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2/23/2017 5:55:53 PM
Posted: 8/11/2013 1:10:11 PM EST
Im currently living full time in a 30 foot travel trailer. I bought one with the " polar" option. That means the underbelly is insulated and covered, and the holding tanks are heated as well. I'm looking for ideas to keep the wind from blowing under my trailer. Needs to look good, and be removable.

Link Posted: 8/11/2013 3:50:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/11/2013 3:53:04 PM EST by toadmeister]
Square hay bales. By them cheap and stack them deep . Really, jst around the perimeter should be good.

I have a similar camper with slide-outs. Lots of gaps and lost heat in those cracks. Caulk them sfrom the outside and peel them ff in the spring.
Link Posted: 8/11/2013 10:04:27 PM EST
Anything that will block the wind will help a great deal.

For something that is quick and easy to use and easy to take down and transport try some courregated galvanized sheets of "tin".
Link Posted: 8/12/2013 2:17:49 PM EST
I knew a family of three that spent a winter in such a unit. They used plywood.
Link Posted: 8/12/2013 2:29:11 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NE450No2:
Anything that will block the wind will help a great deal.

For something that is quick and easy to use and easy to take down and transport try some courregated galvanized sheets of "tin". OR Lexan roofing panels
View Quote

Link Posted: 8/12/2013 4:12:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DanaHillen:

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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DanaHillen:
Originally Posted By NE450No2:
Anything that will block the wind will help a great deal.

For something that is quick and easy to use and easy to take down and transport try some courregated galvanized sheets of "tin". OR Lexan roofing panels

Yup. Skirt it
Link Posted: 8/12/2013 6:13:44 PM EST
Look to the "mobile home" industry. They have a "top channel" that can be attached permanently that you probably wouldn't even see from a distance. Then you can use cheap interlocking vinyl soffit cut to size. It locks together for the run, then disassembles into small(20-24 inch?) sections for storage. Very lightweight. The bottom channel could be cut to workable lengths and attached to the ground with gutter spikes(reusable) if on the ground or maybe a bead here and there of some caulking if on pavement. It wouldn't hurt to incorporate a vented panel on at least each end to cut down on moisture and condensation underneath...

I can give you more info if you want to message me....
(NOT a salesman- worked in or around the mobile home industry for the last 30 years...)

Link Posted: 8/12/2013 6:31:19 PM EST
2" XPS - paint as needed.
Link Posted: 8/14/2013 10:52:00 AM EST
Hay bales.
Link Posted: 8/14/2013 3:28:59 PM EST
you could use lexan/plastic/1/4 plywood, mount it onto the frame with a hinge so then you can fold it up under the trailer for transport crawl under and unhook and let it swing down and make a skirt
Link Posted: 8/20/2013 6:05:25 PM EST
Not sure if Coroplast would be rigid enough, but it comes in 4'x8' sheets and is thin and light and relatively cheap.
Link Posted: 8/20/2013 7:33:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2013 9:05:11 AM EST by Bend]
Snap-on vinyl skirts are commonly used. However, they are generally custom made. Most RV dealers can give a contact recommendation. Otherwise, go with straw bales.
Link Posted: 8/22/2013 7:45:16 AM EST
Come to find out they do not allow any type of skirting at the rv park. I like full timing but I'm worried about the winter in Mo. I have been looking into getting a true RV. Something that a built in underbelly with insulation and more storage.
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