Site Notices
11/28/2014 6:01:52 AM
11/27/2014 12:14:39 AM
Author
Message
a_number_1
Offline
Posts: 844
Feedback: 100% (52)
Posted: 7/5/2010 11:27:16 AM EST
I'm thinking about moving my chest freezer out of my heated basement, and into my unheated, but attached garage. The garage is adjoining the heated basement, and under the living room, so it stays relatively warm. The coldest it has been in 3 years is 34 degrees when outdoors it has been well below zero, and around zero for days in a row.

The current freezer is a 3 year old, 15cu.ft. Kenmore, but I'm considering picking up an large older upright from somewhere when opportunity knocks, so I'm curious about slightly older ones too.

I've heard mixed opinions on whether or not it's a good idea to put your freezer someplace unheated, thought I'd ask first.

Anyone have an opinion?
al_bundy
Offline
Posts: 2277
Feedback: 98% (65)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/5/2010 11:32:30 AM EST
I have a chest freezer in my unheated garage and never had a problem with it.

I think the key is to try and keep it as full as you can.
wildearp
Simple solutions to complex problems...
Military
Offline
Posts: 19466
Feedback: 100% (36)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/5/2010 11:36:41 AM EST
34 isn't cold. It will be fine. Install an alarm to tell you if it stops working or loses power.
If you are not living on the edge, you are taking up too much room!
Semper Fi, do or die!
NRA Life Member
SASS Life Member
BRONZ
You're Being Watched
Offline
Posts: 5874
Feedback: 100% (2)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/5/2010 11:42:57 AM EST
I have a upright freezer in my garage. Never had a problem.

Think about this. Does it work harder in the summer yes, then it should have to work less in the winter.
BRONZ

You never have trouble if you are prepared for it. T. Roosevelt

a_number_1
Offline
Posts: 845
Feedback: 100% (52)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/5/2010 12:07:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By al_bundy:
I think the key is to try and keep it as full as you can.


Sumbitch it always packed, that's why I need another.

Originally Posted By wildearp:
34 isn't cold. It will be fine. Install an alarm to tell you if it stops working or loses power.


No, it really isn't, but I don't want to assume anything considering the cost of the contents. I've been looking for a nice alarm, but I open the freezer almost daily for dinner, so it's been low priority.

Originally Posted By BRONZ:
Think about this. Does it work harder in the summer yes, then it should have to work less in the winter.


Sounds logical to me, I was hoping for a little added benefit from it.
midmo
Member
Offline
Posts: 477
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/5/2010 1:01:32 PM EST
I wouldn't worry about the cold. I've got a chest freezer in a detached shop that every winter gets well below zero... it just doesn't have to run the compressor to keep things cold .
The bigger problem is the summer, when it's 90-100F in there. Then it has to work a lot more than it would in the house. An insulating blanket or something like that helps; we kept the original cardboard box the freezer came in and use that (with a cutout for an air intake) to trap a layer of air next to the freezer.

"What luck for the rulers that men don't think." -- Adolf Hitler, April 1945
BiggEZ
Dump Truck Driver
Military
Offline
Posts: 1601
Feedback: 100% (122)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/5/2010 2:33:23 PM EST
My grandmother has one in her garage thats atleast 10-15 years old. Garage is unheated in the winter/uncooled in the summer. She has never had a problem with hers. Only thing she did was hook up a wireless temperature unit and has the receiver mounted in her kitchen. She checks it daily i'd imagine and changes the batteries as needed in the unit, it starts beepin and flashin when it's time to do so.
TN SQUIRE
PACK LARUE

WTB/WTT4: ALL LARUE TACTICAL SPECIAL EDITION BLACK AND COLORED DILLO'S, SHOT DILLOS, XMAS DILLOS, I HAVE LOTS OF STUFF TO TRADE, PLEASE IM ME ON HERE IF YOU HAVE DILLO'S YOU'D LIKE TO DISCUSS TRADING/SELLING. THANKS!!
happy_gopher
Cav-Aid 057,150, and 432
Offline
Posts: 1782
Feedback: 100% (77)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/5/2010 3:14:35 PM EST
mine is in my garage too. works fine.
"So this is how liberty dies......to thunderous applause"
Princess Amidala
rightwingnut
Offline
Posts: 3990
Feedback: 100% (57)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/6/2010 6:15:59 AM EST
make an R board enclosure for it in the summer so it doesnt' have to work so hard. Just make sure the hot car can come out the bottom.
dablues
Team Member
Offline
Posts: 2185
Feedback: 100% (1)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/6/2010 7:13:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/6/2010 7:43:39 AM EST by dablues]
An insulating blanket or something like that helps; we kept the original cardboard box the freezer came in and use that (with a cutout for an air intake) to trap a layer of air next to the freezer.


No. Do Not Do This.

On a chest freezer the outside walls radiate the heat away from the interior. Covering a chest freezer with insulation is like running a marathon wearing a parka.

Don't do it ! If it is an upright, and the coils are exposed on the back, then you could effectively wrap the rest of it in foam.

