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 Automatic knives legal or illegal in CT?
Danj  [Team Member]
4/12/2011 11:43:53 AM EST
Yes or no? What about spring assisted?
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glennfrank  [Member]
4/12/2011 11:48:15 AM EST
Assisted opening is ok. Switchblades are not.

Any knife that a spring is compressed and ready to push out at the push of a button is not legal.
Assisted opening knives are ok since when they are closed the spring actually helps keep it closed.
Danj  [Team Member]
4/12/2011 11:55:06 AM EST
Illegal to carry and sell?
Tyler259  [Team Member]
4/12/2011 1:13:46 PM EST
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206'' Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law


Danj  [Team Member]
4/12/2011 1:19:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By Tyler259:
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206'' Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law


I had a relative who was selling knives at a show in CT told by a CT state trooper on duty that if he sold them he would be arrested as they were illegal.

Remyrw  [Team Member]
4/12/2011 2:49:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By Danj:

Originally Posted By Tyler259:
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206''Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law


I had a relative who was selling knives at a show in CT told by a CT state trooper on duty that if he sold them he would be arrested as they were illegal.



Yeah, because the cops are so aware of the details of the law, we can just skip the rest of the justice system and let them handle it. In my experience, the police are no more aware of the law other than things they deal with every day than anyone else. They might be on the ball for the details of domestic abuse, traffic and such, but things they don't deal with every day? Not even close.
Danj  [Team Member]
4/12/2011 2:53:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By Remyrw:

Yeah, because the cops are so aware of the details of the law, we can just skip the rest of the justice system and let them handle it. In my experience, the police are no more aware of the law other than things they deal with every day than anyone else. They might be on the ball for the details of domestic abuse, traffic and such, but things they don't deal with every day? Not even close.
The fucked up part was this officer was apparently in charge of some illegal weapons unit of the CT state police. Other people at the show busted out the law and he wouldn't listen to them.

remlap61  [Member]
4/13/2011 12:40:16 AM EST
Switch blades aren't illegal you may carry one if you are hunting or fishing.
imtheflash  [Team Member]
4/13/2011 3:03:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By Tyler259:
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206'' Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law



I believe the knife blade can be under 4" in length


DanTSX  [Team Member]
4/13/2011 3:42:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By Danj:

Originally Posted By Remyrw:

Yeah, because the cops are so aware of the details of the law, we can just skip the rest of the justice system and let them handle it. In my experience, the police are no more aware of the law other than things they deal with every day than anyone else. They might be on the ball for the details of domestic abuse, traffic and such, but things they don't deal with every day? Not even close.
The fucked up part was this officer was apparently in charge of some illegal weapons unit of the CT state police. Other people at the show busted out the law and he wouldn't listen to them.


You are talking about knives on a gun board, but this should be noted in the minds of everyone here. Especially those of us rolling around with pre-bans. This is a great point, and we may very well find ourselves facing the same situation some day.

Remyrw  [Team Member]
4/13/2011 5:33:13 AM EST
Officers that refuse to be educated about the law and admit when they were incorrect need to be disciplined by their bosses very firmly. They do not get to make up the laws and they are expected to comply with them. they are in a position with a great deal of power and potential for abuse. The minute he had any reasonable cause to suspect his understanding was incorrect he should have either looked up the statute himself or called it in. Obviously if someone was showing the information to him they would have the numbers so he could have someone quickly look it up and provide him verification one way or the other.

His job is to enforce the law, not change it, ignore it, make it or argue about it. He doesn't get to force his personal opinions on the rest of the population when they run counter to the laws.
Remyrw  [Team Member]
4/13/2011 5:36:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By imtheflash:

Originally Posted By Tyler259:
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206''Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law



I believe the knife blade can be under 4" in length




The 4" length is for anything other than switchblades. It is ignored when active in a sporting activity such as hunting or fishing. It only applies to carrying them, so owning them is perfectly fine, just don't walk around in public. I'm not sure offhand whether the 1.5" limit for switchblades is flexible in the same way for people not already exempt from that limit.
BlindFaith429  [Member]
4/13/2011 6:25:17 AM EST
I was always under the impression that those restrictions were for carrying. I could be wrong though.

I always thought they were okay to have as a display piece / conversation piece, but just don't stick it in your pocket and go strolling down the street.

