AR15.Com Archives
 Need advice on NYC parking violation judgement (unjustified)
mchad  [Member]
10/27/2011 9:42:59 AM
Background: I sold a car in a private sale in October of 2010. Obtained a copy of a signed bill of sale. Scraped off the reg. Surrendered the plates to DMV the next day, and cancelled insurance. In Feb, I got three notifications of unpaid parking tickets under the plate # I had (the ones I surrendered), each violation issued no earlier then a month after the car was sold. I responded to each online, claiming the vehicle was sold, and included scans of the bill of sale, the plate surrender receipt and the letter of cancellation from my insurance.

One of the judges dismissed the ticket, stating that I made an approrpiate defence. The second, adjourned it, saying I needed to provide evidence, such as a bill of sale, plate surrender rcpt, etc. (all of which I included in the original dispute). So I mailed (certified) more copies. Didn't hear anything from the 3rd.

Yesterday I got a notice of judgement on the third. When i called the helpful moron who answered the DoF phone, his educated response was "you gotta pay it I guess".

So I am NOT going to pay for a ticket I am not liable for. It's not the $100, which I would pay just to make this go away, but I don't want to set a precedent that I am admitting to guilt by paying it... Especially if this jackass racks up more tickets. Let's not even ask how they allow a car with no plates to get ticketed for a "no parking" violation and not tow it away...

Anyway, wtf can I do? Do i need to appear in court with my evidence? I'm not happy with having to take a day off work to go to Rector St all the way downtown to fight this, and I'm afraid I'll get locked up for contempt if the judge gives me a hard time (not really, just saying). I just don't understand how they can ignore the seemingly indisputable evidence I have.

I'm very frustrated...

Any suggestions?
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batjka104  [Member]
10/27/2011 11:03:23 AM
Just go downtown with the evidence and you'll be OK. I just had a capricious summons dismissed there. The judge looked at the evidence and dismissed it. I didn't even have to say anything. So no worries. Also, I went there at 3:30 pm and was out by 4:15. No need to take the whole day off.

Good luck.
Abom  [Member]
10/27/2011 11:10:24 AM
Why should you have to do a anything?

Send it to the AG's office and tell them to take care of it. CC: the NYC court and it'll probably go away real fast, they won't want to tangle with the AG.
Phil_A_Steen  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 12:00:05 PM

Originally Posted By Abom:
Why should you have to do a anything?

Send it to the AG's office and tell them to take care of it. CC: the NYC court and it'll probably go away real fast, they won't want to tangle with the AG.

This advice is nice in theory but won't work.

You need to keep after it. Unfortunately the only way to deal with this effectively is to fight each ticket and continue doggedly following up, and appeal when necessary.

One zany suggestion: you might write to Gridlock Sam, and see if he can help.
Aimless  [Site Staff]
10/27/2011 12:30:34 PM
I had a ticket on Long Island for a plate that had been reported stolen with the other plate being turned into the DMV. The ticket was about 4 months later. I wrote to the Court with documentation and got a notice that the fine was increased and that I could pay it or go to trial. Could never get anyone on the phone so finally (never did this before or since)I filed a complaint with the Office of Court Administration in Albany. Judge called me and assured me the ticket was dismissed a few days later.

Weird system the notices I was getting said they were from the Court but the address (according to the Judge's secretary) was some debt collector. No idea how they can legally do that.

Extorris  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 1:44:40 PM
Originally Posted By mchad:
Let's not even ask how they allow a car with no plates to get ticketed for a "no parking" violation and not tow it away.

Easy, cop was too lazy to do the paperwork required to tow it away. (Rotation Tow)


Lion  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 2:24:52 PM

Originally Posted By Extorris:
Originally Posted By mchad:
Let's not even ask how they allow a car with no plates to get ticketed for a "no parking" violation and not tow it away.

Easy, cop was too lazy to do the paperwork required to tow it away. (Rotation Tow)



Extorris - one of the very few LEOs who will just tell it like it is.

rkbar15  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 2:57:38 PM
Welcome to the club. I had several parking tickets issued for a vehicle I owned that was never parked on a NYC street. Don't get me started on the NYC Family Court SCU judgement I got served with for a child I would have had to father when I was 12 years old and living in Jamaica, West Indies. Fucking assholes.
Aimless  [Site Staff]
10/27/2011 2:59:14 PM

Originally Posted By rkbar15:
Welcome to the club. I had several parking tickets issued for a vehicle I owned that was never parked on a NYC street. Don't get me started on the NYC Family Court SCU judgement I got served with for a child I would have had to father when I was 12 years old and living in Jamaica, West Indies. Fucking assholes.

