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 Cap and Ball pistol shooters, make your own wonder wads and lube...
acmech1  [Member]
11/11/2009 12:39:32 AM
If you do, here is a good tip for you if you use Wonder wads. You can make your own. Here is some info. telling you how, its a great article, I've included some info. in this post from it. It's not my info. but it comes from a gentleman named Gatofeo. http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=123266

Basically call www.Durofelt.com at 501-225-2838 and tell the nice lady you want Item FM1836H, its a 54"x36" piece of 1/8 thick hard wool felt for $30 with free shipping. It is estimated you can get 7700 wads from a piece of material this size. For .31 or .32 caliber, use a 5/16 inch or 7.5 or 8mm wad punch. For .36 caliber use a 3/8 inch or 9.5 or 10mm wad punch. For .44 or .45 caliber revolvers, or .45-caliber rifles, use a .45-caliber or 11mm or 11.25 to 11.5 mm wad punch. For .50 caliber, use a 1/2 inch or 12.5mm wad punch. The author of the original post uses a 7/16's punch for 44-45 caliber wads. Its a good writeup covering his homemade blackpowder bore lube as well. My Uncle shot black powder most of his life and he didn't know this and it would have saved him a lot of money. Again, it isn't my idea, but I ordered some felt and am going to try it. I was inspired to find an alternative to commercial wads since Bass Pro. wants $11 for just 50!! Yes, they are cheaper elsewhere, but they pushed me over the edge since I drove 50 min. to the Bass pro.

Here is a cut and paste of the original authors recipe for blackpowder lube.

MAKING THE BEST LUBRICANT
Measure out:
Mutton tallow 200 grams
Canning paraffin 200 grams
Beeswax 100 grams
Place this amount in a wide mouth, one quart Mason jar. Place the jar into a pot containing four or five inches of boiling water for a double-boiler effect. This is the safest way to melt waxes and greases. Just in case of a fire, keep a box of Baking Powder handy ––- but away from any flame area so you can get to it.
When the ingredients are thoroughly melted, stir well with a clean stick or disposable chopstick.
Remove from heat. Allow the lubricant to cool at room temperature. Hastening cooling by placing in the refrigerator may cause the ingredients to separate. When cool and hardened, screw the cap down tight on the jar and store in a cool, dry place.
What makes this lubricant so good? I believe it's not only the mutton tallow but the inclusion of paraffin, which stiffens the wad somewhat and makes it a more effective fouling scraper.
I've tried other lubricants, commercial and homemade, and still haven't found one that works as well as this recipe. It works equally well in other black powder applications.
It doesn't smell too bad, either. It's different, but it won't stink up the kitchen like melting chassis grease and other noxious ingredients often found in bullet lubricant recipes.

LUBRICATING WADS
For rifle and revolver wads, I use a clean tuna or pet food can with the paper label removed.
Place the can on a cast iron skillet, or in a low pan of boiling water. You may also place the can directly on the burner, if it's kept at low heat and you watch it like a hawk.
Melt 2 Tablespoons of lubricant in the can. Add the wads. I can usually get 100 .36 to .45 caliber wads in a can, the larger ones if I cram them in a bit.
Stir the wads into the lubricant until they're thoroughly soaked. Add more lubricant if it looks like the wads are rather dry. You want a wad that is soaked with lubricant.
No need to squeeze out the excess lubricant, simply remove the can from the heat and allow cooling with the wads and lubricant in it. When cool snap a plastic, pet food cover over the can and store the wads in a cool, dry place.
Now, you have a container to take to the range. And when you run low on wads, simply reheat the can, add more lubricant and wads, and refill it.
Cans may be marked .36 or .44 or whatever on the side with a large felt pen and stacked on top of each other for easy identification.


Again, it isn't my idea or my information, I'm just passing it along to benefit others. Read the original post, there's more info in it there.

Credit for the info goes to:
Gatofeo
Copyright 2009
Remote Utah desert
gatofeo@cut.net
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21BoomCBTENGR  [Team Member]
11/21/2009 10:06:20 AM
TAG!
VaFish  [Member]
11/23/2009 2:02:55 PM
Where do you get mutton tallow?


