AR15.Com Archives
 Remington 700 SPS Tactical vs 700 SPS Varmint?
jray05stang  [Member]
11/11/2008 1:40:31 AM
Hi all,
I am new to the world of precision shooting but have been to the range many times with friends who are well schooled. I am in the market for a Remington 700 in either the SPS Tactical or the SPS Varmint... I know the difference of the 2 guns specs wise but do not understand the highs and low points of owning either one. I mainly will target shoot anywhere between 300 and 600 and will do some white tail hunting with the weapon. I was also looking into the new VTR but the gun is just not proven yet and cannot see spending the extra money on it. ANY info would be so greatly appreciated! Thanks Guys!
RoughOperator  [Member]
11/11/2008 2:23:27 AM
Since the tactical has a free floating, shorter barrel, it will be a bit more accurate and easier to handle in the field, but over long ranges, the loss of velocity from the shorter barrel might come into play. IMO the SPS tactical's stock is better. If I remember correctly, you'd have to find a Remington certified dealer or order one online if you chose to get the tactical.

Someone come in and talk up the varmint so he has a tough time choosing.
jray05stang  [Member]
11/11/2008 2:26:24 AM
I also will be mounting a Nikon Buckmaster 6-18x40 mil dot reticle on the gun I hear nothing but good things about it for the money...

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=123107&t=11082005

Midway has them on sale for 299.95 until November 30th which is a really good deal!
jray05stang  [Member]
11/11/2008 2:28:49 AM
I already have an extremely tough time choosing! I wanna lean towards the tactical because I already have a dealer who stocks them and can get me 1 for a good price! One day I would like to shoot longer ranges but there are no ranges past 600 anywhere near me... Is the tactical really free floated? I thought there were problems with the stock being to flimsy causing the barrel to not be truly free floated??
jray05stang  [Member]
11/11/2008 2:30:42 AM
O and stupid me... I will be getting the gun chambered in .308... cant forget that very important bit...
beenaround  [Team Member]
11/11/2008 8:03:20 AM
I think the Tactical is a more solid piece in general- but that is just personal opinion. I had the .223 with a Houge stock and that is what I had an issue with when it came to the free float. The .308 I got came with the "middle class" stock, its a bit cheaper then the wood version but its been decent to me.
unclemoak  [Team Member]
11/11/2008 8:32:37 AM
I don't think it was mentioned, so I will add that the SPS Varmint is essentially a 700 Police with a crappy stock. So if you are planning on upgrade in the near future anyway, it might be a more viable option.
SigOwner_P229  [Team Member]
11/11/2008 1:29:09 PM
Basically the only difference is the stock and barrel length. The stocks don't matter, they both stink, but a person could get by with either if they can't afford to upgrade. The barrel length is a matter of personal preference. You won't be able to see a difference in accuracy between the barrel lengths and the shorter barrel will not lose a significant amount of velocity. So that leaves weight as an important factor; do you want a rifle that is a little heavier (Varmint) or a little lighter (Tactical)? IMHO, if you have a dealer that has a tactical in stock, get it, you won't be disappointed.
jray05stang  [Member]
11/11/2008 5:04:02 PM
I defiantly like the lighter aspect of the tactical because it will be used for some hunting in the Midwest which will require quite a bit of walking and carrying the gun. The velocity was the primary thing I was worried about. I just have no idea how much velocity you would actually lose when it comes to longer distance shooting.

I cant exactly remember which stock the tactical I looked at had... I wanna say it was more like the Varmint stock... I guess I will have to look closer when I get home for Thanksgiving break.
unclemoak  [Team Member]
11/11/2008 6:33:51 PM
I'm pretty sure the Tactical comes from the factory in a Hogue overmolded.


A writeup from Sniper Central.



Caliber: .223 Rem (5.56x45mm NATO)
.308 Win (7.62x51mm NATO)
Barrel: Carbon Steel
Barrel Length: 20" (508mm)
Twist: RH 1:12" (.308)
Empty Weight (no optics): 7.5 lbs (3.40 kg)
Overall Length: 40.0" (1.016m)
Magazine: 4 round internal box
Trigger: Remington X-Mark Pro™, adjustable for weight
Stock: Hogue Overmolded with Aluminum Pillars
Finish: Matte Bluing
Price: ~$550

We recently performed a review on the Remington 700 SPS-Varmint to test the suitability of that rifle as a tactical rifle, but this time around we will be testing the Remington 700 SPS Tactical rifle to see how well it performs. The SPS Tactical is only available through Remington premium dealers, but in reality they should be fairly easy to find. These rifles are specifically labeled and marketed as a tactical rifle and as such we will be evaluating it as a tactical rifle and not a varmint rifle filling a tactical rifle role. We ordered a rifle from our supplier and prepared for the evaluation.




