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 Remington Woodmaster 742 Disassembly/reassembly instructions?
Stage1  [Member]
9/11/2007 2:07:04 PM
I was given a like new condition Remington Woodmaster 742 30.06 semi-auto from my father.

I want to take the rifle apart and clean it.

Can anyone help me find a PDA or some site that has disassembly/reassembly instructions?
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MHIDPA  [Member]
9/11/2007 2:40:27 PM
I'm pretty sure I have the manual in a PDF on my other computer. I'll try and find it and give it to you.


ETA: the 742 definatly does not fit in the Precision Rifle forum
Stage1  [Member]
9/11/2007 5:08:52 PM
If you could hook me up with the PDA file I would appreciate it.
seeyouinvalhalla  [Member]
9/11/2007 5:39:15 PM
You sound like a fine, up and coming young gun owner so I am going to give you some excellent advice that I wish someone would have given me 20 years ago. There are a series of books that show disassembly/assembly for types of guns. I have one that covers sporting type rifles (which your gun is) and one that covers shotguns, and one that covers rimfires. They are usually about $20 a piece. If you plan on collecting more guns, get the book with the rifles in it, it shows how to take apart and reassemble like 100 different rifles and will pay for itself on the first gun, this is coming from someone who screwed up more than my fair share of small gun parts before I got the book. Also, get a set of gunsmith screwdrivers from Brownells, they are $$ but you really do NEED them. Good luck.
gunnut284  [Team Member]
9/12/2007 5:59:57 AM

Originally Posted By seeyouinvalhalla:
You sound like a fine, up and coming young gun owner so I am going to give you some excellent advice that I wish someone would have given me 20 years ago. There are a series of books that show disassembly/assembly for types of guns. I have one that covers sporting type rifles (which your gun is) and one that covers shotguns, and one that covers rimfires. They are usually about $20 a piece. If you plan on collecting more guns, get the book with the rifles in it, it shows how to take apart and reassemble like 100 different rifles and will pay for itself on the first gun, this is coming from someone who screwed up more than my fair share of small gun parts before I got the book. Also, get a set of gunsmith screwdrivers from Brownells, they are $$ but you really do NEED them. Good luck.


+1 on the books

Also don't try to take it apart unless you are sure you have the tools and skill to put it back together again as well. There is a special wrench for the 742 (and 7400) if you want to remove the bolt/barrel. The 742 is not the easiest gun to take apart and put back together. If you don't have the tools and/or the knowledge/mechanical ability to do it right, pay a professional. Good luck.

ETA: I just noticed the "like new condition" part. If it is in good shape I would just clean/lube with it assembled. I wouldn't go further than dropping the trigger group and removing the forearm.
Stage1  [Member]
9/12/2007 11:07:41 AM
After hearing your guys responses and responses from other parts of the forum I am not going to take it apart.

I am not really a nub to the rifle scene, I have been collecting C&R rifles and doing all the work on them myself for almost seven years now.

I am just not really versed in semi auto hunting rifles.

The main reason why I wanted to take it apart is because of it jamming at random times while out target practicing.

Besides a good cleaning job is there anything you can do to prohibit the rifle from jamming?
gunnut284  [Team Member]
9/12/2007 12:17:52 PM
By "jamming" what specifically is it doing/not doing? The 742/7400 have been notorious for getting rust in the chamber area (even on "like new" samples). If sticky extraction is the problem that is the first place I would look. If it is rusty you may be able to polish out the rust and limit the issue. Keep the chamber clean and oiled. If the issue is something else you will have to describe the problem.
flatfender  [Team Member]
9/12/2007 12:21:37 PM
Remington has an owners manual in pdf for the 7400 with cleaning instructions and an exploded view w/ parts list.
METT-T  [Team Member]
9/12/2007 12:32:32 PM
742s eat themselves. The bolt lugs will eventually chew up the receiver to the point where the weapon is basically a single shot. That's a big contributor to their bad reputation. Keeping it clean helps, but from the first shot on it's just a matter of time. Take a look at your receiver rail and see if you see the marks. Oftentimes a Woodsmaster will look brand new on the outside and be heavily worn in the receiver.

That having been said, I still occasionally use a 742 of my granddad's. It hasn't seen a whole bunch of rounds downrange and will usually go thru a whole mag without jamming. I shot a nice 8 pointer with it last year, actually.
Stage1  [Member]
9/12/2007 12:57:20 PM
The rifle doesn't have more than 100 rounds through it. The internals have no rust whatsoever.

I cleaned the bore out which looks really nice. I cleaned the inside of the receiver and what not through the mag well and there is no rust anywhere to be seen.

I don't see any wear like you are speaking of inside the receiver.

When cleaning it I was only able to get the bolt to lock back one time. Is there a trick to getting it to stay back?

After repeatedly pulling the bolt back and letting it go forward it seems right before the bolt settles into the final resting place sometimes the front side of the bolt gets caught on a piece of metal that is on the inside left portion of the reciever. This will stop the bolt from going all the way forward about one out of ten times when letting the action go forward.

While slowly letting the action slide forward you can see it is hitting this piece of metal.

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