AR15.Com Archives
 Is Amarillo a nice place to live?
CopDr  [Member]
2/3/2013 1:07:03 PM EST
Any of you have any firsthand knowledge of Amarillo? Nice place to raise a family? Any info would be great. Thanks!
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boarklr  [Team Member]
2/3/2013 1:16:20 PM EST
No, it literally smells like shit every other day and the surrounding area looks like a moderately recent nuclear test site. Yes, I've lived there.

To be fair, the prairie dogs are neat though.
wjoutlaw  [Team Member]
2/3/2013 1:18:59 PM EST
I second this opinion. I lived in Lubbock. It sucks as bad as Amarillo.
jnsey  [Team Member]
2/3/2013 1:30:34 PM EST
I lived there for 10 years and agree it does smell when the wind blows out of the SW (due to Randall Co Feed Yard) and yes it is VERY flat and the only trees are in town but its not that bad of a place to live. LOTS of restaurants and activities to do with your family. Palo Duro Canyon is south east of town and has good scenery and if your active you can ride mnt bikes or hike. Got any specific questions?
CopDr  [Member]
2/3/2013 3:35:53 PM EST
Thanks fellas! I'm considering moving and your info is helpful.
scottfire1957  [Team Member]
2/3/2013 7:28:51 PM EST
I've been here since 1979.

There are better places, and there are worse places.

Mostly flat farming/ranching land, but as stated Palo Duro canyon as well as the Canadian river basin add some variety. Tule canyon to the south also.

Also, it's not as flat as it looks, but it flat relatively.

Colorado and New Mexico mountains, Dallas/Ft.Worth are just 5-6 hours away. OKC and ABQ the same.

Culture? Some, but not a bunch. There are things to do if you like to explore.

I've worked, retired, am working again here since 1979, raised 2 kids.

It ain't bad, but that also depends on what you're used to.


We've no "suburbs," but we do have 4 Walmarts!

The Texas panhandle is windy. That one thing would be my main gripe.
buckmeister  [Member]
2/3/2013 7:39:05 PM EST
Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
The Texas panhandle is windy. That one thing would be my main gripe.


You forgot to mention the dust. Does the area have the same water issues facing West Texas? If so, I'd steer clear of the area.

buckmeister

CopDr  [Member]
2/4/2013 3:19:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By buckmeister:
Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
The Texas panhandle is windy. That one thing would be my main gripe.


You forgot to mention the dust. Does the area have the same water issues facing West Texas? If so, I'd steer clear of the area.

buckmeister



What water problem?
jnsey  [Team Member]
2/4/2013 4:20:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By CopDr:
Originally Posted By buckmeister:
Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
The Texas panhandle is windy. That one thing would be my main gripe.


You forgot to mention the dust. Does the area have the same water issues facing West Texas? If so, I'd steer clear of the area.

buckmeister



What water problem?


We have been in a decade long drought that has most of the lakes in the area below 20% capacity. They have had to switch to pumps and wells to supply the area water. It's a big deal but its also not if that makes sense. The aquifer below covers a vast area from Midland/Odessa all the way up to Canada so that water supply should last 100+ years. Sucks for our grand kids and great grand kids but hopefully by the time it REALLY turns into a problem we will have either got lots of rain or they figured a way to pump it up from places more plentiful.
CopDr  [Member]
2/4/2013 7:51:38 AM EST
Did not know this...thanks!
mlg123  [Team Member]
2/4/2013 9:30:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By buckmeister:
Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
The Texas panhandle is windy. That one thing would be my main gripe.


You forgot to mention the dust. Does the area have the same water issues facing West Texas? If so, I'd steer clear of the area.

buckmeister



And cold, don't leave out the freeking cold as hell north winds in December and January.

I've been to a lot of cold places but the occasional -26 degrees F with a 55 m/h north wind is about the coldest I have ever been in my entire life.

MLG
CopDr  [Member]
2/4/2013 1:17:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By mlg123:
Originally Posted By buckmeister:
Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
The Texas panhandle is windy. That one thing would be my main gripe.


You forgot to mention the dust. Does the area have the same water issues facing West Texas? If so, I'd steer clear of the area.

buckmeister



And cold, don't leave out the freeking cold as hell north winds in December and January.

I've been to a lot of cold places but the occasional -26 degrees F with a 55 m/h north wind is about the coldest I have ever been in my entire life.