The 700 SPS Tactical is setup to be a compact tactical rifle that is easy to transport and usable in any weather condition. To achieve this at a reasonable price, a SPS trademark, Remington used a shortened varmint barrel (20") and an off the shelf Hogue Over-molded stock. These stocks have been around for a while and are fairly popular with shooters. The design is fairly typical for a rifle stock with a flatter type forend that remains fairly wide to provide a stable shooting platform off of sandbags or other shooting rests. I would prefer a pistol grip that had a bit more girth to it and was a bit more vertical, but it works okay as is.




The thing that sets the Hogue stock apart is the soft rubber compound that the exterior is made of. It provides and excellent gripping surface in all weather conditions and is warm to the touch. Another interesting point about it is that it is very quite if you bang it against something. While the audible quietness is perhaps not a major factor to consider, it is still a benefit. The rubber is molded over a ribbed plastic frame like many injection molded stocks, and like those stocks, this stock is not as stiff as I would like a stock to be. In fact, while using a bipod, the forend flexes enough to touch the barrel slightly. While it did not seem to affect the accuracy of this particular rifle, it is still a precision rifle no-no that should be avoided. This stock has the two aluminum pillars which work well enough for an economy rifle like this, obviously glass or aluminum bedding would be preferred, but that would raise the price considerably. The forend also only has a single stud without a specific 2nd stud dedicated for a bipod, making another minor inconvience.



The Barrel is free floating (until you use a bipod or a sandbag way up front on the forend) and is 20" in length. It is the standard Remington heavy barrel contour and does have a nice 11 degree target crown. The barrel channel gap on this example was nice and even the whole length, again, unless using it off a bipod causing it to touch at the very end. The action is a typical Remington 700 SPS action with the fairly rough matte finish over the entire barreled action. Unfortunately the SPS Tactical comes with the new Remington X Mark Pro trigger which I am not a big fan of, though I will admit it had a fairly clean 4 pound break. I just do not like the trigger shoe itself, the color, or the adjustment of it... perhaps I'm just a traditionalist. The trigger was kept at its factory setting for all testing here.

Even taking the flaws into consideration, the overall package is not bad for the money. The 20" barrel is just about right and the rifle balances well and is fairly light and easy to carry in the field. For the money it appears to be a solid package though obviously not perfect, but we still needed to check the performance before making any final conclusions.

The Remington 700P LTR with its fluted 20" barrel has a reputation of being the most accurate of the mass produced tactical rifles that Remington makes and many people believe that the 18-20" barrel lengths are ideal for the best accuracy with a .308, though you do give up some velocity. With the trigger left breaking at 4 lbs we expected some decent performance, though the stock sometimes touching the barrel did concern us. We used a Swift 6-18x scope for this evaluation and the groups were fired at 100 yards on about 16x. We used some cheaper 150gr 308 range ammo for the initial sight in, and things were not looking good with groups about 3". But then we changed to federal gold medal match 168gr ammo, things got better... MUCH better.

Here is a picture of three consecutive groups fired with the gold medal match ammo.




Now, they were not ALL that good primarily because of shooter error, but when you do three in a row like that, it is a pretty good indication of accuracy. All groups were fired at 100 yards using a sandbag upfront and sandsock at the rear. The three groups above measured .381", .362" and .313" respectively. The overall average for all groups fired with Federal GMM was .466". So, this particular rifle, even with the front of the rubber stock touching the barrel slightly, is clearly sub .5 MOA rifle out of the box. That is quite impressive for a $550 lower end tactical rifle. We did not try any of the other match grade ammunition, but it certainly likes the Federal. The trigger on this one didn't perform too bad at the range, though the recoil, as should be expected with the lighter weight and shorter barrel, was more brisk with more pronounced muzzleflip than a typical 700P or other longer and heavier .308 tactical rifles.