I know it comes from Sheep. Never seen it in the grocery store.
17Z  [Member]
11/23/2009 6:41:58 PM
I just put in powder, put in bullet, inject the rest of the chamber full of automotive lithium grease from a tube. That or use petroleum jelly.

The wonder wads are called wonder wads because I always wondered why you need them?

Two401Pm  [Team Member]
11/23/2009 7:06:59 PM
I like greasing my balls In a revolver of course,,,,, to prevent chain fires..
jimr  [Member]
11/24/2009 1:28:13 PM
the only thing the grease will do for you is to prevent cross fireing to another cyl, an it works very good for that. verry little if any ( grease ) will be in front of the ball going down the barrel. as for the wad mentinoed above it works very well at preventing a cross fire and a lot less mess. i have used both through the years an i much prefer the wads.
Green_Canoe  [Member]
11/24/2009 2:45:44 PM
Originally Posted By VaFish:
Where do you get mutton tallow?


I know it comes from Sheep. Never seen it in the grocery store.



Dixie Gun Works sells tallow. I don't know if it is mutton though.

The part that bothers me is most sources I've read don't like petroleum based products such as parafin wax used as a BP lube. Most lubes I've seen reported with with good results use beeswax as a carrier for various natural oils such as Jojaba, olive, soy, rapeseed, tallow, etc. They use the 50/50 in BP cartridges rifles and adjust the exact percentages based on the desired hardness of the lube.
CaptHowdy  [Member]
11/25/2009 1:17:30 PM
Wad punch

Tallow


I have one of the drill press wad punches and it works great.
acmech1  [Member]
11/26/2009 10:20:28 PM
Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:
Originally Posted By VaFish:
Where do you get mutton tallow?


I know it comes from Sheep. Never seen it in the grocery store.



Dixie Gun Works sells tallow. I don't know if it is mutton though.

The part that bothers me is most sources I've read don't like petroleum based products such as parafin wax used as a BP lube. Most lubes I've seen reported with with good results use beeswax as a carrier for various natural oils such as Jojaba, olive, soy, rapeseed, tallow, etc. They use the 50/50 in BP cartridges rifles and adjust the exact percentages based on the desired hardness of the lube.


I've read the same thing on petroleum products, but the originator of the article swears that the parafin has no ill effects on the lube, and a LOT of people have been using this lube for a looooong time with no problems. The recipe does come from a 1943 edition of American Rifleman. Tallow from dixie gun works, and bees wax seem to be a consistant ingrediant in most BP lubes though. The ingrediants are common enough for you to experiment with, I was thinking of substituting citronella candle wax for the parafin just to add smell, and one more natural ingrediant. At $3.50 for a 12 oz. tub of mutton tallow, I bought six tubs, don't think I'll use it up in the next 10 years.
If you have any questions, you are free to contact the original poster Gatofeo at gatofeo@cut.net even in his original post he mentions the poor results you'll get from using petroleum products, but he says parafin doesn't produce the same poor results. The best part of the info., is making your own wads. I've already made enough to break even on the $30 I spent on the wool felt at $7.00 per hundred for the wads.
bookertbab  [Team Member]
12/11/2009 2:13:49 PM
Originally Posted By 17Z:
I just put in powder, put in bullet, inject the rest of the chamber full of automotive lithium grease from a tube. That or use petroleum jelly.

The wonder wads are called wonder wads because I always wondered why you need them?



Thats how I used to do it, but instead of lithium grease, I used crisco shortening.
acmech1  [Member]
12/12/2009 8:25:15 AM
Originally Posted By 17Z:
I just put in powder, put in bullet, inject the rest of the chamber full of automotive lithium grease from a tube. That or use petroleum jelly.

The wonder wads are called wonder wads because I always wondered why you need them?



