AR15.Com Archives
 Is it bad to dry fire a revolver???
atomicjoe23  [Member]
6/18/2010 11:51:44 PM
I have just aquired a Colt Lawman III with a 4/5" barrel in .357 Magnum. . .this is my first handgun (I have shot my Dad's .22 revolver and have experience with the Beretta 92F because of my military background, but I was in the Navy so I only had marginal trigger time behind the Beretta. . .less than once a year) and I was wondering if it was bad for the gun to dry fire it to get used to the trigger before I take it to the range???

I have grown up hearing that it is bad to dry-fire any firearm, but I have also been tole that is not the case. . .

. . .can you guys tell me whether or not it is, or is not bad to dry-fire my revolver and why or why not this is so?

Thanks!!!
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yadayada  [Member]
6/19/2010 12:06:50 AM
Generally, dry firing revolvers with hammer mounted firing pins may cause premature wear of the bushing.

Try snapcaps or spent cases to absorb some impact.

atomicjoe23  [Member]
6/19/2010 12:30:53 AM
Thanks for the input!
NVGdude  [Member]
6/20/2010 4:38:27 AM
My Dan Wesson manual specifically mentioned Dry Firing and recommends it. Don't know about a Colt though.
bradleyswine  [Member]
6/20/2010 9:24:08 PM
Ruger is alright for dry firing.
atomicjoe23  [Member]
6/20/2010 11:37:27 PM
I looked the Colt over and the firing pin isn't mounted on the hammer. . .the hammer strikes a spring loaded firing pin.

I don't know if that's any different from a "hammer mounted firing pin" (I would think it is just from the name. . .) because this is the first revolver I have owned so I have nothing to compare it to, but I would guess it's OK.

I'll be writing Colt to find out. . .and try to get an Owner's Manual just for the heck of it as well.

Thanks!
1903pa  [Team Member]
6/21/2010 10:19:43 AM
I wouldn't dry fire that Colt! There are few revolvers that this is recomended for and I have only read that it is ok for Ruger's but I'll accept it may be so for Dan Wesson's as well.
Jinxsters  [Team Member]
6/21/2010 11:03:44 AM
I always wondered for a single action revolver if it was okay to dry fire. Never done it, but I like practicing with my semi's dry firing. Guess I need to check out with the manufacturer before I f' up my revolver.
hsvhobbit  [Team Member]
6/21/2010 11:23:46 AM
Fwiw I've dryfired my smith revolvers a LOT with zero signs of damage. When I say a lot my mod 14 probably has 300k dry cycles on it to go with maybe 150k of live fire.
novaDAK  [Member]
6/21/2010 7:41:07 PM
It really depends on the make/model/year of manufacture.
atomicjoe23  [Member]
6/21/2010 8:08:59 PM
I'll hold off on dry-firing the Colt for now. . .but FWIW it isn't a SAO it's a SA/DA revolver. . .don't know if that makes a difference or not though.

I'm gonna get a hold of Colt and get their official take on it.
Vermilion  [Team Member]
6/23/2010 12:29:53 PM
Just get some fired cases, pop the primers out and fill the primer cavity with silicone. A lot cheaper than snapcaps.
Porcine83  [Member]
6/25/2010 9:42:27 PM
Originally Posted By hsvhobbit:
Fwiw I've dryfired my smith revolvers a LOT with zero signs of damage. When I say a lot my mod 14 probably has 300k dry cycles on it to go with maybe 150k of live fire.