As is not totally uncommon with Remington rifles, the mounting holes were a bit off center and it took a decent amount of left scope adjustments to zero. There was still enough for wind situations, but it is still a sign of a bit of sloppy manufacturing.

In conclusion, it may be wise to mention the direct attack on FN-PBR sales that this rifle will have. The FN PBR is about $300-$400 more expensive, uses the same stock but with the full aluminum bedding block, the action isn't as smooth, and the one I tested was not as accurate. But, the FN-PBR does have a detachable magazine, claw extractor, wider gap in the barrel channel for no stock touching, that full aluminum bedding block, and it is available in some other barrel lengths. But to be honest, FN is probably not very happy about this little rifle, especially if Remington decides to keep it in the lineup after this year. Don't get me wrong, the SPS-Tactical has some legit weaknesses, but at the price, and if they all perform like this one, it will be hard to chose a PBR, or possibly even some other lower end rifles. Of course, you do give up some velocity with the shorter barrel, and some of the workmanship isn't the best, and some minor things like only a single stud up front keep it from being a truly great rifle, but the rifle does shoot very well and is completely functional in its intended role and deserves some consideration.


HEATH223  [Member]
11/11/2008 6:38:22 PM
Originally Posted By unclemoak:
I'm pretty sure the Tactical comes from the factory in a Hogue overmolded.


Many did but I have seen some that had the SPS Varmint stock also.
sambeaux  [Team Member]
11/11/2008 7:02:51 PM
Originally Posted By jray05stang:
I already have an extremely tough time choosing! I wanna lean towards the tactical because I already have a dealer who stocks them and can get me 1 for a good price! One day I would like to shoot longer ranges but there are no ranges past 600 anywhere near me... Is the tactical really free floated? I thought there were problems with the stock being to flimsy causing the barrel to not be truly free floated??


From what I've read recently ( making the exact same decision ), there is no velocity loss
from the 26" to a 20" barrel with bullets that weigh 168gr or less. All the powder is burned in
20". Also, Snipercentral found better accuracy with the Tactical....

Sam
jray05stang  [Member]
11/11/2008 9:14:30 PM
I have also seen some showing up online and such with the sps varmint stock... I believe there is one in the tactical pictures thread... Remington is still showing the tactical with the Hogue Overmold stock so I am hoping thats still what they are shipping with... I believe the one I looked at had the overmold stock it did not have the holes cut into the stock like the varmint and the VTR... Thanks for all this info fellas! I pretty much have decided to go with the tactical it looks like just the firearm for me!
SigOwner_P229  [Team Member]
11/12/2008 8:43:09 AM
Originally Posted By jray05stang:
I have also seen some showing up online and such with the sps varmint stock... I believe there is one in the tactical pictures thread... Remington is still showing the tactical with the Hogue Overmold stock so I am hoping thats still what they are shipping with... I believe the one I looked at had the overmold stock it did not have the holes cut into the stock like the varmint and the VTR... Thanks for all this info fellas! I pretty much have decided to go with the tactical it looks like just the firearm for me!


If yours comes with a varmint stock, and mine comes with a hogue stock, I may be willing to trade you if you'd like. I haven't seen mine so I don't know what it has, but I would like to paint mine so the hogue stock is out for that (paint doesn't stick to rubber very well). Just throwing that idea out there for you to consider.
teddy12b  [Member]
11/12/2008 12:13:08 PM
You all already beat me to the point about the sps tacticals available with the sps varmint stock.

What's the twist in that barrel? Is it 1 in 10" or 1 in 12"? I don't think I'd buy one if it wasn't a 1 in 10".

As far as long range, your nikon buckmaster will be a great scope with 50 MOA of adjustment for elevation so that should get you out to around 700 - 800 yards max before you need a new base with MOA built into it.

