AR15.Com Archives
 M1 .30 carbine a feasible SHTF gun?
mmsurber  [Member]
5/24/2008 12:47:15 AM
Well? Is it?
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timb3  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 1:21:03 AM
Sure it is. I'd suggest that you use Remington JSP ammo though. The FMJ rounds have a reputation for over penetration, where the JSP's penetrate well, but expand for better results in the target.
Abbot_Hayes  [Member]
5/24/2008 1:23:59 AM
In a world without options its fine, but in reality there are many better options before one should give into a gun in a hard to find caliber with hard to find replacement parts.
Josh3239  [Member]
5/24/2008 1:30:39 AM
The M1 Carbine was not meant to be a "combat rifle". It was meant as a self defense weapon for non combat personnel should they be forced to defend themselves. It has a longer range and was more accurate then the sidearm issued at the time, the Colt 1911. So for self defense, it is fine for that.

Personally, the only knock I have against it for SHTF is ammo. The .30 carbine is both expensive and less common. Other than that it lightweight, short, low recoil, and fairly reliable all of which should make anyone happy in a combat/SHTF/self defense situation.
Ryno_the_wyno  [Member]
5/24/2008 2:50:00 AM
Absolutely. Think about all of the people who used it as a defensive/offensive weapon during WWII, Korea, Vietnam and beyond. You could say its a pre-pre-ban M4....

Accuracy, penetration, range and lethality are all adequate. Standard 110grn 7.62x33 FMJ ball isn't the best in terms of terminal ballistics, but it is capable of adequate lethality. 5.56 can be capable of outstanding terminal ballistics, provided that you use appropriate ammo. Some people, my self included, maintain a sizeable stock-pile of Mk262/TAP/M855/M193 etc, however plenty of people use Wolf or some other non-fragmenting .223 ammo. Compared to the latter, the .30 Carbine isn't that bad. When using JSP or appropriate JHP ammo, it provides excellent terminal ballistics. When using Corbon DPX ammo with the Barnes bullet, there is a considerable gain in terminal effect.

While it is a light carbine, it was intended to replace or supplement the M1 Garand and M1911A1 for those who couldn't use a rifle or needed more than a handgun. Just know that engaging targets at 300 yards with great effect may be beyond the envelope of this system. Then again, enagement distances on the battlefield shrink every conflict. As a civilian, especially in an urban area, its difficult to imagine shots being beyond 100 yards. Its best to compare an M1 Carbine to a .357 Magnum lever gun, PS90 or 9mm AR. Its closer to those three than a Mini 14 or AR15. However, compared to the 3 "pistol caliber carbines" I mentioned, the M1 compares very favorably, and you could argue its superiority.

A nice USGI or CMP carbine, or possibly a proven/trused Kahr, equipped with an Ultimak rail and Aimpoint Micro/Trijicon RX30 and loaded with Corbon DPX's, would make for an outstanding defensive carbine. It would be fast/handy/light/accurate and pack enough punch for defensive use. Its range/lethality are both adequate and its barrier penetration is excellent.

As much as I like M1 Carbines, it would be hard to argue that they are the best all-around choice for SHTF or defensive use. No matter how good they are, an AR15 or even Mini 14 has considerable advantages. A 20 inch A2/A4 or 16 inch carbine are probably the best defensive carbines availible. Modularity and commonality are very strong, as is reliability/accuracy/durability.

If you have an M1 Carbine, by all means-"run what you brung". There are way worse choices....However, if you are looking for a SHTF carbine to purchase, the AR15 platform is the only choice.
NYPatriot  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 3:13:50 AM

Originally Posted By Ryno_the_wyno:

A nice USGI or CMP carbine, or possibly a proven/trused Kahr, equipped with an Ultimak rail and Aimpoint Micro/Trijicon RX30 and loaded with Corbon DPX's, would make for an outstanding defensive carbine. It would be fast/handy/light/accurate and pack enough punch for defensive use. Its range/lethality are both adequate and its barrier penetration is excellent.