Deadbeat dad
mchad  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 3:30:46 PM
FFS- Having to deal with this at my expense and time, all just to clear tickets I shouldn't have gotten in the first place. (not to mention that it is public record that s) the plates were surrendered to DMV and b) an ALJ found my evidence valid enough to dismiss the first one of the three...)

Were the shoe on the other foot, im sure the city would be happily sueing me for the time and expence cost of their personnel to deal with something like this.

I guess I'll have to just show up at 66 John Street with my paperwork and see what happens.
rkbar15  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 3:34:26 PM

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By rkbar15:
Welcome to the club. I had several parking tickets issued for a vehicle I owned that was never parked on a NYC street. Don't get me started on the NYC Family Court SCU judgement I got served with for a child I would have had to father when I was 12 years old and living in Jamaica, West Indies. Fucking assholes.

Deadbeat dad

I had to file an order to show cause to get their fucking attention not to mention impersonating the real father in Brooklyn FC to get a copy of the restricted FC file. It took six months to get the judgement vacated and even then the NYC SCU never acknowledged it was mistakenly associated with my SSN and issued in my name. The only item I got from them was an account statement that indicated "my" account was up to date and no longer in default.

The irony was that the real father was never in default to begin with. His youngest child had turned 21 and he had filed the appropriate paperwork with the FC to terminate the support order which only took them a year to finally act on. In the interim the SCU obtained a default judgement and attempted to garnish his wages which some fucking NYC SCU pinhead mistakenly plugged my SSN into the system and I ended up with the judgement. I also had to get the three major credit reporting bureaus to delete the erroneous judgement from my credit history file.

Some day I'm going to write a book about all my misadventures in life.

mchad  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 3:35:45 PM
Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:

One zany suggestion: you might write to Gridlock Sam, and see if he can help.


You know, I actually knew Sam Schwartz. I met him several times while I dated his cousin's daughter about 18 years ago. IIRC the break up wasn't a bad one, so maybe I'll reach out.

Thats funny.
Extorris  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 4:58:11 PM
Originally Posted By Lion:
Originally Posted By Extorris:
Originally Posted By mchad:
Let's not even ask how they allow a car with no plates to get ticketed for a "no parking" violation and not tow it away.

Easy, cop was too lazy to do the paperwork required to tow it away. (Rotation Tow)

Extorris - one of the very few LEOs who will just tell it like it is.

Well it is more paperwork than most cops want to do. Motor Vehicle Invoice, Owner Notification Letter, computer print outs, Ro-Tow log, etc....
rkbar15  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 6:56:01 PM

Originally Posted By Extorris:

Well it is more paperwork than most cops want to do. Motor Vehicle Invoice, Owner Notification Letter, computer print outs, Ro-Tow log, etc....


No inventory?
Extorris  [Team Member]
10/27/2011 6:57:23 PM
Originally Posted By rkbar15:
Originally Posted By Extorris:
Well it is more paperwork than most cops want to do. Motor Vehicle Invoice, Owner Notification Letter, computer print outs, Ro-Tow log, etc....

No inventory?

It all gets listed on the Motor Vehicle Invoice.
rkbar15  [Team Member]
10/28/2011 11:45:22 AM

Originally Posted By Extorris:
Originally Posted By rkbar15:
Originally Posted By Extorris:
Well it is more paperwork than most cops want to do. Motor Vehicle Invoice, Owner Notification Letter, computer print outs, Ro-Tow log, etc....

No inventory?

It all gets listed on the Motor Vehicle Invoice.

Yeah, I thought the MVI might include a vehicle property inventory.



shocktrp  [Team Member]
10/29/2011 4:17:10 AM
I got a notice in the mail for not responding to a ticket for illegally parking in midtown Manhattan - but the time on the ticket was at the exact same time I was in Amityville.

I went back in forth with them a few times (to include sending a credit card receipt for a purchase made in Amityville).

They still found me guilty & kept increasing the fine $20 a month - now threatening to seize the vehicle if they found it parked on a NYC street.

My final correspondence to them was another copy of my documents along with a note that read something like, "Still not guilty & still not paying. I don't ever park on NYC streets but feel free to tow it & auction it off if you find it there".

