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 so... im thinking of joining the Ohio Guard, "OMR"
OhioLongRange  [Member]
11/23/2011 7:11:19 AM EST
any reason i shouldnt?... other then the gay "shiny black combat boots"... seriously?.. the army did away with this for a reason...

looks like you have to buy all you own gear... anyone know what that might total up to?
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Tim_the_enchanter  [Team Member]
11/23/2011 9:51:21 AM EST
They used to be made of of mostly MP type units. IIRC, they are now civil affairs. Handing out water and MRE's type stuff. I'm not sure which would be worse: joining as prior service and expecting something like military, or joining with no prior service and believing it's something like military.
swingset  [Team Member]
11/23/2011 9:58:02 AM EST
The Salvation Army is probably more military than the OMR.
OhioLongRange  [Member]
11/23/2011 10:04:23 AM EST

Originally Posted By swingset:
The Salvation Army is probably more military than the OMR.

ya... the are a support role now, kinda boring...
but still part of the NG and looks good on a resume as you can now check the box that says .mil
TUBBY  [Team Member]
11/23/2011 1:57:21 PM EST
Originally Posted By OhioLongRange:
any reason i shouldnt?... other then the gay "shiny black combat boots"... seriously?.. the army did away with this for a reason...

looks like you have to buy all you own gear... anyone know what that might total up to?



Hey there hero. It takes skill to get a proper spit shine on GI boots. The new ones you could shine with a "candy bar"

Thug_Hunter12  [Member]
11/23/2011 3:33:47 PM EST
Originally Posted By OhioLongRange:
...looks good on a resume as you can now check the box that says .mil

I really hope that was a joke.
OhioLongRange  [Member]
11/23/2011 7:20:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Thug_Hunter12:
Originally Posted By OhioLongRange:
...looks good on a resume as you can now check the box that says .mil

I really hope that was a joke.

why? they are under the ohio NG.. they are authorized to have NG ohio plates on there cars, and access to most of the same benefits..

not to mention that "looks good on a resume as you can now check the box that says .mil" is a direct quote from the OMR recruiter...
Chuck  [Team Member]
11/24/2011 4:13:04 AM EST
As an HR executive, combat veteran and retired Army officer I'd laugh you out of my office it you claimed Ohio Military Reserve as "military."

Their original purpose is to replace the Ohio Army National Guard when the entire OHARNG has been federalized. They're technically state "military" forces when called to state active duty but there is no military training conducted nor military mission. TAG Ohio commands these forces. License plates aside they're not Army National Guard –– ask any Guardsman!

Don't misunderstand me. OMR members seem to be serious about (whatever) they do, but any pretense or claim of being "military" is delusional at best.

–– Chuck
DonOhio39  [Team Member]
11/26/2011 5:57:53 PM EST
We always called these guys the "Cornstalk Militia" and thought of them primarily as jokes. This was in the '80s and '90s, no idea what the sentiment in the Guard is now days.

Don in Ohio
Dragracer_Rob  [Team Member]
11/27/2011 10:45:00 PM EST
I'll throw my .02 in the mix. I was actually in the OHMR.
Is it military? You stand up, raise your right hand and swear the same oath as the "regular" military folks. (Swear to defend the constitution... enemies, foreign and domestic)We also fall under the UCMJ.
You go through their version of basic training which is mostly about learning military customs, learning how to march, learning your standing orders, making a bunk, packing a footlocker, paying attention to detail. The age range for people joining is from 17 to 69. In my class there was a 17 yr old high school senior, a retired college professor, an attorney, a small business owner....many different walks of life. Prior service doesn't have to go through basic.
Drill is two days (one required) every month.
There is a one week a year summer camp at Camp Perry ( you can visit the CMP store ) where a variety of skills are taught, usually ending with some sort of mock disaster drill where the unit's performance is evaluated.
Who are you going to find serving? Lot of prior service guys, LE, some guys with bad ears or something else that kept them from the "real" service, many who for a variety of reasons never served but felt like they should. There is a medical corps, a jag corps, all arranged following the Army model. I was S4 for my unit and we had the same endless paperwork as the Army.
I was in during the transition time between what they were MP's, and what they are today, which is more support functions for disasters and shelter management.