I used to have a buckmaster 6-18 with the regular reticle and it was a great scope for accurate shooting out to 1000 yards.
Jayg0351  [Member]
11/12/2008 1:27:41 PM
I know you are looking at Remington but here is another otion. CDDN has the FN PBR in various lengths. The stock is a houge stock but is is fully aluminum bedded not just pillar beded. I have no problems with the rifle or the stock. You have to call CDDN and order it from them. I paid $600.00 for my 22" barrel recessed crown and a four groove, right hand, 1 in 12 twist rate. Just a suggestion.
jray05stang  [Member]
11/12/2008 2:27:50 PM
Both the Varmint and the Tactical come with 1 in 12 twist for the .308. I dont think Remington offers many barrels in less than 1 in 12 for the .308 just like the 5r and such... at least thats all I know of.
jray05stang  [Member]
11/12/2008 2:30:07 PM
Never mind I am corrected... the regular sps comes in a 1/10 twist for the .308
jray05stang  [Member]
11/12/2008 2:33:00 PM
Now that I am reading even closer the website does not say anything about the twist rate on the tactical... hmmm... I guess maybe its the same as the SPS hopefully just with the barrel cut down... anyone have any more insight?
quicksilver756  [Member]
11/12/2008 2:34:47 PM
sps as well as tactical is 12:1 rh twist. my hogue stock on my tactical does not touch what so ever. even with applied pressure down on the barrel I can get a stack of 4-5 peices of paper to freely slide back and forth. Glass bedding even make it better.
jray05stang  [Member]
11/12/2008 2:53:38 PM
I mean I dont think the 1/12 twist is bad. I mean Remington knows what they are doing with these rifles. Plus the m-24 has 1/11.5 twist... But also the twist may need to be more with a shorter barrel as opposed to the 24' or 26 inch barrels.
teddy12b  [Member]
11/12/2008 5:44:16 PM
One thing that bothers me is they don't mention the twist on the website. I like the 1 in 10" so you can use the heavier bullets, but that's just me.
jray05stang  [Member]
11/12/2008 6:13:26 PM
I would also like to be able to stabilize some heavier bullets but from what I read it handles some pretty heavy bullets pretty well... Anyone have any comment on this?
jray05stang  [Member]
11/13/2008 1:06:44 AM
What rings would you guys choose to mount a Nikon Buckmaster to the SPS Tactical?
quicksilver756  [Member]
11/13/2008 2:51:00 AM
well, the sps and buckmaster isn't exactly high end... theres no reason to through on a set of $150 pair of mounts. The Burris xtr rings are rock solid, and I can really crank on them. The burris signature rings are great as well, all steel.
teddy12b  [Member]
11/13/2008 8:56:56 AM
I agree that the sps & buckmaster aren't going to cost over $1,000 each and that's the point. You don't need a $5,000 rig to shoot long distances accurately.

We in the shooting sports are seeing too many people trying to turn target shooting into a rich mans sport, just like nowadays you have to actually be a lawyer to buy a new harley. I agree with the burris Xtreme rings. I've used them and I really like them. They are however, hard to find.

If you know where I can find a set of high burris rings for a 1" scope let me know.
KC-ROUGHNECK  [Team Member]
11/13/2008 11:43:33 AM
Taken from the write-up:

...this stock is not as stiff as I would like a stock to be. In fact, while using a bipod, the forend flexes enough to touch the barrel slightly.....


Is there any DIY things to get around/solve this small problem?

Could you sand off some material inside the stock where it's touching?

Use a brace/splint of some sort to make it more rigid?

Edited for spellang
wayne1one  [Member]
11/13/2008 3:45:55 PM
Originally Posted By beenaround:
I think the Tactical is a more solid piece in general- but that is just personal opinion. I had the .223 SPS but sold it and picked up the .308 SPS. Just dont go cheap and buy the Hogue stock- the Hogue is what I had an issue with when it came to the free float. The .308 I got came with the "middle class" stock, its a bit cheaper then the wood version but its been decent to me.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y100/beenaround/DSC_0094-2.jpg


Is this the SPS tactical LTD (the one with the varmit stock)
jray05stang  [Member]
11/13/2008 6:32:44 PM
That is the varmint stock for sure... Defiantly isnt the regular tactical stock... I never said I was going for a high dollar set up... I like the Buckmaster because its cheaper yet very effective... And the tactical has become a no brainer it will be my future gun! I was basically looking for a cheap starter precision setup...
tucansam  [Member]
11/16/2008 5:59:48 AM
Originally Posted By KC-ROUGHNECK:
Taken from the write-up:

...this stock is not as stiff as I would like a stock to be. In fact, while using a bipod, the forend flexes enough to touch the barrel slightly.....


Is there any DIY things to get around/solve this small problem?

Could you sand off some material inside the stock where it's touching?

Use a brace/splint of some sort to make it more rigid?

