AR15.Com Archives
 How you doing Youngstown?
RNO  [Team Member]
1/1/2012 11:23:54 AM EST
I see the area started the New Years celebration early with some Shake and Rattle - 4.0 Earthquake

Hope all is well. Any thoughts on it being associated to the Fracking style drilling for natural gas?
Paid Advertisement
--
cetmedog  [Member]
1/1/2012 11:33:09 AM EST
Kind of odd these quakes started happening and are located around the drilling sites. Now we have a hell of a wind storm going. Worst of all yesterday went to taco bell and they were out of taco meat just after the quake! That is the 7th sign we are done!
hdhogman  [Team Member]
1/1/2012 12:28:54 PM EST
Definitely felt that one, never knew a quake made a BOOM sound.
Sunday Vindicator had good info on cause.
Their is a 9000 foot deep well where they dispose of the chemical laden waste water.
It's all the way down to the bedrock\crust.
Above the bedrock\crust, is a layer of sandstone.
The water solution is trapped between both layers and acts as a lubricant, allowing the layers to shift and slide on each other.
My opinion is that the worst has yet to come.
11 since March?
Need Baghdad Bob to explain this one!
abizdafuzz  [Member]
1/2/2012 6:20:28 AM EST
My issue is with all the misinformation about drilling. 9,000 ft...that's not even a dent in the crust. The continental crust is between 20 miles(105,600 ft) to 30 miles(158,400 ft) thick.

The drilling fluid is normally pumped back down hole of an existing well witch in turn refills the void left when the oil or gas was taken out. These wells are located or placed between solid rock caps that have held liquid for millions of years between them and are not likely to start changing anytime soon.

Oil is less viscous than drilling fluid aka more slippery and natural gas is well that, a compressible gas that does not bode well for load bearing or holding its shape either.

And, the Eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania ares have been drilled for over 100 years ranging from 10 foot to 10,000 foot depths without issue, so why would things be different or special now? Heck, they have always used explosives down hole to fracture the formations and none of those caused these issues either??

The Earth changes every day and there's nothing we can do about it.
armoredsaint  [Team Member]
1/2/2012 6:34:12 AM EST

Originally Posted By abizdafuzz:
My issue is with all the misinformation about drilling. 9,000 ft...that's not even a dent in the crust. The continental crust is between 20 miles(105,600 ft) to 30 miles(158,400 ft) thick.

The drilling fluid is normally pumped back down hole of an existing well witch in turn refills the void left when the oil or gas was taken out. These wells are located or placed between solid rock caps that have held liquid for millions of years between them and are not likely to start changing anytime soon.

Oil is less viscous than drilling fluid aka more slippery and natural gas is well that, a compressible gas that does not bode well for load bearing or holding its shape either.

And, the Eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania ares have been drilled for over 100 years ranging from 10 foot to 10,000 foot depths without issue, so why would things be different or special now? Heck, they have always used explosives down hole to fracture the formations and none of those caused these issues either??

The Earth changes every day and there's nothing we can do about it.

Facts are not allowed here

eta: +1, well said.
abizdafuzz  [Member]
1/2/2012 7:15:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By armoredsaint:

Facts are not allowed here

eta: +1, well said.


Touche...I forgot that part. My bad if the truth hurts, or I popped a bubble or two
RNO  [Team Member]
1/2/2012 7:29:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By abizdafuzz:
My issue is with all the misinformation about drilling. 9,000 ft...that's not even a dent in the crust. The continental crust is between 20 miles(105,600 ft) to 30 miles(158,400 ft) thick.

The drilling fluid is normally pumped back down hole of an existing well witch in turn refills the void left when the oil or gas was taken out. These wells are located or placed between solid rock caps that have held liquid for millions of years between them and are not likely to start changing anytime soon.

Oil is less viscous than drilling fluid aka more slippery and natural gas is well that, a compressible gas that does not bode well for load bearing or holding its shape either.

And, the Eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania ares have been drilled for over 100 years ranging from 10 foot to 10,000 foot depths without issue, so why would things be different or special now? Heck, they have always used explosives down hole to fracture the formations and none of those caused these issues either??

The Earth changes every day and there's nothing we can do about it.


I agree with you. There is a suggested association about it in the video I linked.
Seismic activity is more common along Lake Erie per the OhioSeis web site. It also clearly shows zero activity south where I believe the same type of drilling has increased. Ohio Fracking Map



abizdafuzz  [Member]
1/2/2012 8:19:26 AM EST
Yea, I'm not going to say it absolutely for sure didn't have anything to do with it.

But, there needs to be some serious hard proof that an earthquake that took place on an active fault line; in a state that has at least 7 faults; and near the base hills leading into one of this country's oldest mountain ranges (the Appalachians) was caused by someone pumping a few thousand gallons of mud into a fairly shallow hole near by...

Waste water and fluid solids are also pumped into holding areas at lower pressures than hydraulic fracking witch only are at a few thousand psi anyway. Most bed rock has compressive strengths in the 10's of thousands of psi.

Just because the very liberal EPA says one thing, does not mean its true or even remotely close to right given their track record on oil and gas. Some how, show real proof with hard facts for once and things might be more reasonable or believable.
Paid Advertisement
--