+ Corbon DPX's equals a capable SHTF gun.
grendelbane  [Member]
5/24/2008 3:21:36 AM
+1 what Ryno said.

The carbine does have some advantages. One advantage is that females seem to handle it better than other choices. I have seen this several times. This also applies to 9mm AR15 carbines, so I think it is a reaction to blast, and noise, more than it is to recoil.

With proper ammunition, there is nothing wrong with an M1 carbine. It is an expensive choice, but that should not be a problem for arfcommers.

I don't know how those CMP carbines are working out. I do know that my Blue Sky carbine, purchased for $140 back in the day, really needed a new recoil spring.

Properly refurbished, a carbine should provide excellent service.
targshooter  [Member]
5/24/2008 9:59:35 AM
The 5.56x45 was originally intended to replace the M1 Carbine and US Submachine guns. The cartridge was not intended to be effective beyond 300 yards nor to serve in the role of sniper or battle rifle cartridge. To this purpose I believe the round as designed is effective and serves its purpose.
This passage offers a direct comparison of the two cartridges’ performances in their respective firearms. The AR used was a Stag 16 inch barrel M4 carbine with the A2 carry handle and sights. The US Carbine was an Inland Division with a glass bedded recoil lug and barrel channel. It had the later issue rear sight with windage and elevation adjustment. Both are capable of about 3 MOA when sandbagged at 100 yards.
The .30 carbine ammo was US GI surplus from the DCM.
The 5.56 ammo was 55 grain Hornady FMJBT over 27 grains Winchester 748.
Except for the 100 yard accuracy determination shooting and 300 meter firing from the bench with the carbine for sight adjustment, all firing was offhand at 100, 200 yards and 300M.
Two shooters were involved, each firing 10 shots with each gun offhand at 100, 200 yards and 300 meters. Both shooters are offhand shooters who frequently use the 200 yard and 300 meter ranges. Both shooters shoot AR15s, one (myself) has shot US M1 Carbines in the past, and one shooter owns and shoots the above mentioned carbine presently, but typically not at 300 meters.
100 Yards:
M1 Carbine; the rifle and cartridge form a good partnership at this range. The sight is on the second stop on the elevation slide. The sight picture is adequate for quick and accurate shooting. The cartridge seems to get to target with little delay.
AR15 Carbine; although not as quick to the shoulder and onto the target as the M1 Carbine, the M4 sight picture is excellent with the close in aperture extended. The bullet arrives on target almost simultaneously with the pull of the trigger.
200 yards:
M1 Carbine; the sight must be adjusted up to the third stop on the elevation slide. The sight picture requires a little time for proper target shot placement. The time from the pull on the trigger to the bullet’s arrival at target is realizable, the plop of the bullet into the target arriving back to the shooter well after the report has dissipated.
AR15 Carbine; the long range aperture provides a target framing picture that allows for rapid shots at this range. This property offsets the rapid shouldering allowed by the M1 Carbine. the bullet arrives on target very soon after the trigger is pulled. There is no sound of target impact that can be differentiated from the report.
300 yards:
M1 Carbine; the sight must be placed on the fourth notch on the elevation slide for this range. The sight picture takes some concentration at this range. A rapid offhand shot is not possible. The bullet arrives long after the report from firing has dissipated.
AR15 Carbine; the sight setting remains in place, having been centered for a 200 yard zero, at 300 meters this required that the bullseye is covered with the front sight and the shot taken. The sight picture is excellent. A fairly rapid offhand shot is practical, with a good chance of hitting the target. The bullet impact is finally discernible from the dissipated report.