Edited for spellang




Bump because I have the same question. I am thinking of picking up a Tactical in .223 and was wondering if Devcon putty along the entire stock, filling in the gaps, would be a good bet?

SigOwner_P229  [Team Member]
11/16/2008 11:10:55 AM
Originally Posted By tucansam:
Originally Posted By KC-ROUGHNECK:
Taken from the write-up:

...this stock is not as stiff as I would like a stock to be. In fact, while using a bipod, the forend flexes enough to touch the barrel slightly.....


Is there any DIY things to get around/solve this small problem?

Could you sand off some material inside the stock where it's touching?

Use a brace/splint of some sort to make it more rigid?

Edited for spellang




Bump because I have the same question. I am thinking of picking up a Tactical in .223 and was wondering if Devcon putty along the entire stock, filling in the gaps, would be a good bet?



Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of having a free floated barrel? I'm no expert but I believe that it will destroy any accuracy that it had before filling in. I think you want to do the opposite and relieve any area that IS touching the barrel.
tm965  [Member]
11/16/2008 11:14:41 AM
following some info I read about someone sanding down their stock, I used a dremel on mine and the barrel now free floats with a bipod on. it was very simple
tucansam  [Member]
11/16/2008 1:20:48 PM
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of having a free floated barrel? I'm no expert but I believe that it will destroy any accuracy that it had before filling in. I think you want to do the opposite and relieve any area that IS touching the barrel.


Sorry, I should have been more clear.

My plan is to buy the rifle, relieve the barrel channel if necessary, and then fill in all the gaps with devcon. So the barrel would still be free floating, the stock would just no longer be hollow, and thus more rigid and strong.
SigOwner_P229  [Team Member]
11/17/2008 11:55:36 AM
Originally Posted By tucansam:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of having a free floated barrel? I'm no expert but I believe that it will destroy any accuracy that it had before filling in. I think you want to do the opposite and relieve any area that IS touching the barrel.


Sorry, I should have been more clear.

My plan is to buy the rifle, relieve the barrel channel if necessary, and then fill in all the gaps with devcon. So the barrel would still be free floating, the stock would just no longer be hollow, and thus more rigid and strong.


Ah, you mean the empty space between the gussets in the barrel channel. I think it would likely be stronger and lighter if you would just remove the gussets and fill with glass or carbon fiber mat and resin. That is what I plan to do if I don't like my SPS Tac stock (haven't been able to pick it up from the fun-shop yet).
KC-ROUGHNECK  [Team Member]
11/17/2008 12:06:25 PM
Originally Posted By tm965:
following some info I read about someone sanding down their stock, I used a dremel on mine and the barrel now free floats with a bipod on. it was very simple


Do you remember where you found that info?

How long ago did you do it/is it holding up fine?

About how much material did you have to remove?

tm965  [Member]
11/17/2008 12:45:14 PM
Originally Posted By KC-ROUGHNECK:
Originally Posted By tm965:
following some info I read about someone sanding down their stock, I used a dremel on mine and the barrel now free floats with a bipod on. it was very simple


Do you remember where you found that info?

How long ago did you do it/is it holding up fine?

About how much material did you have to remove?



im relatively sure someone else posted how they had modified theirs on this forum a while back. they said something along the lines of they removed the stock and dremmeled down the ribs a bit and the rubberized front end of the stock to make it work. it sounded simple enough and inspired me to give it a try. it was as easy as it sounds. i first sanded down the plastic ribs inside the stock an equal amount (just a little bit, maybe a cm or so) to ensure a free float. I then sanded down the rubberized just enough to where the barrel didnt touch with the bipod on. id add back the barrel and action every once in a while to see what still needed to be done. as the original poster said, there is a decent amount of rubber coating on the front of the stock and i never sanded through to the plastic. the barrel is now free float with the bipod on, even when I add additional pressure.

Overall, I did not have to remove much material. It took about 30 minutes to do. The stock isnt noticeably flimsier than it was to begin with.

I did it about a month or two ago, before I had even shot it because I couldnt decide if I wanted to make the jump on a new stock. i think I am going to leave it as is. with the trigger down to 2-3 lbs (surprisingly easy to adjust), its given me some great groups and im positive it can shoot better than I can, so no need for me to upgrade any further at this point. Im using it for whitetail, targets, and any other critters that I happen to see on my land.