Several months later, after the fine grew to about $300, I got a notice from some other judge - stating that the city was dropping the charges without admitting liability.

I guess they figured out that they had a brownie writing fake tickets to make quota.
mchad  [Team Member]
10/29/2011 9:12:02 AM
Originally Posted By shocktrp:
I got a notice in the mail for not responding to a ticket for illegally parking in midtown Manhattan - but the time on the ticket was at the exact same time I was in Amityville.

I went back in forth with them a few times (to include sending a credit card receipt for a purchase made in Amityville).

They still found me guilty & kept increasing the fine $20 a month - now threatening to seize the vehicle if they found it parked on a NYC street.

My final correspondence to them was another copy of my documents along with a note that read something like, "Still not guilty & still not paying. I don't ever park on NYC streets but feel free to tow it & auction it off if you find it there".

Several months later, after the fine grew to about $300, I got a notice from some other judge - stating that the city was dropping the charges without admitting liability.

I guess they figured out that they had a brownie writing fake tickets to make quota.


Well, I basically never drive or park in the city, so i'm not worried about a tow as well, but I am concerned that this may show up on my credit report, as the judgement notice threatens. Or is that an empty threat on their part.
Extorris  [Team Member]
10/29/2011 9:17:58 AM
Originally Posted By shocktrp:
I guess they figured out that they had a brownie writing fake tickets to make quota.

That's probably exactly what it was.
rkbar15  [Team Member]
10/29/2011 11:25:11 AM

Originally Posted By mchad:

Well, I basically never drive or park in the city, so i'm not worried about a tow as well, but I am concerned that this may show up on my credit report, as the judgement notice threatens. Or is that an empty threat on their part.


December 3, 2010

New York City Cracks Down on Tickets Left Unpaid



Facing severe financial woes, New York is pursuing deadbeats who have long seemed to thumb their noses at the city with impunity, the hundreds of thousands of scofflaws who have accumulated a total of nearly $700 million in overdue parking fines.

In the world of the city’s parking wars, their defiance has been something of a longstanding joke: drivers with a stash of tickets stuffed in their glove compartments.

Payback time, the city says, has arrived.

Using a variety of bludgeons in its arsenal and enlisting collection agencies, the city is more assertively tracking down scofflaws to seize their cars or other assets. With a budget gap of $3.3 billion to close, city officials say every dollar owed New York matters.

"We have not taken anywhere near an aggressive enough posture to collect this money,” said David M. Frankel, the city’s finance commissioner, who has made dragooning those who ignore their tickets a top priority since he started the job last year. "We’re going to take a much more aggressive stand.”

That includes exercising legal powers the city has never fully deployed.

While the city’s practice was to let overdue fines accumulate to $800 or more before giving them to collection agencies, now any amount owed can set off the hunt for payment. The Finance Department recently sent agencies paperwork for $209 million in outstanding fines — owed by 446,000 vehicle owners for 1.4 million tickets — for collection.

Until now, vehicle owners who amassed $350 or more in parking ticket debts could not renew their registration when it expired. The city is now inflicting greater pain by not waiting until the renewal deadline, but instead suspending the registration of any car owner who is delinquent on at least five violations within 12 months.

The city is also starting to more vigorously pursue New York drivers who register their cars in states with lower insurance rates and those who moved away leaving behind unpaid fines.

While it is too early to assess whether the city’s strong-arm strategy is working, the effort underscores its determination and financial desperation.

In the past, the city would sometimes allow legal judgments against scofflaws to languish too long unenforced, Mr. Frankel said. But with the total of parking fines owed the city climbing to $680 million since 2002, it was too large a pot of money to leave alone.

Mr. Frankel "was hired to make this agency as efficient as possible and collect the revenue that is owed,” a spokesman, Owen Stone, said.

About $440 million is outstanding in judgments for parking tickets, including the $209 million sent to collection agencies several weeks ago. The city is also seeking judgments against as much as $240 million more in overdue fines that date to 2002. Under the statute of limitations, fines are enforceable for eight years.

Most of the major scofflaws are commercial-truck leasing companies, some of which have gone out of business. But the city’s list of the top 10 ticket debtors also includes several individuals, led by Anthony Torres, a 41-year-old airport security worker who lives in Kingsbridge Heights, the Bronx, and who the city says owes $57,526 for parking illegally.

