AR15.Com Archives
 80% receivers in Canada?
DarthZeth  [Member]
9/22/2008 5:41:21 AM EST
Howdy,

In America a 80% finished receiver is not considered a firearm, so you can buy and sell them with out restrictions. You can then finish the receiver and build your own firearm with a minimum of hassle as long as it's for 'personal use'. Rules may vary depending on which state you are in.

Does Canada allow possession of 80% receivers as non-firearms? And does it have similar rules about building your own firearms?

Thanks
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nosce_te_ipsum  [Member]
9/22/2008 12:50:41 PM EST
The receiver is considered the firearm, regardless of percent complete. When I purchased my stripped receiver, it had to be registered as a restricted firearm and transferred into my name. I then bought the parts kit and stock, and assembled it. The upper was then purchased without having to register it. You are, however, then supposed to call and re-register it as a complete firearm when assembled.
DarthZeth  [Member]
9/22/2008 5:31:48 PM EST

Originally Posted By nosce_te_ipsum:
The receiver is considered the firearm, regardless of percent complete. When I purchased my stripped receiver, it had to be registered as a restricted firearm and transferred into my name. I then bought the parts kit and stock, and assembled it. The upper was then purchased without having to register it. You are, however, then supposed to call and re-register it as a complete firearm when assembled.


So how do they decide what is a sheet of metal and what's a receiver?

Or does it turn into a situation where you become a 'manufacturer' instead of a 'buyer' and are assailed by a ton of other regulations and fees? I guess that would make sense if Canada didn't have the "for personal use only" provision for building your own guns.
Lancair  [Team Member]
9/27/2008 11:37:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By DarthZeth:

Originally Posted By nosce_te_ipsum:
The receiver is considered the firearm, regardless of percent complete. When I purchased my stripped receiver, it had to be registered as a restricted firearm and transferred into my name. I then bought the parts kit and stock, and assembled it. The upper was then purchased without having to register it. You are, however, then supposed to call and re-register it as a complete firearm when assembled.


So how do they decide what is a sheet of metal and what's a receiver?

Or does it turn into a situation where you become a 'manufacturer' instead of a 'buyer' and are assailed by a ton of other regulations and fees? I guess that would make sense if Canada didn't have the "for personal use only" provision for building your own guns.


From another part of the commonwealth:

It is completely illegal for a private citizen to manufacture there own firearms. "Home-made" firearms are considered "prohibited firearms" - in the same class as machine guns.

While I can't speak for the canucks, I'd haphazard a guess that you wouldn't escape the attention of the Mounties selling 80% receivers or jigs.
nosce_te_ipsum  [Member]
9/28/2008 4:29:28 AM EST
I have heard of someone building their own firearm in Canuckistan, and I believe there is simply an onus to register it upon completion. This was a case of a one-off, for their own use and not for resale. Thus not a true "manufacturer" subject to licensing and scrutiny.

As to how do they determine at what point a piece of metal is a receiver, I am not sure. Was hoping someone with more knowledge than I would have chimed in. Certainly with a unique serial number stamped onto it, it meets the basic definition.
jeepingpw  [Member]
10/6/2008 12:47:23 PM EST
You can buy a 80% lower without it being registered.
Only when its 100% must it be then registered.

Dlask Arms in Delta , B.C. sells 80% lowers for $185.00, no registration required
nosce_te_ipsum  [Member]
10/7/2008 4:46:25 AM EST
But there is no "80% complete" law in Canada. It either is, or is not a receiver. If Dlask is selling incomplete receivers, from a Canadian perspective then these are not registered. I suspect this may be an attempt to sell into the US Market if they have such a law. But I am aware of no Canadian law about percentage complete, but please feel free to point out where I am wrong.
Westicle  [Team Member]
1/31/2009 1:25:29 AM EST
I have built an Ar15 from an 80% and it was not a problem..... had it verified and registered when the fire controls where done..... made sure everything was donefirst then drilled the last two holes so the trigger and stuff would work and done deal.

in canada the time to register is when it can fire, so if you do the buffer tube and everything else first incase you screw it up that is the best option..... hell you can even drill the triggerpin holes undersize so the pins will not fit just to locate them.....
TheCanuck  [Team Member]
1/31/2009 8:16:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By nosce_te_ipsum:
But there is no "80% complete" law in Canada. It either is, or is not a receiver. If Dlask is selling incomplete receivers, from a Canadian perspective then these are not registered. I suspect this may be an attempt to sell into the US Market if they have such a law. But I am aware of no Canadian law about percentage complete, but please feel free to point out where I am wrong.


I'm pretty sure there is. You're stripped lower was a 100% receiver because it had the various holes drilled out I believe.
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