The down side -
No guns. Back in the day we qualified with rifle, pistol, and shotguns. Had baton training, learned to do searches and handcuff folks. No more.
It was definitely an low speed, high drag group.(They have tightened up the physical requirements since I left). I screwed up once at basic and the black hat told me to drop and give him two. I was a bit insulted. I could have done twice that many There is an annual PFT (run, push ups, and sit ups), as well as a weight / tape requirement. I think we were using standard Army tables.
You have to learn to polish and wear those shiny ass black boots.
You have to buy your own gear, your own gas to get to drill, your own food for drill and FTX's...
You have to tolerate folks in the "real" military who get their tighty whitey's in a bundle because they think your voluntary (NO PAY) contribution to the state is unimportant. I guess because you won't get shot at or deployed outside of the state, you can't be called a soldier. Probably the same type of bias the regular Army has (had) for the weekend warriors in the Reserve. Those attitudes are thankfully not very prevalent, I used to have vets thanking me for my service.
They still seem to be sorting out the mission and how to deploy them in the Emergency Services mix. Like a peace time military, lots of training but no real deployments to date.

I left when my job had me outside the country more than inside, but was proud to wear the uniform when I was in.
Finally, to all those who stand in harms way in the "real" military and those who volunteer their time to serve the state. Thank You for your service.

Rob
Thug_Hunter12  [Member]
11/28/2011 2:05:20 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Rob:We also fall under the UCMJ.


Can a serious violation of the UCMJ land a member of the OHMR in a military prison like Leavenworth?
Dragracer_Rob  [Team Member]
11/28/2011 8:21:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By Thug_Hunter12:
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Rob:We also fall under the UCMJ.


Can a serious violation of the UCMJ land a member of the OHMR in a military prison like Leavenworth?


Would guess so. If we get deployed we get treated like the other branches of the military. Given the mission, I think it would be difficult to be placed in a position where something that serious could happen. Pulled this from elsewhere.

The Ohio Military Reserve is military under federal law (US Code 32, Section 109) and Ohio state law. Pentagon and National Guard Bureau documents reflect the military status of State Defense Forces. The Ohio Military Reserve oath is to the United States Constitution and to the Ohio Constitution. The Ohio Revised Code allows for the President to request the service of the Ohio Military Reserve. Go read the Ohio Revised Code 5920 and 5923.
ORC 5920

The Oath I took

Tim_the_enchanter  [Team Member]
11/28/2011 9:16:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Rob:

If we get deployed we get treated like the other branches of the military.


What do you mean by "deployed"?

Dragracer_Rob  [Team Member]
11/28/2011 9:32:53 AM EST
Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Rob:

If we get deployed we get treated like the other branches of the military.


What do you mean by "deployed"?



The Governor calls up your unit to help with say a flood, tornado, or some other event. Same as a National Guard unit gets called in for the same type of events. If your unit is deployed, you get paid the same as the National Guard units. Pay is equivalent the theirs and based on your rank. And just like the Guard, your employer must let you off of work to go to drill and summer camp.
Chuck  [Team Member]
11/29/2011 2:22:05 AM EST
OMR has no status under any title of the US Code, it's a pure state force. Sections 5920.01 to 5920.11 of the Revised Code do not authorize the Ohio military reserve, or any part thereof, to be called or ordered as such into the military service of the United States (as they would be if under Title 32).

Don't confuse the OMR with the Ohio National Guard which has dual state and federal status under Title 32 and Title 10 depending on the situation. OMR units to not meet the requirements for Federal Recognition under US Title 32, nor do their officers hold federal commissions (as do ARNG and ANG officers). The fact that OHARNG and OMR both work for TAGOH does not change ORM's status.

–– Chuck
TheDuck  [Team Member]
11/29/2011 3:21:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By OhioLongRange:

looks good on a resume as you can now check the box that says .mil


If you want to check that box then join the military, simple as that. While they may do some good in times of need, its not the same. That's as bad as those guys out there that get a commission on some little podunk department that never actually do their time but walk around wearing the badge claiming to be LEO's. Submit your resume to a company doing a DoD or DoS contract overseas that requires military and see how far that checked little box gets you.