In an interview, Mr. Torres explained that the tickets were accumulated by a friend who had worked for him for several years, making deliveries using Mr. Torres’s van. The friend, he said, moved to the Dominican Republic. Mr. Torres said that the van was repossessed about two years ago and that while he had been trying to pay off the overdue parking fines, doing so was difficult because he made only $7.50 an hour.

"I learned my lesson: Don’t trust your friends,” Mr. Torres said. "Hopefully, things will turn around and I’ll be able to do the right thing and pay off my debt.”

The scofflaw list is led by AA Truck Renting in Long Island City, Queens, which owed $191,643 and is arranging with the city to pay off pending tickets incurred by its customers. The city can seize a commercial scofflaw’s assets, just as it can with an individual.

Paul Lanciotti, the company’s controller, said the double-parkers were not the company’s employees, but rather its customers. But Mr. Lanciotti acknowledged, "Ultimately we are responsible because we are the registered owner.”

The breakdown of vehicles registered to New York scofflaws who were ticketed in 2010, and against whom a judgment was entered as of Aug. 1, was led by passenger vehicles ($19,625,892), followed by commercial vehicles ($2,134,841), taxis ($949,065) and rented vehicles ($273,987).

The city can seek a judgment from an administrative law judge against an owner who fails to pay or to appeal a ticket after 90 days. The judgment, which can be enforced by city marshals and the city sheriff, empowers the city to garnishee wages or seize assets to satisfy the debt.

Of the $440 million in administrative law judgments already entered against scofflaws, $354 million is from vehicles with passenger plates, $34.5 million from those with commercial plates and $51.2 million from vehicles with a variety of special plates, including taxis, rental cars, voluntary ambulances and public officials. About $150 million of the $440 million is owed on vehicles with out-of-state license plates, more than half of which is owed by plate holders from New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut.

But the city is also owed $11 million from Florida vehicles, $9.3 million from North Carolina, $6.7 million from Massachusetts, $5 million from Virginia, $4.6 million from Georgia, $4.1 million from Maryland and $2.6 million from South Carolina.

Of the roughly 10 million tickets processed annually by the Finance Department, 5 percent — about 500,000 — are deemed not "processable,” meaning the owner or vehicle cannot be identified or found because the ticket was illegible, information was entered incorrectly or some other problem was involved.

Of the rest, about 60 percent are paid, 14 percent are dismissed after an owner presents evidence and 15 percent are reversed after an owner appeals a ticket that was not dismissed. In any given year, about 6 percent of fines are never paid.

"We’re going to do everything we can to find them,” Mr. Frankel, the finance commissioner, said.

The city’s forceful campaign against scofflaws is a combination of policy changes and computer databases that make debtors easier to find. "We are analyzing data, building models and reforming processes that in some cases have been in place for decades,” said Mr. Stone, the Finance Department spokesman.

Some states were charging the city $9 for a driver’s address, but the city is making greater use of collection agencies that can do the job — tracking down the scofflaw and demanding payment — for less. As a result, the city now has access to registration data from all 50 states, including those where pursuing vehicle owners seemed too expensive.

"For years, the tax collector was viewed as the horrible Sheriff of Nottingham,” Mr. Frankel said. "That’s not what we’re doing. We’re trying to protect people who are doing what they are supposed to do from a smaller group of people who say, ‘Come find us.’ ”


shocktrp  [Team Member]
10/29/2011 3:59:11 PM
Originally Posted By rkbar15:

Originally Posted By mchad:

Well, I basically never drive or park in the city, so i'm not worried about a tow as well, but I am concerned that this may show up on my credit report, as the judgement notice threatens. Or is that an empty threat on their part.


December 3, 2010

New York City Cracks Down on Tickets Left Unpaid



Facing severe financial woes, New York is pursuing deadbeats who have long seemed to thumb their noses at the city with impunity, the hundreds of thousands of scofflaws who have accumulated a total of nearly $700 million in overdue parking fines.

In the world of the city’s parking wars, their defiance has been something of a longstanding joke: drivers with a stash of tickets stuffed in their glove compartments.

Payback time, the city says, has arrived.

Using a variety of bludgeons in its arsenal and enlisting collection agencies, the city is more assertively tracking down scofflaws to seize their cars or other assets. With a budget gap of $3.3 billion to close, city officials say every dollar owed New York matters.

"We have not taken anywhere near an aggressive enough posture to collect this money,” said David M. Frankel, the city’s finance commissioner, who has made dragooning those who ignore their tickets a top priority since he started the job last year. "We’re going to take a much more aggressive stand.”