Comparison Summary of the M1 Carbine/.30 Carbine system with the AR15 Carbine/5.56 system.
Handling:
The little M1 Carbine is second to none in its ability to get the butt plate to the shooter’s shoulder rapidly. Although slower, the AR15 Carbine handles very well and is probably only milliseconds behind the little M1.
Ergonomics:
Both the M1 and AR15 have very good ergonomics.
Sight picture:
The AR15 A2 sights offer s superior sight picture, at least for my eyes. The front blade/wings image fits perfectly into either aperture for indexing quickly and accurately on the target. I have to hunt for the M1 Carbine sight and make a more time consuming effort to place it on target at 200 yards and 300M.
The Ammunition:
Recoil: Neither the .30 Carbine or the 5.56x45 generate recoil which can be felt to any degree at the shoulder. Additionally, neither cartridge causes a muzzle jump which pushes the sights far off target during the recoil cycle. Both offer fast sight to target picture recovery, great for placing multiple hits on targets requiring such.
.30 Carbine; it was noticed during the shooting that the M1 Carbine sight had to be moved for accurate sight placement to an elevation setting for each range. We tried the following, use the 200 yard setting for 100 yards and 300 meters. At 100 yards the bullet struck 5-7 inches high. This seems usable for its intended purpose. Now we tried it at 300 meters. Here we had to hold a generous 2+ feet high to get hits near the bullseye, the key word being near. This would not work under field conditions. So, the inevitable, the 300 yard sight setting used at 100 yards and 200 yards. This doesn’t work, being a generous foot high at 100 yards and almost 2 feet high at 200. So, the little carbine round requires sight settings for 100, 200 and 300 if it is to be used reliably at these ranges. Limit it to 200 yards and the 200 yards setting does well enough.
5.56x45; the rifle is registered for 200 yards. At 100 yards in the offhand it is about 1 -2 inches high, definitely not a factor for its intended purpose. At 300 meters the 200 yard NRA bullseye must just be covered with the front sight to get centered hits. This is not a difficult task and the shooting done offhand at 300M in this manner is both quick and accurate.
Well, let’s move in to 30-50 yards and do some fast snap shooting on targets of opportunity in a sand pit. Here the targets are stones, cans and small woodchuck size shipping boxes placed on a ledge in a solid earthen backstop extending 10 feet above the targets. The AR does well, especially with its large, close in aperture flipped up. Here, the little M1 Carbine comes into its own. It is faster to shoulder and shoot than the AR.
Final Analysis:
At 100 yards and under the M1 Carbine and its cartridge may be the system of choice. The M1 Carbine is quicker to target and the little carbine cartridge is not hampered by its trajectory and low velocity. Moving targets will require an impressively long lead at any distance over 100 yards. Relative to the 5.56, this little round takes a long time to heat the barrel. The 5.56 comes into its own where one may want the use of a weapon sighted for 200 yards allowing good shot placement at 300 meters, while also being effective at 100 yards and under on the same sight setting. The lead required on moving targets at all distances is reduced by this cartridge’s high initial velocity. I do believe a hit is more likely across the spectrum of ranges from the muzzle to 300 meters with the AR15 rifle and 5.56 cartridge system than with the US Carbine system.
steveinct  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 10:23:58 AM
Over 6.25 million M-1 carbines were made from 1941-45 alone. It has an unjustly maligned reputation in my opinion. By comparison, there were a total of 5.8 million M-1 Garand rifles made from 1936 through 1957!