Dragracer_Rob  [Team Member]
11/29/2011 7:55:55 AM EST
Originally Posted By Chuck:
OMR has no status under any title of the US Code, it's a pure state force. Sections 5920.01 to 5920.11 of the Revised Code do not authorize the Ohio military reserve, or any part thereof, to be called or ordered as such into the military service of the United States (as they would be if under Title 32).

Don't confuse the OMR with the Ohio National Guard which has dual state and federal status under Title 32 and Title 10 depending on the situation. OMR units to not meet the requirements for Federal Recognition under US Title 32, nor do their officers hold federal commissions (as do ARNG and ANG officers). The fact that OHARNG and OMR both work for TAGOH does not change ORM's status.

–– Chuck


Agree with everything you said. Is the question really that military service for the state government doesn't count as military service?
Tim_the_enchanter  [Team Member]
11/29/2011 2:37:51 PM EST
Edit
mean_sartin  [Team Member]
12/1/2011 11:51:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Rob:
Originally Posted By Chuck:
OMR has no status under any title of the US Code, it's a pure state force. Sections 5920.01 to 5920.11 of the Revised Code do not authorize the Ohio military reserve, or any part thereof, to be called or ordered as such into the military service of the United States (as they would be if under Title 32).

Don't confuse the OMR with the Ohio National Guard which has dual state and federal status under Title 32 and Title 10 depending on the situation. OMR units to not meet the requirements for Federal Recognition under US Title 32, nor do their officers hold federal commissions (as do ARNG and ANG officers). The fact that OHARNG and OMR both work for TAGOH does not change ORM's status.

–– Chuck


Agree with everything you said. Is the question really that military service for the state government doesn't count as military service?


It's state service, not Federal service.

Chuck  [Team Member]
12/1/2011 1:39:45 PM EST
An unarmed albeit uniformed "service" hardly counts as Military any more than JROTC. The word military in their title notwithstanding.

The ID cards of ARNG members is headed "Armed Forces of the United States" right across the top. Now I'm curious what is on the OMR ID.

–– Chuck
OhioLongRange  [Member]
12/2/2011 1:55:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By Chuck:
An unarmed albeit uniformed "service" hardly counts as Military any more than JROTC. The word military in their title notwithstanding.

The ID cards of ARNG members is headed "Armed Forces of the United States" right across the top. Now I'm curious what is on the OMR ID.

–– Chuck

http://www.scribd.com/doc/37264241/Ohio-Military-Reserve-Identification-Cards-OHMR-Forms-2-2A-Regulation-640-3

last page
Chuck  [Team Member]
12/2/2011 1:18:06 PM EST
Thanks. OMR knows they're not military.

"State of Ohio Uniformed Services" is quite different from "Armed Forces of the United States".

–– Chuck

Dragracer_Rob  [Team Member]
12/2/2011 2:57:56 PM EST
Chuck, we'll just have to agree to disagree. Your operational definition of military service and mine are different. As an HR professional, you should know that you have to treat your employees that are in the OHMR the same way as a National Guard troop regarding time off to go to drill and summer camp...even though they are not military.

To the OP. You don't want to join just to check that box. If you feel like you want to serve the people of the state, go for it.
akuser-47  [Member]
12/2/2011 6:28:32 PM EST
why not be a private contractor and get paid. seems our gov. supports and uses them and you will earn more doing that than regular enlistment. Prior mil. exp. helps in this game.
Tim_the_enchanter  [Team Member]
12/2/2011 6:51:16 PM EST
Chuck isn't alone in his opinion. The OMR does have an important mission. They are organized volunteers ready to serve when needed. I have no problem with the OMR as long as they do not make believe they are something more than what they are. It seems that many members have a Walter Mitty syndrome.
Chuck  [Team Member]
12/3/2011 3:18:37 AM EST
Please note I do not degrade OMR service. Just like I don't degrade service in your local CERT team.

Any attempt to equate either with "military service," however, is delusional. And rather insulting to those of us who have military service.

By the way, my ID card no longer reads "Armed Forces of the United States." Since my Army retirement it reads "Uniformed Services of the United States."

–– Chuck

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