That includes exercising legal powers the city has never fully deployed.

While the city’s practice was to let overdue fines accumulate to $800 or more before giving them to collection agencies, now any amount owed can set off the hunt for payment. The Finance Department recently sent agencies paperwork for $209 million in outstanding fines — owed by 446,000 vehicle owners for 1.4 million tickets — for collection.

Until now, vehicle owners who amassed $350 or more in parking ticket debts could not renew their registration when it expired. The city is now inflicting greater pain by not waiting until the renewal deadline, but instead suspending the registration of any car owner who is delinquent on at least five violations within 12 months.

The city is also starting to more vigorously pursue New York drivers who register their cars in states with lower insurance rates and those who moved away leaving behind unpaid fines.

While it is too early to assess whether the city’s strong-arm strategy is working, the effort underscores its determination and financial desperation.

In the past, the city would sometimes allow legal judgments against scofflaws to languish too long unenforced, Mr. Frankel said. But with the total of parking fines owed the city climbing to $680 million since 2002, it was too large a pot of money to leave alone.

Mr. Frankel "was hired to make this agency as efficient as possible and collect the revenue that is owed,” a spokesman, Owen Stone, said.

About $440 million is outstanding in judgments for parking tickets, including the $209 million sent to collection agencies several weeks ago. The city is also seeking judgments against as much as $240 million more in overdue fines that date to 2002. Under the statute of limitations, fines are enforceable for eight years.

Most of the major scofflaws are commercial-truck leasing companies, some of which have gone out of business. But the city’s list of the top 10 ticket debtors also includes several individuals, led by Anthony Torres, a 41-year-old airport security worker who lives in Kingsbridge Heights, the Bronx, and who the city says owes $57,526 for parking illegally.

In an interview, Mr. Torres explained that the tickets were accumulated by a friend who had worked for him for several years, making deliveries using Mr. Torres’s van. The friend, he said, moved to the Dominican Republic. Mr. Torres said that the van was repossessed about two years ago and that while he had been trying to pay off the overdue parking fines, doing so was difficult because he made only $7.50 an hour.

"I learned my lesson: Don’t trust your friends,” Mr. Torres said. "Hopefully, things will turn around and I’ll be able to do the right thing and pay off my debt.”

The scofflaw list is led by AA Truck Renting in Long Island City, Queens, which owed $191,643 and is arranging with the city to pay off pending tickets incurred by its customers. The city can seize a commercial scofflaw’s assets, just as it can with an individual.

Paul Lanciotti, the company’s controller, said the double-parkers were not the company’s employees, but rather its customers. But Mr. Lanciotti acknowledged, "Ultimately we are responsible because we are the registered owner.”

The breakdown of vehicles registered to New York scofflaws who were ticketed in 2010, and against whom a judgment was entered as of Aug. 1, was led by passenger vehicles ($19,625,892), followed by commercial vehicles ($2,134,841), taxis ($949,065) and rented vehicles ($273,987).

The city can seek a judgment from an administrative law judge against an owner who fails to pay or to appeal a ticket after 90 days. The judgment, which can be enforced by city marshals and the city sheriff, empowers the city to garnishee wages or seize assets to satisfy the debt.

Of the $440 million in administrative law judgments already entered against scofflaws, $354 million is from vehicles with passenger plates, $34.5 million from those with commercial plates and $51.2 million from vehicles with a variety of special plates, including taxis, rental cars, voluntary ambulances and public officials. About $150 million of the $440 million is owed on vehicles with out-of-state license plates, more than half of which is owed by plate holders from New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut.

But the city is also owed $11 million from Florida vehicles, $9.3 million from North Carolina, $6.7 million from Massachusetts, $5 million from Virginia, $4.6 million from Georgia, $4.1 million from Maryland and $2.6 million from South Carolina.

Of the roughly 10 million tickets processed annually by the Finance Department, 5 percent — about 500,000 — are deemed not "processable,” meaning the owner or vehicle cannot be identified or found because the ticket was illegible, information was entered incorrectly or some other problem was involved.

Of the rest, about 60 percent are paid, 14 percent are dismissed after an owner presents evidence and 15 percent are reversed after an owner appeals a ticket that was not dismissed. In any given year, about 6 percent of fines are never paid.

"We’re going to do everything we can to find them,” Mr. Frankel, the finance commissioner, said.