I've heard all the remarks - no stopping power, blah blah blah - usually coming from the same people who would praise the MP-5 in 9mm in the same role.

I don't know about anyone else here, but I certainly would not want to be on the receiving end of a .30-cal, 110 gr fmj leaving the muzzle at 1,900 fps - about the same ballistic power as an AK-47 at 100 yards when you think about it.

Here's a rifle that is light as a feather, reliable, kicks like a 10/22 and for under 100 yard engagements is perfectly fine.

Carried by US forces in all theatres from WWII to VietNam and beyond - carried by ARVN forces. The rifle fires from a closed bolt, points easily, in M-2 full auto configuration is more controllable and more accurate than clunky, open bolt sub guns firing pistol rounds with HALF the power and weighing TWICE as much (i.e., Uzi)

Try engaging a 100 yard target with a full auto open bolt Uzi set on semi, then try the same thing with an M-1 Carbine. I think we already know which is the better choice.

You can hump the boonies with a lot of water and a lot of ammo with a Carbine and be very effective for close range firefights. 300 yard rifle? No - it isn't good for that. But - urban combat-door to door, inside a stairwell, shooting across a street into a window - to provide some cover for your fire and maneuever element? Pretty damn accurate, rapid and effective.

Just ask the LAPD SWAT Team. Anyone see the episode on the History Channel about Patty Hearst and the SLA shootout in 1974? Two shooters - one armed with an illegally modified M-1 Carbine and the other with a Commercial, hunting version Browning BAR - not the 20 rd- Bonnie & Clyde gun - the hump back looking 3-5 rd magazine HUNTING rifle in the catalog in .30-06 held down a freakin' battallion strength level response from LEOs for hours with over 5,000 rds expended. (Of course the libtards interviewed on the History channel referred to the M-1 Carbine as if it were the scorn of the free world because of its "firepower" and of course the .30-06 was referred to as "armor piercing" )

Anyway, it's a great little rifle and I am proud to have one - a 9/43 Inland in my safe
vengarr  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 10:25:56 AM
good enough for Audie Murphy is good enough for anyone!
weptek911  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 11:07:22 AM
The Achilles heel is the lack of reliable magazines. The only good magazines are the USGI ones and they are 60 years old now.

Some of us have been begging Larry at CPorducts to make new ones. It's on his list but not a priority.

MRW  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 11:14:34 AM
I have one for all family members, and it is the primary centerfire rifle for my wife and two daughters
GilenusX207  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 11:58:03 AM
Not my first choice, but certainly capable.
drunkintoaster  [Member]
5/24/2008 2:10:56 PM
wouldn't be my first choice but I don't see why it couldn't be used in a SHTF situation
thedoctors308  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 3:01:07 PM
I have one in my tool box.
To be quite honest, I think it is the best self-defense rifle out there, even in stock form, next to an AR15.
JohnRippert  [Member]
5/24/2008 4:25:11 PM
With this in it, yes.
chewbacca  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 4:33:27 PM
If the S really H T F, then any gun is feasible and a welcomed accessory. Regardless, the M1 carbine would be an acceptable choice given the user has ample mags and ammo.
steveinct  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 6:05:15 PM
USGI Mags may be 60 yrs old, but some are half that age and still wrapped in corrosion resistant packaging.

The 15 rounders are best. 30 rounders need an M-2 mag catch to fit correctly and work reliably.
dogbert4-1  [Member]
5/24/2008 7:20:16 PM
ABSOLUTELY.
Cwackers  [Member]
5/24/2008 8:25:37 PM
I've seen new, yes new, Israeli 30rds @ gunshows. They look so nice I might buy some and I don't own a M1. M1 carbines rock. Anyone who says other wise would be smart to remember Green Berets used them ALOT in vietnam.
there you go....
Chris_1522  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 9:07:04 PM
A compact, reasonably accurate, reasonably powerful, fast handling, dead nuts reliable carbine that only weighs 5 pounds?


Uhhhh....YEAH, I'd say it's really good for SHTF.

It's basically a PDW. That's the EXACT role a "SHTF" weapon should have. (well, I guess that depends on the type of S that HTF...if we're talkin' zombies I can see going on the offensive)
ALPHAGHOST  [Team Member]
5/24/2008 10:19:16 PM
as long as you have ammo, hell yea
ARMIKEFMJ  [Member]
5/24/2008 10:21:46 PM
Yes it is..........DEFINITELY!!! Here is my house gun...........
mmsurber  [Member]
5/24/2008 11:31:03 PM
Wow, lots of good advice here. Thanks guys. I posted this with my mom in mind. She's hasn't really been a gun person in recent years, but after reading an article on the oil crisis and all that, she's been more open to it.
timb3  [Team Member]
5/25/2008 1:07:19 AM
Women and kids tend to _love_ M1 Carbines for the reasons mentioned above. It should work perfectly for your mom.

