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 Thought on this barrel burn rate chart?
Bhart89  [Team Member]
5/29/2013 6:15:47 AM EST
Anyone have any feedback either supporting or in contrast to this barrel burn rate chart?

I was thinking that the 6.5 (.260 Remington) would have a better barrel life than 2250 rounds using 4350 powder. Same with the .338 Lapua using h1000 powder

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ColtMatch556  [Member]
5/29/2013 6:24:40 AM EST
there are way to many veriables that affect barrel life to rely on a chart.

Powder choice is only one of the veriables.
Rob01  [Moderator]
5/29/2013 8:15:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By ColtMatch556:
there are way to many veriables that affect barrel life to rely on a chart.

Powder choice is only one of the veriables.



BINGO! That chart is for people who need a chart to tell them everything. There is no way to chart barrel life with powders. Way too many variables from barrel steel to rate of fire.
taliv  [Member]
5/29/2013 8:53:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By Rob01:
Originally Posted By ColtMatch556:
there are way to many veriables that affect barrel life to rely on a chart.

Powder choice is only one of the veriables.



BINGO! That chart is for people who need a chart to tell them everything. There is no way to chart barrel life with powders. Way too many variables from barrel steel to rate of fire.


true, but if this chart were accurate with all those other variables held constant, it would still be informative.


to make it useful, you would have to list those other variable so you could hold them constant. aside from rate of fire, the other big issue is defining when a barrel is end of life. presumably you're basing this on some accuracy standard or velocity slowing down to some threshold
Green_Canoe  [Member]
5/29/2013 9:07:22 AM EST
There is a spread sheet program at Accurate Shooter That might get you a little closer to something useful.
Green_Canoe  [Member]
5/29/2013 9:10:44 AM EST
Part of the key to this chart is the statement: "If the cartridge is loaded to similar ballistic potential the barrel life will be similar."

You can't load a rifle cartridge to the same balistic potential using Unique vs. 4831SC.
Rob01  [Moderator]
5/29/2013 10:13:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By taliv:

true, but if this chart were accurate with all those other variables held constant, it would still be informative.




Yeah and IF my aunt had a dick she would be my uncle LOL If it did what you said it would only be good for that barrel for that person shooting it and once the barrel was gone then another barrel was screwed on then it's not worth anything again due to different barrel steel and the other variables a simple chart doesn't take into account for.

Anyone who wants to use the chart have fun but I wouldn't put any stock in it at all.
Bhart89  [Team Member]
5/29/2013 10:33:22 AM EST
Is this chart useful for someone contemplating the ROI at getting into reloading? Or are the numbers orders of magnitude off?
Green_Canoe  [Member]
5/29/2013 10:58:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By Bhart89:
Is this chart useful for someone contemplating the ROI at getting into reloading? Or are the numbers orders of magnitude off?


The chart is useful if you take into acount the disclaimer in small print. If you are loading a .308 for typical performance levels you don't use 4831SC or H1000 but you do load it with 4064. Likewise you if you are loading a .300 Win Mag for typical performance you don't use 4064 but rather use 4831SC or H1000. The numbers the chart gives for those powders agree with the generally accepted barrel life numbers for those cartridges. So from that standpoint the chart can be useful. But don't think you are going to use 3031 in a .300 Win Mag. and get 5000+ rounds of barrel life. Sure you'll get the barrel life, but you will only be getting 2500 FPS or so from your .300 Win Mag. What's the point of that?

I'm not sure how ROI for reloading relates to barrel life. It does figure into cost per shot but that really has nothing to do with the ROI on reloading equipment to my way of thinking. My reloading equipment ROI is solely based on cost of reloaded ammo vs. cost of comparable factory load. I'm going to shoot out the barrel no matter what, be it with factory ammo or reloaded ammo. The cost of barrel life is constant no matter the source of barrel wear.
Bhart89  [Team Member]
5/29/2013 11:15:55 AM EST
Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:
Originally Posted By Bhart89:
Is this chart useful for someone contemplating the ROI at getting into reloading? Or are the numbers orders of magnitude off?


The chart is useful if you take into acount the disclaimer in small print. If you are loading a .308 for typical performance levels you don't use 4831SC or H1000 but you do load it with 4064. Likewise you if you are loading a .300 Win Mag for typical performance you don't use 4064 but rather use 4831SC or H1000. The numbers the chart gives for those powders agree with the generally accepted barrel life numbers for those cartridges. So from that standpoint the chart can be useful. But don't think you are going to use 3031 in a .300 Win Mag. and get 5000+ rounds of barrel life. Sure you'll get the barrel life, but you will only be getting 2500 FPS or so from your .300 Win Mag. What's the point of that?

I'm not sure how ROI for reloading relates to barrel life. It does figure into cost per shot but that really has nothing to do with the ROI on reloading equipment to my way of thinking. My reloading equipment ROI is solely based on cost of reloaded ammo vs. cost of comparable factory load. I'm going to shoot out the barrel no matter what, be it with factory ammo or reloaded ammo. The cost of barrel life is constant no matter the source of barrel wear.


If you reload at half the cost of factory ammo you'll burn your barrel out 2x as fast.
ChrisGarrett  [Member]
5/29/2013 12:49:13 PM EST
I've read of a formula that can 'predict' throat erosion fairly well...maybe on 6mmBR.com, in their archives. Something like bullet caliber in square millimeters divided by powder capacity in grains. Essentially, smaller calibers on top of larger powder charges, yields more T.E..

ETA:

http://www.accurateshooter.com/technical-articles/excel-formula-predicts-useful-barrel-life/

Chris
taliv  [Member]
5/29/2013 1:20:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By Rob01:
Originally Posted By taliv:

true, but if this chart were accurate with all those other variables held constant, it would still be informative.




Yeah and IF my aunt had a dick she would be my uncle LOL If it did what you said it would only be good for that barrel for that person shooting it and once the barrel was gone then another barrel was screwed on then it's not worth anything again due to different barrel steel and the other variables a simple chart doesn't take into account for.

Anyone who wants to use the chart have fun but I wouldn't put any stock in it at all.


no need to bring your family into this LOL. When trying to learn, and optimize or solve complex problems, from weather to genetics to ballistics, the best approach is isolating variables. So of course it's only good for one thing. That's the point of holding everything else constant.. If someone put the work into it to isolate each one and measure it, then eventually we would be able to put all the variables back together and predict the barrel life as accurately as we can predict the flight of the bullet, which is just as difficult a problem, with probably more variables at play.


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