Its held up just fine. poi has not changed and I have about 100 down the tube. its gotten banged around a little and is pretty muddy at the moment from my last trip out. so far so good. ill post if I have any trouble with it, but I dont expect to at this point
tucansam  [Member]
11/17/2008 3:13:04 PM
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:Ah, you mean the empty space between the gussets in the barrel channel. I think it would likely be stronger and lighter if you would just remove the gussets and fill with glass or carbon fiber mat and resin. That is what I plan to do if I don't like my SPS Tac stock (haven't been able to pick it up from the fun-shop yet).




Interesting. I would have thought the strength would be better maintained if you left the ribs in place; is that not the case?

SigOwner_P229  [Team Member]
11/17/2008 8:19:04 PM
Originally Posted By tucansam:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:Ah, you mean the empty space between the gussets in the barrel channel. I think it would likely be stronger and lighter if you would just remove the gussets and fill with glass or carbon fiber mat and resin. That is what I plan to do if I don't like my SPS Tac stock (haven't been able to pick it up from the fun-shop yet).




Interesting. I would have thought the strength would be better maintained if you left the ribs in place; is that not the case?



The problem with just filling the voids in with epoxy is that there really isn't an "fiber" attaching it to the ribs. You will basically have blocks of very hard epoxy stuck in between ribs of composite. It will strengthen it, but not as much as a full composite inlay (fiberglass or carbon fiber) all the way. If you remove it and fill with fiber you can likely get the same strength with less weight or more strength at the same weight. As a disclaimer, I cannot prove this or back it up. I haven't done it, and I'm not even sure what the Hogue stock is made of, but I'm pretty sure that if you do a complete composite fiber inlay rather than the ribs with voids filled with epoxy, you'll have much more strength.
The_Reaper  [Life Member]
11/18/2008 8:54:55 PM
I'm interested in obtaining one of these, but I have a question about
their extraction/ejection.

All of the bolt action firearms I have fail to flick the spent brass out of the
chamber area, meaning I have to reach in or tip the rifle on it's side.

Is the Remington any better?

When I was in grade school, my dad had a bolt gun that would hold onto the
brass as you pulled the bolt back, as slowly as you wanted, then something
would flick the brass out of the way pretty sharply.

tm965  [Member]
11/18/2008 9:16:48 PM
Originally Posted By The_Reaper:
I'm interested in obtaining one of these, but I have a question about
their extraction/ejection.

All of the bolt action firearms I have fail to flick the spent brass out of the
chamber area, meaning I have to reach in or tip the rifle on it's side.

Is the Remington any better?

When I was in grade school, my dad had a bolt gun that would hold onto the
brass as you pulled the bolt back, as slowly as you wanted, then something
would flick the brass out of the way pretty sharply.



ive had two problems so far with extraction. both were likely my fault as i opened the bolt very slowly: 1. extracting a live round from the chamber after not seeing any whitetail- i wanted to catch the round so i opened it slowly which ended up not ejecting the round, leaving it loose. 2. same idea, opened too slowly after firing

that being said, i have a custom sporter built around a 44 german m98 action which will eject brass every time regardless of how you open the bolt.


on a side note-

Anyone else notice how badly the action deforms soft point bullets (fed powershok) when using the internal box? it takes a good shove to chamber a round, deforming the tip. Any solution or is this what I should expect? Havent had this problem with any of my other rifles with the exception of a savage 22 & hp's. Thanks
jray05stang  [Member]
11/18/2008 9:51:45 PM
Well I decided to go with the SPS Tactical for my gun of choice... I went to my gun shop today to order mine... What a deal too... $519 and I still have the $40 Remington Discount coming... They had to order the gun and it will take up to 2 weeks to get here... Now I just need to order the Nikon Buckmaster scope and rings! Still trying to figure out which base and rings would be good with my gun and scope choice... Any suggestions?
CmdrTaco  [Team Member]
11/18/2008 10:14:32 PM
Originally Posted By jray05stang:
Well I decided to go with the SPS Tactical for my gun of choice... I went to my gun shop today to order mine... What a deal too... $519 and I still have the $40 Remington Discount coming... They had to order the gun and it will take up to 2 weeks to get here... Now I just need to order the Nikon Buckmaster scope and rings! Still trying to figure out which base and rings would be good with my gun and scope choice... Any suggestions?