Here's a good article on ammo. Scroll most of the way down the page and read the section on .30 carbine ammo. - The bottom line is that some JHP ammo can hang up and not feed properly in certain M1 carbines, but Jacketed Soft Point (JSP) ammo works just fine and expands well, giving the little carbines both good penetration _and_ good wounding properties. Dr. Roberts found that the Remington JSP was the best round tested. There's also a nice diagram showing the differences in wound profiles between the fmj and jsp projectiles.

Take a look:

ammo.ar15.com/Self_Defense_Ammo_FAQ/index.htm

All that being said, pracice with the fmj's, and save the jsp ammo for defensive use. It's significantly more expensive.
mmsurber  [Member]
5/25/2008 12:08:31 PM
Thanks timb3. How cheap does Remington ammo typically sell for? Impact Guns has 20rds for $45
Miami_JBT  [Team Member]
5/25/2008 12:44:15 PM


I love my Carbine and wish I had more ammo for it.
FourStringSlinger  [Team Member]
5/25/2008 1:15:00 PM

Originally Posted By thedoctors308:
I have one in my tool box.
To be quite honest, I think it is the best self-defense rifle out there, even in stock form, next to an AR15.


They are handy. i don't own one currently but I always liked the ones I shot.
timb3  [Team Member]
5/26/2008 3:58:56 AM

Originally Posted By mmsurber:
Thanks timb3. How cheap does Remington ammo typically sell for? Impact Guns has 20rds for $45



Ouch! You have _got_ to be kidding!!!

It normally comes in 50 round boxes, but even if they mis-labeled it on the website, that's still more than a dollar a round.

To tell ya the truth, the last time I bought the remington jsp stuff was before the economy went totally to shit, so I'll have to check around to see the current average price. - It _has_ always been significantly more expensive than standard fmj stuff though, so I've always kept a bit of it stashed away for "zombie defense" and occasional hunting. 95% of the time I just use FMJ's for plinking and target stuff.

Looks like Midway has it for $41.99 (50 rounds). Link

For target/plinking, they have winchester white box for $24.99 (50rds). Link

They have some less expensive choices though. Here's their .30 carbine ammo page: Link

I've been tempted to try some of the magtech softpoint stuff, 'cause it's so much cheaper, but I've read mixed reviews on it. I think the problem is that the exposed lead portion is larger on them and it might have a tendency to deform and hang up in some carbines.

Also, on the super cheap wolf ammo, I read somewhere that people were having trouble with it. That's not first hand info though, so it might be worth trying. If that stuff has the lacquer on it like a lot of their other ammo, you would need to clean the rifle immediately after shooting it so the stuff won't harden in the chamber and become hard to get out. Lots of people had extraction problems with that stuff in the AR platform because of that. The laquer builds up and the cases start sticking.

One other thought to leave you with. Since you're new to carbines, you probably don't already know... when you're cleaning M1 carbines always make sure to turn the rifle upside down when you're running cleaning patches through the bore. The gas system on these little things is very sensitive about getting solvent/oil in it. If you forget to turn the thing upside down and you run wet patches through it, the gun won't recock the next time you go to shoot it. - Then you'll have to remove the gas piston nut to get the little piston out and run a pipe cleaner up through the gas port to get things working again. This might not sound so bad, but when you consider that a lot of surplus carbines have that nut staked in place... _and_ a special tool is required to remove it... the problem becomes a bit of a pain in the ass. Just try to remember to flip the rifle upside down while you're cleaning the bore though, and you won't have to worry about it.

That brings me to one other thought. It's not a bad idea to get one of those little piston nut wrenches and a couple of other specialty tools that make life a lot easier when you take the thing completely apart. One of the other tools is the bolt disassembly tool and the other one is a "trigger spring tool". If you google these items you'll find them for sale online. You can get along without them, but they do make things easier when you're doing more detailed cleaning, etc.

