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NCmedic  [Member]
11/2/2010 5:18:02 PM EST
Hello,
I have very little experience in the world of shooting. But I have been longing to get into the sport for awhile.
I'm interested in rifles and precision rifle marksmanship.

I don't own any rifles, so I am looking for some advice on what guns and equipment to purchase for training.
I plan on attending an Appleseed event which recommends bringing a .22lr and a centerfire rifle.

For the .22lr, from reading the threads, I was looking into the Marlin 795 and buying the tech-sights for that.

As for the centerfire rifles, I am clueless and was wanting to see if anyone could provide guidance for me.

After the Appleseed event, I am planning on taking a Precision Rifle course, so I am unsure of what centerfire rifles to purchase that will allow me to
train at these ranges. And also the appropriate scope and ammo as well.

I will continue to search the threads, but I just need a good direction to head.

Thanks everyone
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strat81  [Team Member]
11/2/2010 7:10:05 PM EST
What is your budget?

Regardless of that, the Remington 700 and Savage 10 and 110 are some of the most popular bolt-action rifles available. They're available in various forms with correspondingly various prices. Their prevalence translates to strong aftermarket and gunsmith support.
NCmedic  [Member]
11/2/2010 8:33:00 PM EST
My budget within that range of rifles you provided. I would like to get a high-quality rifle that will last and perform well.

I will do some research on the Remington 700 and Savage 10 and 110.

There are many different variables of the Remington 700 and Savage 10, are there many differences in each models?
NCmedic  [Member]
11/3/2010 9:57:54 AM EST
I'm looking into the Remington 700 P .308
Just wanted to hear thoughts on this rifle?
strat81  [Team Member]
11/3/2010 3:24:36 PM EST
Originally Posted By NCmedic:
My budget within that range of rifles you provided. I would like to get a high-quality rifle that will last and perform well.

I will do some research on the Remington 700 and Savage 10 and 110.

There are many different variables of the Remington 700 and Savage 10, are there many differences in each models?


Yes and no. The basic actions are generally the same, but triggers, stocks, barrels, finishes, etc. can all be different.

You might want to check out the Precision Rifle forum in the Armory section.
darktide  [Team Member]
11/15/2010 1:52:46 PM EST
I love the 10/22 with tech-sights if you're going for straight "building blocks of marksmanship" work =)

Budget ar-15's can be had for $600 or so, and are easy and modular... not so 'precision' most of the time though...

a remington 700 is extremely modular and customizable, but I honestly prefer the Savage 10fp... the trigger on these is pretty slick, and right out of the box they are great.

Optics are difficult to recommend w/o a budget, but Honestly a fixed 10x "SS" scope from SWFA is easily had for <$400, and are DAMN good...
NCmedic  [Member]
11/22/2010 10:49:44 AM EST
I was looking at rifles under $1000.
It seemed to me it come down to Remington 700 or Savage 10

I was personally looking at Remington 700 Police.
Any other rifles to consider in this price range?
Interceptor_Knight  [Member]
11/24/2010 2:00:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By NCmedic:
I was looking at rifles under $1000.
It seemed to me it come down to Remington 700 or Savage 10

I was personally looking at Remington 700 Police.
Any other rifles to consider in this price range?


700SPS Tactical will give you a .5MOA rifle and leave you hundred to spend on your optics. The 700SPS Varmint and Tactical both use the same quality barrels that the 700P uses but the stocks are cheaper. The SPS Tactical has a pillar bedded Hogue Overmolded Stock. The 700P uses a HS Precision stock with a full aluminum block and has wide palm swells. The 20" barrel in the SPS Tactical does not cost you velocity unless you hand load for the 26" barrel.
peasant  [Team Member]
11/24/2010 2:49:00 AM EST
Start with a good .22 LR. and practice out to 100-200 yards using both iron sights and scoped. There are a LOT of basics you learn on .22 LR and it's waaaaaay cheaper than centerfire. Believe me, you can drop $1000 just starting out on a .22.
NCmedic  [Member]
11/25/2010 6:23:16 AM EST
That's what I am doing. I have bought a .22 and am going to an Appleseed to learn the basics and get some good practicing in,
I'm planning on taking a Precision Rifle course in May, so from here till now I get to research and decide what rifle and optic I want to begin with,

uscombatdiver  [Member]
1/8/2011 7:36:38 AM EST
A bit of truth, whatever you spend on your rifle plan on spending as much or more on your optics. This is something (like many) I have tried to ignore the truth of and have paid more than I would have if I had just gotten a good optic to begin with. Granted Leupolds, Zeis and Swarovski tend to show up regularly, but from what I have read Super Sniper (SWFA) are not bad beginner scopes with a 10x42 starting at $300 rather than the $500-$2000 price tag. Of course, there are other important tools of the sport which include things like ballistic calculators (both digital and analog), ranging systems (from mildot to laser) and even more. Keep this in mind and you won't be too disappointed, but many get burned out by the price of it all.
BRONZ  [Team Member]
6/22/2011 12:36:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By peasant:
Start with a good .22 LR. and practice out to 100-200 yards using both iron sights and scoped. There are a LOT of basics you learn on .22 LR and it's waaaaaay cheaper than centerfire. Believe me, you can drop $1000 just starting out on a .22.


This

Don't start with a .308. Bad things can be learned from the recoil.
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