From what I've read, if you plan on shooting more than 50 rnds, the wads help scrap out fouling as they leave the bore and your accuracy won't suffer as it would without the wads. If you don't plan on shooting 100 shots when you go out, don't bother with them. I know for a fact if all you use is lube on top of the ball, after a while fouling will build up enough to affect accuracy. Crisco will be better for you as well in that case, BP is harder to clean if you use petroleum products and they shouldn't be used in BP guns, natural product will work better for you. I have another use for the wads as well. I have started loading my cartridges for my 577/450 martini, and after putting the powder in, I put in a little in a little cotton and then two wads soaked in the bullet lube (they are like hard waxy disks seated under the bullet. You can't or shouldn't use cream of wheat for a filler in bottle neck cartridges so thats why I'm not using it.
wittzo  [Member]
3/8/2010 2:10:47 PM
I use different sized gasket punches for different calibers. The 1/8" thick hard felt is what you want. I compared the remnant price to the regular price, the regular cloth is actually cheaper or the same, depending on what kind of remnant it is.

The .45 gasket wad punch they sell at Track of the Wolf (http://www.trackofthewolf.com/Categories/TableList.aspx?catID=2&subID=37&styleID=126) will give you the best results for a .45. You can buy a cheap set of punches with several sizes for other calibers: 7/16" for .44, 5/8" for .54/.58, 9/16" for 20 gauge, 3/4" for .69 and 12 gauge. Use a punch slightly larger than the caliber you're shooting, so the wad scrapes the fouling from the previous shot into the new powder (burning it upon ignition) and the wadding scrapes the bore to help prevent leading and leaves a smear of lube to catch the fouling from the current shot.

Paraffin is a petroleum product, but it's not the same derivative found in oils, so it doesn't react with BP to make a hard sludge. CLP and Ballistol are mineral oil based, they won't react, either.

After I soak the wads in the lube, I use a pair of bamboo toast tweezers to squeeze out the excess lube, that way it doesn't make them really messy and easier to load.
HellifIknow  [Team Member]
3/8/2010 4:04:47 PM
I've made this lube. It's hardens when cool. Its ROCK hard at 60degrees or less, basically unusable.
Cut out the paraffin wax and use some additional Olive Oil to get it soft enough to use in lower temps.
It is good stuff tho. Cleans up easily and is cheap to make.
acmech1  [Member]
6/10/2010 9:15:55 AM
Originally Posted By HellifIknow:
I've made this lube. It's hardens when cool. Its ROCK hard at 60degrees or less, basically unusable.
Cut out the paraffin wax and use some additional Olive Oil to get it soft enough to use in lower temps.
It is good stuff tho. Cleans up easily and is cheap to make.


I substituted citronelle candle wax for the parafin, and it is hard, but soft enough to work with my fingers. I break off a chunk and squeeze it until soft. With the average summer daily temps in GA around 96, it won't melt away on ya. Depending on where you live you may need to change the formula. When I make the wads, I pour it molten over them, let it soak in, and then place them on a paper plate and let them cool. I've only used the wads and lube when loading my 577/450 martini and I got great results. I pressed the lube into the lube grooves of the bullets with my fingers before sizing, and sized the bullets to .469. After I put the 85 grain powder charge in the case, I put in some polyester fiber fill to take up the airspace, then two wads that I cut to .470 and treated with the formula, and then the bullet. The wads don't go below the shoulder of this long neck case. At 50 yards I was able to put a couple bullets in the same hole but thats not the best part, the wads did a great job of cleaning out the bore from shot to shot and when I got home, I spent more time cleaning my AK that I shot corrosive ammo through. I was using pyrodex also.
Rockdoc  [Team Member]
7/7/2010 6:08:57 PM
I made a batch of lube using the recipe above. Used some in my Star Lubrisizer to lube some .44 Big Lube boolits. Works fine in that application. I will have to make a mould to cast some sticks of lube rather than pouring in hot lube.

Traded brass for a press-mounted .36 punch and got a sheet of felt as listed above. Shot several CAS matches (.36 cal Rem 58's) so far with excellent results, 25-30 rounds per pistol per match. One pass with a moose milk soaked patch and most of the fouling was gone. I do not squeeze the wads, I like them full of lube.
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