I have a 700 Varmint in .308

I also have a Buckmaster 6-18 on it. I used the Burris XTR extra wide rings, and they have worked great.

I also replaced my stock (I like to refer to it as "Tupperware") as soon as I got it, with an H.S. Precision stock.
TheEngineer  [Member]
11/19/2008 1:50:29 PM
Dick's Sporting Goods has the SPS varmints on sale now for $499.00. Add in their $20.00 rebate and Remington's $40.00 rebate and it gets down to around $440.00. Mine came with a cheapo Remington 4-12X40 scope and mounting hardware, too.

Sometimes they can be a pain in the A$$ and tell you they don't sell .308's because it is a "military caliber". They do sell them, you just have to be persistent. I went to get one and the salesman told me they did not sell any rifles in .308. I politely asked if he would check in the back, and he returned with one in .308. The look on his face... oh that was good.
ExKalifornian  [Member]
11/19/2008 7:23:13 PM
Thanks all for the read. this thread just answered all my questions. Is 569 + tax good for the sps tactical 308?
jray05stang  [Member]
11/19/2008 10:43:44 PM
I would say its a good deal... Anywhere around the 550 range is pretty good for the Tactical Price wise... Plus you will have the $40 Remington rebate right?
Poodleshooter  [Member]
11/20/2008 12:56:54 AM
Originally Posted By TheEngineer:
Dick's Sporting Goods has the SPS varmints on sale now for $499.00. Add in their $20.00 rebate and Remington's $40.00 rebate and it gets down to around $440.00. Mine came with a cheapo Remington 4-12X40 scope and mounting hardware, too.

I'm looking at that sale,too. I can go Savage 10FP for $550,or this really good deal for an SPS Varmint (though I'm stuck with the green stock).
I hate when a choice is between a great deal that's 90% of what I want,and an average deal for 100% of what I'm looking for.
If it was an SPS tactical,I wouldn't even have thought twice about it.


TheEngineer  [Member]
11/20/2008 4:02:59 PM
Originally Posted By Poodleshooter:If it was an SPS tactical,I wouldn't even have thought twice about it.


Dick's seems to have a really hard time with anything that has the prefix "tactical" attached to it.

I'm working on the "green stock" as we speak. I just filled the stock cavity with Great Stuff expanding foam, will try to float the barrel, and maybe krylon the stock. If it doesn't work out, I'll eventually get a Bell and Carlson A2 Varmint/Tactical.
Sandman762  [Member]
11/20/2008 6:56:29 PM
Hellow , new to AR15.com but been checking out the sight for a long time. My experiance with this is. I like you was trying to decide on the 700 SPS Varmit/Tactical & the VTR. I decided on a 700 SPS Varmit in 308 due to it was on sale. I installed a Millett one piece base. Burris extreme rings, a B&C light tactical stock and a Nikon BM 6X18 with BDC. The rifle shot decent out of the box but after changing it, it shoots MOA or better at 100 yards if I do my part. The nice thing is I have aprox $900 dollers in it. I was really surpised.
mogunr1  [Member]
11/20/2008 8:32:50 PM
Replaced the Hogue on my SPS Tactical with Bell & Carlson w/ aluminum bedding block.
B&C Medalist
$215 well spent
mogunr1  [Member]
11/20/2008 8:34:19 PM
Originally Posted By Sandman762:
Hellow , new to AR15.com but been checking out the sight for a long time. My experiance with this is. I like you was trying to decide on the 700 SPS Varmit/Tactical & the VTR. I decided on a 700 SPS Varmit in 308 due to it was on sale. I installed a Millett one piece base. Burris extreme rings, a B&C light tactical stock and a Nikon BM 6X18 with BDC. The rifle shot decent out of the box but after changing it, it shoots MOA or better at 100 yards if I do my part. The nice thing is I have aprox $900 dollers in it. I was really surpised.



Welcome Sandman 762 - Post #1
SickMAK90  [Member]
11/20/2008 10:57:57 PM
I have a SPS tactical myself. I really like it. I have yet to shoot any really good ammo but I still get decent groups. I may try to dremel the stock down some since I don't want to buy a stock yet.

I didn't go crazy with my scope since it is a deer hunting rifle. I went with a bushnell elite 3200 3-9x with the firefly rectical. However, after hunting season I may get a different scope and put the bushnell on my 10/22.