Have fun!!!
Hector_X  [Member]
5/26/2008 9:42:46 AM

Originally Posted By timb3:
Also, on the super cheap wolf ammo, I read somewhere that people were having trouble with it.


Old Painless reports that it's loaded weak and the steel case doesn't expand like the brass so you get some residue and unburnt powder blown back.
I've got 2 M1 Carbines (check out that funky underfolder stock):

They're not my go-to-guns (got an AR and AK for that) but I keep a lot of ammo and mags on hand just in case I need to equip a friend or relative. They're so close in form and function to the 10/22 it would be really easy to get someone up to speed without dipping into the ammo stockpile.
gks452  [Team Member]
5/26/2008 10:03:25 AM
One of the things I really like about the M1 carbine is the wood stock. It has a far less aggressive look than an AR-15 or AK but within it's range limit is it still a very effective weapon. Straight cases are far easier to reload for than bottle necked so ammo is not a problem for me. But the gun has limited optics and light choices, mags are uncommon and expensive and the guns themselves are generally well used. I want one but can't justify the money when I already have more modern guns.
timb3  [Team Member]
5/27/2008 3:32:26 AM

Originally Posted By Hector_X:

Originally Posted By timb3:
Also, on the super cheap wolf ammo, I read somewhere that people were having trouble with it.


Old Painless reports that it's loaded weak and the steel case doesn't expand like the brass so you get some residue and unburnt powder blown back.
I've got 2 M1 Carbines (check out that funky underfolder stock):
w3.gwis.com/~slomojoe/images/carbines.jpg
They're not my go-to-guns (got an AR and AK for that) but I keep a lot of ammo and mags on hand just in case I need to equip a friend or relative. They're so close in form and function to the 10/22 it would be really easy to get someone up to speed without dipping into the ammo stockpile.


I've seen that type stock at a couple of fun shows over the years. I sure wish I could find one that wasn't priced through the roof.

As for what gks452 was saying about magazine prices... I guess that's all a sort of relative thing. They're a lot more expensive than they _used_ to be, but they're still no more expensive than mags for a lot of other rifles are. It could be worse.
KnightofTheOldeCode  [Team Member]
5/27/2008 4:36:12 AM
I think one can make do with the M1 carbine if need be, The newer designs are much better choices though.
brasidas  [Member]
5/27/2008 8:35:03 AM
From what I have read the M1 with the right ammo has decent terminal performance.

How does it do on body armor? I assume it can penetrate level II, but how about IIIA?
DevL  [Team Member]
5/27/2008 9:44:19 AM
It penetrates IIIA unless it has some sort of special trauma plate insert... they make some specificaly to stop .30 carbine.
Lympago  [Member]
5/27/2008 10:45:53 AM
Even though the ammo's not a common use round with police agencies and the military anymore there's still quite a few in civilians hands. Just the same people aren't going to be passing their ammo out with the shit spread out across the countryside from hitting the fan.
What ammo you have on hand is more likely all you'll have for a while. It's not like that doesn't go in part for other weapons too.
Atleast if you have to use the M1 Carbine against people armed and trying to kill you and survive, their more than likely to have more modern round weapons and once their died what's their is yours.
Sadly enough they probably killed someone else to get them whether police or neighbor, but no one lives forever.

I like the M1 Carbine though and even as I decided it wasn't as good an investment as other rifles for shtf, it's still a nice handling and shooting rifle.
One thing that puts me off though is it's limited modern stock choices. Woods are nice to look at, but I prefer more practical furniture that isn't as moisture and rotting fragile.
Choates synthetic stocks just don't do it for me and the Ramlines aren't what I like in quality. That's still very limited in choices either way.

