing with this dinky thing.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 2:38:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Merlin:
Originally Posted By Thumbtack:
ESEE 4" for me. Once you own one you will understand- there is a reason people recommend them- other members here tried a bunch of others and did the trial for you- you just have to read about it here. It's why ARFcom SF is one of the best on the net. Most of the guys that have been here a while, know just from other members experiences, you get what you pay for, and save money in the long run. You won't end up buying a bunch of things to eventually buy what you should have to begin with. The Gerber LMF is a nice knife, pretty solid and most here give it a thumbs up. Thats not enough for me personally to put money on one, but they are nice if that's your price range and you won't budge. I don't subscribe to that thought though.

Buy once, Cry once is my philosophy- like a lot of guys here. I never understood the, I will bet my life on this, but I don't want to spend more than $x.xx? When your life is gonna depend on it, money should not be a determining factor- but the most expensive ≠ best. Most things that are serious use items, durable, dependable, and quality though- surprise- COST SERIOUS MONEY. You gotta pay to play. Some guys like cheaper and more quantity. I don't have a ton of space for a lot of extra stuff so I buy quality and a spare- Two is one and one is none idea.

Partial serration is a PITA to keep sharp compared to plain edge. I don't buy knives with them anymore. Plain edge is quick and easy to maintain an edge. Buy a sharpening STONE and learn how to use it. Gadgets are neat and all, but a stone is light and reliable. Surprise- a good stone is gonna cost you too. It takes real practice to sharpen well.


And that's another downside to the Gerber LMF II - and it's little brother, the Prodigy. I have both knives, at least I did until the LMF got stolen last year. I won't buy a knife with serrations anymore, I used to be a fan. Like Thumbtack said: Lesson learned.

For the $60 or so you'll spend on a Gerber LMF II, you could spend that on a Becker Campanion and have a much higher quality and much more useful knife, IMO.

Good luck with whatever you decide.


I have a Becker Companion...it's on the thick side but bullet proof.
Link Posted: 10/8/2012 4:45:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Rudison:
Originally Posted By Merlin:
Originally Posted By Thumbtack:
ESEE 4" for me. Once you own one you will understand- there is a reason people recommend them- other members here tried a bunch of others and did the trial for you- you just have to read about it here. It's why ARFcom SF is one of the best on the net. Most of the guys that have been here a while, know just from other members experiences, you get what you pay for, and save money in the long run. You won't end up buying a bunch of things to eventually buy what you should have to begin with. The Gerber LMF is a nice knife, pretty solid and most here give it a thumbs up. Thats not enough for me personally to put money on one, but they are nice if that's your price range and you won't budge. I don't subscribe to that thought though.

Buy once, Cry once is my philosophy- like a lot of guys here. I never understood the, I will bet my life on this, but I don't want to spend more than $x.xx? When your life is gonna depend on it, money should not be a determining factor- but the most expensive ≠ best. Most things that are serious use items, durable, dependable, and quality though- surprise- COST SERIOUS MONEY. You gotta pay to play. Some guys like cheaper and more quantity. I don't have a ton of space for a lot of extra stuff so I buy quality and a spare- Two is one and one is none idea.

Partial serration is a PITA to keep sharp compared to plain edge. I don't buy knives with them anymore. Plain edge is quick and easy to maintain an edge. Buy a sharpening STONE and learn how to use it. Gadgets are neat and all, but a stone is light and reliable. Surprise- a good stone is gonna cost you too. It takes real practice to sharpen well.


And that's another downside to the Gerber LMF II - and it's little brother, the Prodigy. I have both knives, at least I did until the LMF got stolen last year. I won't buy a knife with serrations anymore, I used to be a fan. Like Thumbtack said: Lesson learned.

For the $60 or so you'll spend on a Gerber LMF II, you could spend that on a Becker Campanion and have a much higher quality and much more useful knife, IMO.

Good luck with whatever you decide.


