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 Cheapest way to remove the crimp on Military 5.56 brass
FREEFALLE7  [Team Member]
1/19/2009 9:41:23 PM
I have sized some cases and noticed I can put a primer in LC brass that I didnt do the so call crimp removal on.

I only put two primers in as I don't have powder and bullets yet.

They went right in with no issues.

Can I just use the deburing tool and spin it a couple of times to remove the crimp or do I have toy use the Swaging tool?

When i look at this LC brass I don't even see any kinda so called crimp.

Thanks in advance for answering my dumb questions.

Thanks
FREE
DeadWoodDan  [Member]
1/19/2009 9:55:26 PM
Were did the brass come from? there is a company(can't remember name) that reloads LC brass and other brands and sells so it is possible there is no crimp.

Uni-Vibe  [Member]
1/19/2009 9:56:09 PM
Cheapest way is to use a pocket knife. But that's not the best idea.

There are two basic ways of removing primer crimp. (1) reaming, which removes the crimp and leaves a beveled surface, and (2) swaging, which pushes the crimp back and leaves a curved surface. Both work fine if done correctly.

Reaming can be done with the same hand tool you use to chamfer case mouths, Wilson, RCBS, everyone makes one. Or you can get a dedicated hand or power primer crimp reamer.

Swaging is best done with the Dillon model 600 swager.


If you have a bunch to do, or plan on reloading for the long term, I'd quit worrying about the cheapest way, figure out which way you want to go, and buy the best tool for the job.
DeadWoodDan  [Member]
1/19/2009 9:59:49 PM
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=501588

this is probably the cheapest tool. i used one like it and mounted in a drill press and it was pretty quick BUT if your doing a large lot......hands/fingers will start to hurt AND must be careful not to take out to much. i have seen many tools like this that are cheap and will do the job
astronwolf  [Member]
1/19/2009 10:02:29 PM
This is what I do:

Powered primer pocket reaming
ma96782  [Team Member]
1/19/2009 10:52:16 PM
IMHO…..DON'T USE THIS STYLE OF TOOL..........

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=364181&t=11082005

Someone once asked: Why Not?

A standard reamer/de-burr tool could be used but, your results will vary greatly. In my younger days I tried using it but, I encountered problems with getting squared cuts and sometimes over doing it.

Currently, I use these tools......

Large Primer Pocket Size #7777785

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=682934

Small Primer Pocket Size #7777784

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=643126

With, the Lyman Hand tool I've eliminated those problems. It has a safe edge on the bottom.....it won't cut the pocket deeper. The cutter will simply spin, via hand power, cutting off the crimp. It'll leave a slight chamfer to the primer pocket opening. It will correct an undersized pocket and an "out of round" condition, but only to the limits of the tool's cutting edge, under hand power. The main pocket diameter won't be enlarged, unless you force the tool to the sidewalls. And, the cutting edge can be dulled, IF you wanted to do that. It's a "hand tool" and I wouldn't mount it in a drill........but, that's ME.

BTW, my Speer #10 Re-loading manual has a picture of a pocket knife being used to cut a military crimp out (page 71).

And, for commercial cases, IF needed, the Lyman hand tool will also slightly "chamfer" the primer pocket opening that has that "sharp edge." And, while it's in there.....IF, the primer pocket is too small, it'll do it's magic for that problem, too. Then again, sometimes just changing your brand of primer can work.

Perhaps, using the wrong tool and/or other mis-useage of a hand de-crimp reamer, may be the reason why, some people are so anti-reamer?

You know the saying about using the right tool for the job?

Well, IMHO......the right tool, is the one specially made for the job of addressing the crimp. In this case, I use a Lyman Hand military de-crimp reamer tool.

Not to mention that, the learning curve is so short. Just insert the tool into the primer pocket, twist, remove the tool and it’s done. It’s the sort of a mindless operation, that I can do while watching T.V.

IF, you choose the swage method (Dillon $94.95).........so be it.

YMWV.

Aloha, Mark


ChuckBronson  [Team Member]
1/19/2009 11:06:42 PM
I use the press mounted RCBS swaging tool. Its pretty cheap and works great. I prefer swaging because it doesnt remove any material, just "pushes" it out of the way.




ETA- I have also installed primers without removing the crimp, however, it takes a lot of force to push these in. I have actually deformed primers using this method. Primers are designed to go off with an impact, not a slow, smashing force, but you never know. Just be very careful if you decide not to remove the crimp.
USMC223  [Member]
1/19/2009 11:09:04 PM
Originally Posted By ChuckBronson:
I use the press mounted RCBS swaging tool. Its pretty cheap and works great. I prefer swaging because it doesnt remove any material, just "pushes" it out of the way.