NOT on a chest freezer !!!!

here, look at this.... http://www.repairclinic.com/Freezer-Chest-Appliance-Diagram

All of the walls are heat exchanger surface.

The only time you would ever wrap a chest freezer is during a power outage, and you have no power.

The only two locations that could be insulated in normal use are the top and the floor, but not the walls. Glue some foam on the lid, set the unit on top a couple inches of foam to insulate the floor, but unless you are forcing air around the case with a computer fan, boxing it in defeats the purpose.





Chainsaw1
Member
Offline
Posts: 174
Feedback: 100% (36)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/6/2010 7:22:31 AM EST
The in-laws here in SW MO keep 2 freezer chests and a fridge in the car port with no problems.
machinisttx
Offline
Posts: 20182
Feedback: 100% (9)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/6/2010 7:48:24 AM EST
There is a 30+ year old chest type freezer out in my shop right now. As far as I know, it's never been in an air conditioned or heated area. My uncle's got a 50+ year old refrigerator sitting under the carport by his shop...most of it's life has been outside. Still keeps beer cold.
rightwingnut
Offline
Posts: 3991
Feedback: 100% (57)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/6/2010 12:42:05 PM EST
Originally Posted By dablues:
An insulating blanket or something like that helps; we kept the original cardboard box the freezer came in and use that (with a cutout for an air intake) to trap a layer of air next to the freezer.


No. Do Not Do This.

On a chest freezer the outside walls radiate the heat away from the interior. Covering a chest freezer with insulation is like running a marathon wearing a parka.

Don't do it ! If it is an upright, and the coils are exposed on the back, then you could effectively wrap the rest of it in foam.

NOT on a chest freezer !!!!

here, look at this.... http://www.repairclinic.com/Freezer-Chest-Appliance-Diagram

All of the walls are heat exchanger surface.

The only time you would ever wrap a chest freezer is during a power outage, and you have no power.

The only two locations that could be insulated in normal use are the top and the floor, but not the walls. Glue some foam on the lid, set the unit on top a couple inches of foam to insulate the floor, but unless you are forcing air around the case with a computer fan, boxing it in defeats the purpose.



Oops, thanks for letting me know. I thought it was like a house fridge where there was heat exchanger coils on the bottom w/ a fan that blew out the hot air & the sides & top were just inactive insulation.
dablues
Team Member
Offline
Posts: 2186
Feedback: 100% (1)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/6/2010 1:35:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/6/2010 3:08:35 PM EST by dablues]
Not at all.

You're welcome.

This is why SF is so good. Just the facts.

midmo
Member
Offline
Posts: 478
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/7/2010 10:31:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By rightwingnut:
Originally Posted By dablues:
An insulating blanket or something like that helps; we kept the original cardboard box the freezer came in and use that (with a cutout for an air intake) to trap a layer of air next to the freezer.


No. Do Not Do This.

On a chest freezer the outside walls radiate the heat away from the interior. Covering a chest freezer with insulation is like running a marathon wearing a parka.

Don't do it ! If it is an upright, and the coils are exposed on the back, then you could effectively wrap the rest of it in foam.

NOT on a chest freezer !!!!

here, look at this.... http://www.repairclinic.com/Freezer-Chest-Appliance-Diagram

All of the walls are heat exchanger surface.

The only time you would ever wrap a chest freezer is during a power outage, and you have no power.

The only two locations that could be insulated in normal use are the top and the floor, but not the walls. Glue some foam on the lid, set the unit on top a couple inches of foam to insulate the floor, but unless you are forcing air around the case with a computer fan, boxing it in defeats the purpose.



Oops, thanks for letting me know. I thought it was like a house fridge where there was heat exchanger coils on the bottom w/ a fan that blew out the hot air & the sides & top were just inactive insulation.


+1
The cardboard, she is off!
"What luck for the rulers that men don't think." -- Adolf Hitler, April 1945
VaFarmBoy
Member
Offline
Posts: 2814
Feedback: 100% (10)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/7/2010 2:30:55 PM EST
My parents have had two chest freezers in an unheated and attached garage for 35 years with no problems, and no repairs. They have another in an unattached shed for at least that long.

Rest easy and go for it.
wingnutx
Barry Goldwater for Emperor
Military
Offline
Posts: 12299
Feedback: 100% (1)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/7/2010 2:58:46 PM EST
I have a freezer in my utility room. It did fine when it was 115 the other day.

Watch out for this, though:

TANSTAAFL

National pride is to countries what self-respect is to individuals: a necessary condition for self-improvement. - Richard Rorty
cvAR15
Behind Enemy Lines
Offline
Posts: 84
Feedback: 100% (4)
Link To This Post
Posted: 7/8/2010 12:52:54 AM EST
Our temps top out in the 125 degree region around here, and our chest freezer from home depot has been running great for 7 years. Just like others have said keep it full, if you can't I recommend you almost fill (water expands when you freeze it) some 2-liter soda bottles to take up the excess space and provide for support of the freezer.