I have a Becker Companion...it's on the thick side but bullet proof.

that knife looks awesome. I may try and get one of those.
Link Posted: 10/9/2012 4:40:15 AM EDT
I had a chance to get a Campanion several years ago at Knob Creek; I've always regretted not getting it.
Link Posted: 10/9/2012 5:59:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/9/2012 6:02:59 AM EDT by ugagrad06]
Originally Posted By Dodge223:
Becker bk16


while i'm not a fan of the bigger, "combat" style knives for anything, the Becker line is fantastic. They use great steel and are a great start to making your perfect, custom knife. The thing is, it's not difficult or expensive to get a bench grinder / belt sander and change the knife to your exact needs.

i prefer a small, BK-11 knife with a custom handle i made for all around camp use. Great for eating, digging around, gutting animals (use it on deer every year), and even filleting fishies (but not great).

for the big stuff, i have a kukri or axe. Then again, i don't plan on bugging out anywhere, so weight isn't a real issue for me.

started as this:


ended as this:


-n
Link Posted: 10/9/2012 6:25:24 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/9/2012 10:46:32 AM EDT
Busse Team Gemini Light Brigade with hand polished bevels to a mirror finish (by yours truely)

Think of it as a Kabar on steroids after a decade in the gym.
Beast of a knife for its size. Generally I preffer bigger but this one has an I beam profile full tang that sends the center of mass about half an inch above the cross guard, perfect for chopping. Using my hatchet side by side its got notihng on this knife yet it still shaves hair off my arm. I know these are kind of expensive but man, its a great knife, great steel.

FerFAL
Link Posted: 10/9/2012 1:42:22 PM EDT
Love my 6" ESEE! Becker was my second choice.
Link Posted: 10/9/2012 6:33:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ferfal308:
Busse Team Gemini Light Brigade with hand polished bevels to a mirror finish (by yours truely)
http://imageshack.us/a/img194/4865/img1235zv.jpg
Think of it as a Kabar on steroids after a decade in the gym.
Beast of a knife for its size. Generally I preffer bigger but this one has an I beam profile full tang that sends the center of mass about half an inch above the cross guard, perfect for chopping. Using my hatchet side by side its got notihng on this knife yet it still shaves hair off my arm. I know these are kind of expensive but man, its a great knife, great steel.

FerFAL




BEAUTIFUL!!!
Link Posted: 10/10/2012 5:09:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GENESMITH:
Originally Posted By ferfal308:
Busse Team Gemini Light Brigade with hand polished bevels to a mirror finish (by yours truely)
http://imageshack.us/a/img194/4865/img1235zv.jpg
Think of it as a Kabar on steroids after a decade in the gym.
Beast of a knife for its size. Generally I preffer bigger but this one has an I beam profile full tang that sends the center of mass about half an inch above the cross guard, perfect for chopping. Using my hatchet side by side its got notihng on this knife yet it still shaves hair off my arm. I know these are kind of expensive but man, its a great knife, great steel.

FerFAL




BEAUTIFUL!!!


Yea, just don't ask what it costs....
Link Posted: 10/10/2012 6:07:41 AM EDT
Op I have that same knife, I like it a lot, but don't try to gut a deer with it, in September I took it hunting and when I tried to gut my deer it just would not cut. It was new so it was factory sharp which is usually a lot sharper than I can get a knife. Other than that I love the fact you can strap the sheath anywhere, I carry it on my thigh.
Link Posted: 10/10/2012 6:39:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jcoffman55:
I'm not a huge fan of Gerber any more but, honestly, for the specific features you listed and the price of this knife, it's not a bad deal.

My opinion for you is that you might want to re-think the serrations. They are OK for an EDC pocket knife, but when you start using the knife out in the woods they are actually an annoying hinderence for a lot of tasks. If you re-think it and go with something else, I'd recommend the SRK. Personally I have a Falkniven F1 with the 3G steel, but it was quite a bit more expensive and not a molly sheath. The regular F1 with the VG-10 steel can be had for around a c note and is a hell of a knife. IMHO the giant knives like BK9's don't get carried by me much due to weight. I do a lot of backpack hiking and stuff like that never makes the trip more than once. Good luck with whatever you decide.


I think you'll find this to be true, and I'd add that they aren't much use on an EDC, either.

The knife is heavy, it doesn't hold an edge, it doesn't sharpen well, it's huge, the serrations are much less useful than you'd think and they reduce the useful blade length. The pommel feels like a problem waiting to happen. I'm not a fan, even though I was thoroughly stoked when it came in the mail and the price was right. It's zip-tied to my war belt because I wasn't sure where else to put it.

I'm in love with my Benchmade Griptilians, and the day my big fixed-blade was stolen was a terrible day. I hope whoever took it loses a finger to it. BM discontinued them as fixed-blade knives, so I had to decide between a Bone Collector version and an Nim Cub.

Link Posted: 10/10/2012 10:19:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By w12x40:
Originally Posted By jcoffman55:
I'm not a huge fan of Gerber any more but, honestly, for the specific features you listed and the price of this knife, it's not a bad deal.