MLG


Well this is my main concern I guess. I've had a spinal injury and the bitter cold winters in NW Ohio are killing me. I hoped that the arid climate in Texas would be better for my arthritis...now you have me concerned. I wish I knew someone who has artritic pain that could tell me if they notice a diffence in pain from this part of the country and near Amarillo. I say Amarillo because I could maybe transfer to the area or I would pick a place in Texas a little further south...still in Texas though. I love Texas
Thanks !

ex_dsmr  [Member]
2/4/2013 1:25:17 PM EST
Personally, I liked living there- there just wasnt much of a living to be made with my trade.
Re: the cold- sure, it may BE cold but with the arid climate its not bad. I used to go around in my shorts and a T shirt while it was 20* and not bat an eye.
I liked to froze to death when I came down to the metroplex to visit my parents when it was only 40. RH matters!

jnsey  [Team Member]
2/4/2013 2:43:49 PM EST
The cold sucks but being from where your at, I think you will feel like your moving to the tropics J/K. The -26 the above poster said is an exaggeration, the record low is only -16. In the 13 years I have lived in the panhandle the coldest it has got where I was that i can remember is -4 and that was in 2010. The average humidity is probably around 30% but there are times throughout the year where it will get down in the low single digits. Summertime is usually pretty hot but being so dry it's not as bad as say down by Houston where it's suffocating it seems like. This time of year it's nice, it's cool to cold in the mornings and the afternoons are t shirt weather with the occasional front combing through that drops the temps down 20 or so degrees. Springtime is sometimes weird, it will be nice in the morning, hot after lunch, a blue northern will roll in in the afternoon and drop the temps 50+ degrees and will snow that evening and night. You will no doubt see all 4 seasons in a 24 hr period.
buckmeister  [Member]
2/4/2013 6:27:30 PM EST
Originally Posted By jnsey:
We have been in a decade long drought that has most of the lakes in the area below 20% capacity. They have had to switch to pumps and wells to supply the area water. It's a big deal but its also not if that makes sense. The aquifer below covers a vast area from Midland/Odessa all the way up to Canada so that water supply should last 100+ years. Sucks for our grand kids and great grand kids but hopefully by the time it REALLY turns into a problem we will have either got lots of rain or they figured a way to pump it up from places more plentiful.


ALL of the West Texas water projects have fallen FLAT. Lake Thomas is at below 0.88%, and will NEVER be much more than a mud hole. Lake Spence is barely above 5%; its future mirrors that of Thomas. Ivie was supposed to be the ace in the hole. It was only 31% at its highest; it is down to 21%. Wells drilled north of Midland contain too much arsenic and fluoride to be safe and must be "blended" with other sources. Hoping that subsurface water will sustain the area is foolish at best. There is less than 20 year supply in the referenced aquifer at the current rate of growth. When it's gone...it's gone. Hoping for rain is as foolish; reference the decline of Lake Thomas.

Ever wonder why there are few, if any, trees? No rain!

Never mind waiting for disaster to fall on the grand-kids; It will suck for our kids, who are unfortunate to get stuck there.

buckmeister
jnsey  [Team Member]
2/4/2013 7:10:26 PM EST
Sorry I was referring to lakes and groundwater in the panhandle, not in the Permian basin. Amarillo use to get its water from Lake Meredith, now it comes from groundwater wells in the area between Pampa, Canadian, and Shamrock. Last estimates showed those wells at current flow would stay going for we'll over 100 years and even though it might be a little hard it's still good water. It's flowing good enought they still ship a big majority of it down to Lubbock and maybe even south of there. The only place I would worry about not having enought water in the near (read 20+ years) future is up around Dalhart and Texline. The town I live in has a lake close by that is currently supplying water to towns all the way down to almost Wichita Falls. That lake is going dry but our town just reopened 5 wells to supplement what we get from the lake to feed the other towns. I do agree thou, hoping for rain is foolish and we need to start working on some way to get water up here wether it be pumping from places of plenty or building desalination plant on the coast and laying lots and lots of pipe.
buckmeister  [Member]
2/4/2013 7:28:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By jnsey:
Sorry I was referring to lakes and groundwater in the panhandle, not in the Permian basin. Amarillo use to get its water from Lake Meredith, now it comes from groundwater wells in the area between Pampa, Canadian, and Shamrock. Last estimates showed those wells at current flow would stay going for we'll over 100 years and even though it might be a little hard it's still good water. It's flowing good enought they still ship a big majority of it down to Lubbock and maybe even south of there. The only place I would worry about not having enought water in the near (read 20+ years) future is up around Dalhart and Texline. The town I live in has a lake close by that is currently supplying water to towns all the way down to almost Wichita Falls. That lake is going dry but our town just reopened 5 wells to supplement what we get from the lake to feed the other towns. I do agree thou, hoping for rain is foolish and we need to start working on some way to get water up here wether it be pumping from places of plenty or building desalination plant on the coast and laying lots and lots of pipe.