I could be way off though, so don't quote me.
Durham68  [Member]
4/13/2011 7:25:05 AM EST
I was told that there was a distiction made between "assisted opening" (where the blade is under spring pressure for part of the 180 degree arc) and automatics/switchblades (where the blade is under spring pressure for the entire 180 degrees). Kershaw speedsafe knives are sold all over CT.
JAD  [Member]
4/13/2011 11:02:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By imtheflash:

Originally Posted By Tyler259:
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206''Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law



I believe the knife blade can be under 4" in length




Carry legal for switchblades, for non-LEOs, is 1.5" BLADE LENGTH. Four inches, edged, is the standard for other knives.
Remyrw  [Team Member]
4/13/2011 11:07:15 AM EST
I'm not 100% sure on the legal definitions, but the way I understand the difference between a spring assist knife and a switchblade is how you open it. A switchblade is button operated, you press a button, blade pops out, you don't have to touch the blade yourself to open it. A spring assist requires you to manually move the blade at least part way to get it moving.

I THINK that is also the legal definition (roughly, I'm obviously not quoting here) but I'm not 100% sure. I make fixed blades and have made a couple folders but never got into the spring powered stuff. Heck, none of my commercially produced pocket knives are even spring assist these days.
JAD  [Member]
4/13/2011 11:10:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By Remyrw:
Originally Posted By imtheflash:

Originally Posted By Tyler259:
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206''Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law



I believe the knife blade can be under 4" in length




The 4" length is for anything other than switchblades. It is ignored when active in a sporting activity such as hunting or fishing. It only applies to carrying them, so owning them is perfectly fine, just don't walk around in public. I'm not sure offhand whether the 1.5" limit for switchblades is flexible in the same way for people not already exempt from that limit.


The sporting exemptions for non-switcblades are specified by statute, and have been since circa 1998. Before that, you either had to have a dangerous weapon permit valid in the town you were hunting in (and other towns you would be carrying the knife to/through),or hope that if caught the officer used his discretion. There is no-statutory exemption for sporting switchblade carry in CT, as there is in NYS.

In a way, the officer was actually helping people by instructing vendors not to sell the switchblades. There is really no legal way to bring them home, since there is no statutory exemption in 53-206 or 29-38 that covers transporting a dangerous weapon/ switchblade (or 4"+ knife) from the place of purchase to place of residence, and there is no 'licensed hunting/ fishing purposes" clause that could be extrapolated either. There is a gun/ knife show clause, but it is worded in a way that covers exhibitors but not customers, IIRC.
JAD  [Member]
4/13/2011 11:21:22 AM EST
Originally Posted By Remyrw:
I'm not 100% sure on the legal definitions, but the way I understand the difference between a spring assist knife and a switchblade is how you open it. A switchblade is button operated, you press a button, blade pops out, you don't have to touch the blade yourself to open it. A spring assist requires you to manually move the blade at least part way to get it moving.

I THINK that is also the legal definition (roughly, I'm obviously not quoting here) but I'm not 100% sure. I make fixed blades and have made a couple folders but never got into the spring powered stuff. Heck, none of my commercially produced pocket knives are even spring assist these days.


There is a ubiquitous gravity knife term in 53-206, which has only been the basis of charging a couply of people. The term is undefined by statute and has never been interpreted by an appeals court, to my knowledge. There was one case (involving a juvenile who was arrested at school for posessing a knife that could be opened by some sort of wrist action), and there was challenge made, but the appeals court refused to consider the claim because there hadn't been any attempt to question the knife's status as a gravity knife in any of the lower court preceedings). Unfortunately, the document was so vague that I have no clue if the knife was a real gravity knife (e.g. a NAZI paratrooper knife or repro), or a loose pocket knife of somesort or something else altogether, which the arresting officer articulated as a gravity knife. Some cheap and/or loose AOs will open very nicely with a wrist flick and sans any thumb/ finger action.
Blackhawk101  [Team Member]
4/13/2011 12:27:55 PM EST
Originally Posted By Remyrw:
Originally Posted By Danj:

Originally Posted By Tyler259:
<th>Connecticut</th>
Possession:Legal - State Code: Sec. 53-206''Carry:Legal - Allowed if blade is under 1.5 inches - State Code: Sec. 53-206

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switchblade#Federal_law


I had a relative who was selling knives at a show in CT told by a CT state trooper on duty that if he sold them he would be arrested as they were illegal.



Yeah, because the cops are so aware of the details of the law, we can just skip the rest of the justice system and let them handle it. In my experience, the police are no more aware of the law other than things they deal with every day than anyone else. They might be on the ball for the details of domestic abuse, traffic and such, but things they don't deal with every day? Not even close.


Dont even get me started on how I have to school the police on NFA laws to be told I dont know what I'm talking about. My retort tends to be "I would really know the laws before arresting someone who may end up living in what was your house"
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