My opinion for you is that you might want to re-think the serrations. They are OK for an EDC pocket knife, but when you start using the knife out in the woods they are actually an annoying hinderence for a lot of tasks. If you re-think it and go with something else, I'd recommend the SRK. Personally I have a Falkniven F1 with the 3G steel, but it was quite a bit more expensive and not a molly sheath. The regular F1 with the VG-10 steel can be had for around a c note and is a hell of a knife. IMHO the giant knives like BK9's don't get carried by me much due to weight. I do a lot of backpack hiking and stuff like that never makes the trip more than once. Good luck with whatever you decide.


I think you'll find this to be true, and I'd add that they aren't much use on an EDC, either.

The knife is heavy, it doesn't hold an edge, it doesn't sharpen well, it's huge, the serrations are much less useful than you'd think and they reduce the useful blade length. The pommel feels like a problem waiting to happen. I'm not a fan, even though I was thoroughly stoked when it came in the mail and the price was right. It's zip-tied to my war belt because I wasn't sure where else to put it.

I'm in love with my Benchmade Griptilians, and the day my big fixed-blade was stolen was a terrible day. I hope whoever took it loses a finger to it. BM discontinued them as fixed-blade knives, so I had to decide between a Bone Collector version and an Nim Cub.



Sounds about right, I dont like Gerber knives much. 1095, 1075 and 1055, Crmov8, those are ok when heat treated correctly. Gerber seems to have a blind chimp heat treating their knives. And many of their knives as just wrong, wrong, as in retarded designs that fall appart or even get people hurt. I suppose they've nailed it in terms of marketing becuase they do sell well, but overal Gerbers suck.
FerFAL
Link Posted: 10/10/2012 10:31:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By red99cobra:
Take a look at the ESEE line of knives. Great knife for just a few bucks more.

This. I'm not a "knife guy," but I got an ESEE-5 and it is just pure quality.

If not the ESEE, then I'd get a Becker over the Gerber LMF.
Link Posted: 10/10/2012 11:32:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2012 11:33:42 AM EDT by RatDrall]
Blah blah batoning.
yes this is exactly what I want to be able to do.


If you want a knife that is capable of processing wood by batoning it, look for any thick (3/16"+) bladed knife 4" long or more. No serrations.

I like a Bark River Bravo 1 because it is stout enough to baton with, but the convex edge allows me to slice like crazy for regular cutting tasks. I once split wood for a whole weekend camp trip when I forgot my axe at home, by the end of the weekend I could still shave hair with the knife.
Link Posted: 10/10/2012 1:06:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hater:

Originally Posted By red99cobra:
Take a look at the ESEE line of knives. Great knife for just a few bucks more.

This. I'm not a "knife guy," but I got an ESEE-5 and it is just pure quality.

If not the ESEE, then I'd get a Becker over the Gerber LMF.



This. Very happy with my ESEE-6 but I would be happy with a Becker.
Link Posted: 10/11/2012 1:30:13 AM EDT

Sounds about right, I dont like Gerber knives much. 1095, 1075 and 1055, Crmov8, those are ok when heat treated correctly. Gerber seems to have a blind chimp heat treating their knives. And many of their knives as just wrong, wrong, as in retarded designs that fall appart or even get people hurt. I suppose they've nailed it in terms of marketing becuase they do sell well, but overal Gerbers suck.
FerFAL


I don't know. I've seen some impressive destruction tests of the LMF II. It took a bit more abuse than I thought it would.
I still stand by my general disdain of serrations in a general use knife, and my comments about the LMF II being heavier than necessary for a knife that size.
Link Posted: 10/11/2012 6:47:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By raimius:

Sounds about right, I dont like Gerber knives much. 1095, 1075 and 1055, Crmov8, those are ok when heat treated correctly. Gerber seems to have a blind chimp heat treating their knives. And many of their knives as just wrong, wrong, as in retarded designs that fall appart or even get people hurt. I suppose they've nailed it in terms of marketing becuase they do sell well, but overal Gerbers suck.
FerFAL


I don't know. I've seen some impressive destruction tests of the LMF II. It took a bit more abuse than I thought it would.
I still stand by my general disdain of serrations in a general use knife, and my comments about the LMF II being heavier than necessary for a knife that size.


Do you have a link to the test? Maybe it was Noss, the guy from knifetest that wears a Hockey mask when doing the video torture tests.
FerFAL
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