+1
-edgecrusher-  [Team Member]
1/19/2009 11:22:42 PM
buy the Dillon, buy it new, buy it used (good luck finding a used one) Be done with it
COSteve  [Team Member]
1/20/2009 12:03:12 AM
"Cheapest way to remove the crimp on Military 5.56 brass"

Hornady small primer reamer and handle for about $8 for one primer size. About $11 for both.

astronwolf  [Member]
1/20/2009 12:06:12 AM
Originally Posted By COSteve:
Hornady small primer reamer and handle for about $8 for one primer size. About $11 for both.


...chucked to a drill press....
-edgecrusher-  [Team Member]
1/20/2009 12:13:11 AM
Originally Posted By COSteve:
"Cheapest way to remove the crimp on Military 5.56 brass"

Hornady small primer reamer and handle for about $8 for one primer size. About $11 for both.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v726/Coloradoglocker/100_1975.jpg


time=money
glorifiedG  [Team Member]
1/20/2009 2:45:35 AM
You must have some special LC brass because I can't even sorta seat primers in them. I tried the de-burring tool method and seating still was not smooth, thus I ordered the Dillon Super Swage, should be here Wednesday
LuvBUSHmaster  [Team Member]
1/20/2009 8:29:07 AM
Like buying cheap holsters, you actually may spend more buying a few "cheaper" options that just don't work as well and then eventually realizing that the"expensive" option saves you frustration, time, and cramped fingers .

I'd spring for the Dillion Super Swagger and be done with it. Swag out crimps in all flavors of 5.56 as well as M2 ball, M80 ball, etc when you switch the swagging "heads" to the larger provided head.

I tried the chuck the bit in the drill method and go at the crimped brass...that lasted all of 200 pieces of brass until I bought a super swagger online with cramped fingers poised over the key board late one night two years ago
COSteve  [Team Member]
1/20/2009 10:49:31 AM
Originally Posted By LuvBUSHmaster:
Like buying cheap holsters, you actually may spend more buying a few "cheaper" options that just don't work as well and then eventually realizing that the"expensive" option saves you frustration, time, and cramped fingers .

I'd spring for the Dillion Super Swagger and be done with it. Swag out crimps in all flavors of 5.56 as well as M2 ball, M80 ball, etc when you switch the swagging "heads" to the larger provided head.

I tried the chuck the bit in the drill method and go at the crimped brass...that lasted all of 200 pieces of brass until I bought a super swagger online with cramped fingers poised over the key board late one night two years ago

I resisted buying a Super Swage for a long time, however, that was a mistake. I wrote a review of it in the Resources section above but I'll quote it here for simplicity.

"Dillon Super Swage 600 - The Super Swage's value was a bit more esoteric to me at first and I only really understood it's true value after I had reloaded a couple thousand of the swaged cases. My Hornady reamer worked well mounted in my drillpress and I could smoke through 1,000 cases in an hour. My hands were tired and my fingers were sore but I got them done.

The Dillon swage allowed me to process the primer crimp about as fast as the Hornady trimmer (maybe a bit slower but not much) without the cramping hand and beat up fingers. So, you might ask, what's that much better about it? Why is it worth the extra $90?

It turns out that the swager's real value comes when you decide to reload those processed cases. You find that it processes a much more consistent, smoother, and evener primer pocket rim. That translates into a much more relaxed and enjoyable reloading session as the primers literally slide into the case. I can now feel how firm the primer is being gripped by the case walls without any annoying dragging or hang ups starting the primer into the case.

In truth, it turns out that a consistent primer pocket rim, with the well rounded edge to aid in primer insertion, is worth a lot in ease of operation, speed of operation, lack of hung primers, and an overall increase in priming quality.

The swage provides a more even, finished, and repeatable primer pocket which allows for an easier priming cycle."

markm  [Member]
1/20/2009 11:49:00 AM
Originally Posted By -edgecrusher-:
Originally Posted By COSteve:
"Cheapest way to remove the crimp on Military 5.56 brass"

Hornady small primer reamer and handle for about $8 for one primer size. About $11 for both.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v726/Coloradoglocker/100_1975.jpg


time=money


I can run brass just as fast with the hornady in the drill as I did with the swager. I like the consistency of the hornday MUCH better.
-edgecrusher-  [Team Member]
1/20/2009 12:52:48 PM
Originally Posted By markm:
Originally Posted By -edgecrusher-:
Originally Posted By COSteve:
"Cheapest way to remove the crimp on Military 5.56 brass"

Hornady small primer reamer and handle for about $8 for one primer size. About $11 for both.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v726/Coloradoglocker/100_1975.jpg


time=money


I can run brass just as fast with the hornady in the drill as I did with the swager. I like the consistency of the hornday MUCH better.


these things happen...

sorry couldn't resist, however i consider the hornady a nice tool, but think it shortens case life compared to the swager...
glorifiedG  [Team Member]
1/20/2009 10:21:48 PM
I lied, it got here today, one day shipping is schweet
jmart  [Member]
1/20/2009 11:00:32 PM
Originally Posted By astronwolf:
Originally Posted By COSteve:
Hornady small primer reamer and handle for about $8 for one primer size. About $11 for both.


...chucked to a drill press....


We have a winner!!!!