AR15.Com Archives
 Browning Citori O/U Shotgun Owners
Jarhead_22  [Team Member]
7/7/2002 9:58:33 PM
I did a stupid thing.

I was cleaning my Citori and, with the barrels removed, pulled the trigger. The little latch bar inside the receiver popped back down flush with the bottom of the receiver, and I can't get it to swing back up so I can put the barrels back on.



Has anyone done this before and, if so, how did you fix it?

I downloaded the Citori manual from the Browning website, but got no help there.
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Green_Furniture  [Industry Partner]
7/7/2002 10:23:56 PM
Damn, I did that once too. It's a bitch to get the tab back.

Let me study on it for a moment and I'll remember how I fixed it.
BatMasterson  [Member]
7/7/2002 11:39:11 PM
IIRC, you need to push the lever over like you are opening the shotgun to load or unload the barrels. Then, while holding the lever, push the tab back up.

At least I think that's what I did when this happened to me. :)
Jarhead_22  [Team Member]
7/8/2002 12:52:01 AM

Originally Posted By BatMasterson:
IIRC, you need to push the lever over like you are opening the shotgun to load or unload the barrels. Then, while holding the lever, push the tab back up.


I tried pushing, and it doesn't push easily. The last thing I want to do is force it and break or bend something. If I can't get an answer for sure, I'll call Browning in the morning.
Green_Furniture  [Industry Partner]
7/8/2002 1:06:47 AM
Ditto. That is the way I fixed mine too.
Dano523  [Team Member]
7/8/2002 1:21:09 AM
I do this all the time on my doubles including my Browning, I hate to leave the shotgun cocked for a long periods of time.

To unload the hammers, just push over on the thumb break and push down on the cocking tab. Then just pull the trigger, back the safety on/ off, then pull the trigger again. This will keep the springs from wearing out due to the hammers being stored cocked. All my triggers/hammers are set a 2 1/2LBS and if left cocked too long will loose their paired set.

To re-install the barrels, just push over on the action lever(thumb) and insert the barrels(slides down and forward). Start with the ejectors down on the block, the receiver will move them out to were they need to be. Then add the forearm and open the action, which will cock the barrels. What you are missing is that the barrels do not cock the hammers, the tab on the forearm is what cocks the hammers and will slide on the barrels/action with the hammers uncocked.

Although I own a few Browning, I never get used to swinging them. They remind me of Remington 9600's that swing like a fence posts. Also, the action seems way too high and cumbersome. I guess that over the years I have just grown to dislike the taller actions and have gone to Italian shotguns which have a lower action and more center balanced feel.

Hope this helps.
Jarhead_22  [Team Member]
7/8/2002 2:00:31 AM
So I got a rubber-coated screwdriver and pried that bar up while I held the break over to the right. Good to go.

Thanks.
Dano523  [Team Member]
7/8/2002 3:24:30 AM

Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:
So I got a rubber-coated screwdriver and pried that bar up while I held the break over to the right. Good to go.

Thanks.



Please read my post and leave the screw driver in the tool kit.

The hammers do not need to be cocked to install the barrels and forearm. I know this because before I posted, I broke out one of my browning trap guns and put it together with both hammers down.

Also, if the shotgun is going to sit for half the year in the safe, store it with both hammers uncocked/down. It will save you from having to have the hammer springs replaced every ten years or so.

And, when you yearly clean the receiver (pulling the butt stock), do not use grease on the inertia block, only use oil. I found this out the hard way when shooting double in cold weather. You will get the first barrel, but the grease slows down the inertia block and doesn't allow it to bounce the full distance back to reset the second sear.
Thank god it was only during practice, or I would have wrapped the shotgun around a light post.

P.S. Add long trigger resets to my list of things that I don't like about Browning. I use my Browning when I travel and it takes a while to get used to the trigger return needed (long) to reset the second sear.

Also add barrel Alinement and Browning chokes to the mix of my dislikes list.

I had to send back a Special clay O/U due to the barrels not being set correct. The top shot fine, but the bottom shot to the left of the top barrel. I started off by checking the tubes, but by changing them to Brileys, I only cleaned up the bottom barrel by 3".
As for the rest of my browning tubes, I had a fire sale and replaced them with Brileys to fix the change of impact that was occurring every time I changed tubes.
Jarhead_22  [Team Member]
7/8/2002 3:31:40 PM

Originally Posted By Dano523:
Please read my post and leave the screw driver in the tool kit.

The hammers do not need to be cocked to install the barrels and forearm. I know this because before I posted, I broke out one of my browning trap guns and put it together with both hammers down.


I see now that you're right.

Have you considered aluminum snap caps instead of storing it broken down and letting the hammers fall with nothing to absorb the strike? I was always told that doing that could allow the firing pins to damage the bolt (receiver) face.
Dano523  [Team Member]
7/8/2002 8:42:19 PM
Jarhead_22,
Considering that you may only break out the rifle less than 40 times a year and need to release the hammer. I wouldn't worry about and damage to the firing pins. The idea of anything sitting in the chamber and condensation moisture scares me, I would leave the snap caps to just practicing your swing and follow throw and store the chambers empty.

The one thing that I do different than you might, is that I have hard cases for all of my doubles and store them in the cases oiled. I ran out of room in the safe a long time ago and have removed half the shelves to allow me to stack the cased shotguns.

ECS  [Member]
7/8/2002 8:48:20 PM
Jarhead I have had Browning shotguns and other for years. I always leave them 'cocked'. I have never had a problem doing this. I would not worry about it. The reason its so hard to move that lever it that you are cocking both barrels when you do it. Personally I'd just leave it cocked, belive me it doesn't hurt a thing....ECS
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