The city’s forceful campaign against scofflaws is a combination of policy changes and computer databases that make debtors easier to find. "We are analyzing data, building models and reforming processes that in some cases have been in place for decades,” said Mr. Stone, the Finance Department spokesman.

Some states were charging the city $9 for a driver’s address, but the city is making greater use of collection agencies that can do the job — tracking down the scofflaw and demanding payment — for less. As a result, the city now has access to registration data from all 50 states, including those where pursuing vehicle owners seemed too expensive.

"For years, the tax collector was viewed as the horrible Sheriff of Nottingham,” Mr. Frankel said. "That’s not what we’re doing. We’re trying to protect people who are doing what they are supposed to do from a smaller group of people who say, ‘Come find us.’ ”




And yet these is no mention of the amount of money owed by the UN.
Styk_97  [Member]
10/29/2011 6:59:03 PM
It is so aggravating that they feel that they can not even look at the evidence and try and get you to just pay the ticket..
sterling18  [Team Member]
10/30/2011 10:42:07 PM
I hear there are some folks who can "fix" a ticket for you.
Extorris  [Team Member]
10/31/2011 3:44:28 AM
Originally Posted By sterling18:
I hear there are some folks who can "fix" a ticket for you.

Too late once it's been sent to PVB.
DefMan  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 4:35:42 PM
A little off topic but I would love to see the state go after every car and owner living in NYS with out of state plates. Get them for unpaid taxes. NJ, PA, NC are amomg the most I see in my area. Illegal converted apartments in the suburbs creates too much traffic and those who don't pay their share of living here. In Nassau, especially by me, many live here so they can walk to the bus stops which connects to NYC transit. Might help collect those BS MTA fees we're getting raped with.
mchad  [Team Member]
12/30/2011 12:04:23 AM
Just a quick update: I ended up going down to John St, to the appeals office. Clerk tells me that I can't appeal because the judgement was entered in April (even though I got a notice of *default* judgment in October, which means I never responded.. even though I did) and you have to appeal within 30 days. - I politely argue that their entire system is screwed up, showing my certified mail reciepts, copies of my proof, etc. She sympathizes, but still, wont let me see ann appeals judge. She does give me the name of a supervising admin judge, and suggests I write a letter explaining my appeal, and see what happens. I do. About a week and a half later I get a form back showing a successful appeal, and a dismissal. A day later I get a dismissal of the other ticket that was previously adjourned.

Needless to say I am happy with the ultimate outcome. Was a giant pain in my ass, but at least it's done now. A year later...

DefMan  [Team Member]
12/30/2011 12:12:20 AM
So basically, as Phil_A_Steen, you gotta keep after it. What a waste of your time it has been.
sterling18  [Team Member]
12/30/2011 10:17:50 AM

Originally Posted By mchad:
Just a quick update: I ended up going down to John St, to the appeals office. Clerk tells me that I can't appeal because the judgement was entered in April (even though I got a notice of *default* judgment in October, which means I never responded.. even though I did) and you have to appeal within 30 days. - I politely argue that their entire system is screwed up, showing my certified mail reciepts, copies of my proof, etc. She sympathizes, but still, wont let me see ann appeals judge. She does give me the name of a supervising admin judge, and suggests I write a letter explaining my appeal, and see what happens. I do. About a week and a half later I get a form back showing a successful appeal, and a dismissal. A day later I get a dismissal of the other ticket that was previously adjourned.

Needless to say I am happy with the ultimate outcome. Was a giant pain in my ass, but at least it's done now. A year later...

Nice work



mchad  [Team Member]
12/30/2011 10:21:43 AM
Thanks. Honestly, I was surprised. I didn't expect it to end here. And, I certainly didn't expect the judge to go and dismiss the other ticket as well. But hey, maybe I found one of the good guys in the system...

Happy new year, people.
sterling18  [Team Member]
12/30/2011 10:26:10 AM

Originally Posted By mchad:
Thanks. Honestly, I was surprised. I didn't expect it to end here. And, I certainly didn't expect the judge to go and dismiss the other ticket as well. But hey, maybe I found one of the good guys in the system...

Happy new year, people.

I think there are more than a few. I had a law professor that moonlighted as a Traffic Judge on Staten Island many years ago. He said most lawyers and law professors either donate their time or work for peanuts on the side and they are pretty reasonable.
mchad  [Team Member]
12/30/2011 10:34:18 AM
Very possible. That being the case, then I was very unlucky to have gotten two careless, bumbling idiots during my original defense...

:-)
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