The danger in using current usage is that it doesn't take into account even small growth rates. Just seven percent growth yields a population doubling in ten years. Five percent growth doubles the population in 14 years. Projections are worthless without accounting for the influx and plain old reproduction of the folks to and in the area. We can ill afford to hope that some future technology will save us. With the rising price of energy and its finite supply, getting water from distant places will be impossible... or at least prohibitively expensive.

Past planners have failed in their forecasts and subsequent plans. Towns built in the desert will become deserted, for lack of water. This could well happen in less than a generation.

All of this was known back in the 80's. Few listened. That trend continues.

buckmeister
USMC_7222  [Team Member]
2/4/2013 9:22:32 PM EST
As a semi recently new resident of Texas and I live about 45 min east of Amarillo. I LOVE it here. I moved from IL... it was flat, windy, HUMID and taxes were insane. Here the taxes are good, still flat, still windy, NO HUMIDITY and we have dust storms... but meh, I would rather live here than in IL that is for sure. In a few years I will have the opportunity to move down to the Hill Country with my job... I may take it, all depends on our situation at the time. Cost of living here is VERY reasonable. If you are willing to live in one of the smaller towns 30 min outside of Amarillo, you can get a hell of a nice house for 85-90k. We just bought a 2100 sq ft house built in the mid 60's that is nice condition for 80k.
ex_dsmr  [Member]
2/5/2013 5:26:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By jnsey:
Sorry I was referring to lakes and groundwater in the panhandle, not in the Permian basin. Amarillo use to get its water from Lake Meredith, now it comes from groundwater wells in the area between Pampa, Canadian, and Shamrock. Last estimates showed those wells at current flow would stay going for we'll over 100 years and even though it might be a little hard it's still good water. It's flowing good enought they still ship a big majority of it down to Lubbock and maybe even south of there. The only place I would worry about not having enought water in the near (read 20+ years) future is up around Dalhart and Texline. The town I live in has a lake close by that is currently supplying water to towns all the way down to almost Wichita Falls. That lake is going dry but our town just reopened 5 wells to supplement what we get from the lake to feed the other towns. I do agree thou, hoping for rain is foolish and we need to start working on some way to get water up here wether it be pumping from places of plenty or building desalination plant on the coast and laying lots and lots of pipe.


So is Meredith still dried up for the most part?
jnsey  [Team Member]
2/5/2013 6:39:07 AM EST
Originally Posted By ex_dsmr:
Originally Posted By jnsey:
Sorry I was referring to lakes and groundwater in the panhandle, not in the Permian basin. Amarillo use to get its water from Lake Meredith, now it comes from groundwater wells in the area between Pampa, Canadian, and Shamrock. Last estimates showed those wells at current flow would stay going for we'll over 100 years and even though it might be a little hard it's still good water. It's flowing good enought they still ship a big majority of it down to Lubbock and maybe even south of there. The only place I would worry about not having enought water in the near (read 20+ years) future is up around Dalhart and Texline. The town I live in has a lake close by that is currently supplying water to towns all the way down to almost Wichita Falls. That lake is going dry but our town just reopened 5 wells to supplement what we get from the lake to feed the other towns. I do agree thou, hoping for rain is foolish and we need to start working on some way to get water up here wether it be pumping from places of plenty or building desalination plant on the coast and laying lots and lots of pipe.


So is Meredith still dried up for the most part?


It's been a few months since I have seen it but I would assume yes. Last I heard it was basically the channel of the river running through it and that's about it. They tore down the marina and I don't even know if there is still a ramp to put a boat on it, although I don't know why you would want to risk that anyway.
CopDr  [Member]
2/5/2013 8:06:25 AM EST
Thanks guys! I don't know what to do. If I make the move Ill let you all know. I appreciate the info!
mlg123  [Team Member]
2/5/2013 9:33:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By jnsey:
The cold sucks but being from where your at, I think you will feel like your moving to the tropics J/K. The -26 the above poster said is an exaggeration, the record low is only -16. In the 13 years I have lived in the panhandle the coldest it has got where I was that i can remember is -4 and that was in 2010. The average humidity is probably around 30% but there are times throughout the year where it will get down in the low single digits. Summertime is usually pretty hot but being so dry it's not as bad as say down by Houston where it's suffocating it seems like. This time of year it's nice, it's cool to cold in the mornings and the afternoons are t shirt weather with the occasional front combing through that drops the temps down 20 or so degrees. Springtime is sometimes weird, it will be nice in the morning, hot after lunch, a blue northern will roll in in the afternoon and drop the temps 50+ degrees and will snow that evening and night. You will no doubt see all 4 seasons in a 24 hr period.


Not an exaggeration, Jan 2010, Fritch, Tx (about 40 miles north) my thermometer @ doorstep, -26 F. The "official" reading via the weather dude was not that low (-16 or so) but mine was that morning on the way to work.

It was the coldest I have ever been in my entire life.
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