Another important factor is the iron sights. There not the best to me and there's not really anything to change them to. A hooded front sight like on HK's with a hooded rear giving me a hole within a hole sight picture is much faster on target and more accurate to me too with a good sight post.
This is where I like the Smith DC Vortex and hooded GLFS setup on M14/M1A's so much.
It's certainly allievated by mounting a nice optic like an Aimpoint on an Ultimak handguard rail, but the iron's are still the same if you need to go to them.

Last but not least is the flash supressor issue. The only ones I know of are the boat size butterfly nut ones that clamp on and tighten around the barrel tip and leave you with all the extra weed catching advantage they can give besides less than stellar supression abilities.

In the end it all just makes them a less than best choice compared to other choices and I know for me, I prefer a more powerful catridge too that will punch through move cover and put the hurt on people further out if needs be. This is where I've choosen M1A's for this very purpose and have a fullsize and a Scout to fill in the gaps.
The Scout is quite handy for tighter spaces and with a Smith DC Vortex/hooded GLFS setup it's great in irons and fully capable to mount lots of optics just the same.
Yes, it's heavier for weak people and the round can have too much penetration some tmes, but I've decided to buy another CX4 9mm to fill back in those gaps. The only thing it lacks is the flash supressor, but I have no intention of using it at a time when I'd need one if I have the time and the choice to grab another. That's what M14/M1A's are for.
ARMIKEFMJ  [Member]
5/27/2008 9:21:29 PM
M1 Carbines have been through more sh*t than any modern design rifle. It has proven its worth in the hands of brave American soldiers on every continent. Those who disparage them either haven't shot them or are obsessed with the latest and greatest toys. Any competent person would be well served by a M1 Carbine.
Dawg180  [Member]
5/27/2008 10:28:20 PM
5.5 lbs, 30 round mags, light recoil, compact, and has adequate power to take a life. I would say it can get the job done.
mmsurber  [Member]
5/27/2008 11:56:34 PM
Thanks for the info and advice guys. The store near me has an M1. Gonna have to see into it.
msweet16  [Member]
5/28/2008 12:17:03 AM

Originally Posted By weptek911:
The Achilles heel is the lack of reliable magazines. The only good magazines are the USGI ones and they are 60 years old now.

Some of us have been begging Larry at CPorducts to make new ones. It's on his list but not a priority.



I totally agree. Had a chance to shoot an M2 last year, and the mag was trashed out. I have three collectible M1s, love them all. Not because they're the best at what they do. They're like the slim teenaged girl who wants to act tough but be held softly and cuddled. If you can feed her good stuff, (G.I. mags only) she may just go from cute to bitch in 30 rds. With all their variations and subtleties, they make a great cult collector gun. They are America's War Baby. If Larry was making mags, mine would be in various corners of the rooms..........
timb3  [Team Member]
5/28/2008 12:43:33 AM
Here's some info on M1 carbine magazines. I think there's a more detailed and current one somewhere around the net, but this one is pretty good. The prices have gone up a little from what is listed here.

M1 Carbine Mag FAQ
NateTheShake  [Member]
5/28/2008 12:46:37 PM

Originally Posted By ARMIKEFMJ:
M1 Carbines have been through more sh*t than any modern design rifle. It has proven its worth in the hands of brave American soldiers on every continent. Those who disparage them either haven't shot them or are obsessed with the latest and greatest toys. Any competent person would be well served by a M1 Carbine.


Quoted for truth.

Although I don't own one (yet) I love the M1 Carbine. The cartridge isn't the most powerful, but it's performance is better than most carbine ammo (9mm, 45, etc). The platform is light, rugged, and easy to use. The thing is very easy to shoot and pretty much anyone can handle one with some efficiency with minor training.

I've considered getting one for my mom for the very reasons mentioned here. She's older and not very strong, but she's competant with a firearm (has trigger time behind my G19, G34, P22, and SP101). If things get bad (she lives right outside Baltimore city) I'll have the comfort of knowing she's capable of holding her own against any gremlins that come her way.
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