WOW! I would say that qualifies as a fair test.
hsvhobbit  [Team Member]
6/26/2010 9:17:08 PM
I know it sounds like a BS number but I used to shoot in a league for several years and was practicing 3x a week at the range. I was buying my 148 gr DEWC bullets in 5 K batches usually so it wasn't hard to add up the round count. In general I dry fired a bunch sititng in front of the TV. Nice thing is, that Smith is still sweet shooting. I can't address the Colt longevity but I've never had any issue with any Smith revolver dry firing it.
Jinxsters  [Team Member]
6/28/2010 1:01:03 AM
Originally Posted By hsvhobbit:
I know it sounds like a BS number but I used to shoot in a league for several years and was practicing 3x a week at the range. I was buying my 148 gr DEWC bullets in 5 K batches usually so it wasn't hard to add up the round count. In general I dry fired a bunch sititng in front of the TV. Nice thing is, that Smith is still sweet shooting. I can't address the Colt longevity but I've never had any issue with any Smith revolver dry firing it.


what type of S&W revolver is it? Does it have the firing pin on the hammer?
RiverSwine45  [Member]
6/28/2010 7:44:43 AM
Originally Posted By atomicjoe23:
I have just aquired a Colt Lawman III with a 4/5" barrel in .357 Magnum. . .this is my first handgun (I have shot my Dad's .22 revolver and have experience with the Beretta 92F because of my military background, but I was in the Navy so I only had marginal trigger time behind the Beretta. . .less than once a year) and I was wondering if it was bad for the gun to dry fire it to get used to the trigger before I take it to the range???

I have grown up hearing that it is bad to dry-fire any firearm, but I have also been tole that is not the case. . .

. . .can you guys tell me whether or not it is, or is not bad to dry-fire my revolver and why or why not this is so?

Thanks!!!


DO NOT DRY FIRE A COLT LAWMAN !!!!

I will look for the info and post a link to it, but it will break the firing pin according to what I had read after purchassing my 2" Lawman mark III.


ETA http://pistolsmith.com/colt-revolvers/15365-info-colt-trooper-mk-iii.html

I don't know how to hot link but the second post guy named "dferiswheel" sounds quite knoledgable of them. The Lawman was the fixed sight service style model of the Trooper and I would believe the same hard firing pin is installed in the Lawmans as well. The other forums I frequent have given the same advise. I don't feel that the cost of snapcaps is too much compared to a trip back to Colt for a firing pin.
atomicjoe23  [Member]
6/28/2010 8:52:14 PM
Thank you!
hsvhobbit  [Team Member]
7/2/2010 2:25:16 PM
Smith mod 14-4. I bought it as soon as they reintroduced it. It has the FP mounted on the hammer. I've seen absolutely no signs of peening or other issues. It's never had a hot load through it, target stuff only. I did a careful action job on it early in it's life and it's only gotten smoother since.
MarkFlier  [Member]
7/3/2010 5:02:21 PM
It's okay to dry fire your Lawman. I've dry fired my King Cobra (same frame) thousands of times. When I was competing with a Python, I (and all my competitors who used Smiths) dry-fired thousands of times between matches. I've also heard that the bushing in a gun with a hammer-mounted pin will wear, but I couldn't get it to happen, nor could my closest friends, and we probably had over ten thousand rounds dry-firing.
Jinxsters  [Team Member]
7/3/2010 8:51:23 PM
Originally Posted By MarkFlier:
It's okay to dry fire your Lawman. I've dry fired my King Cobra (same frame) thousands of times. When I was competing with a Python, I (and all my competitors who used Smiths) dry-fired thousands of times between matches. I've also heard that the bushing in a gun with a hammer-mounted pin will wear, but I couldn't get it to happen, nor could my closest friends, and we probably had over ten thousand rounds dry-firing.


Interesting to know.
DavidLewis  [Team Member]
7/4/2010 11:01:40 AM
Originally Posted By atomicjoe23:
I looked the Colt over and the firing pin isn't mounted on the hammer. . .the hammer strikes a spring loaded firing pin.

I don't know if that's any different from a "hammer mounted firing pin" (I would think it is just from the name. . .) because this is the first revolver I have owned so I have nothing to compare it to, but I would guess it's OK.

I'll be writing Colt to find out. . .and try to get an Owner's Manual just for the heck of it as well.

Thanks!


Joe––

You may download a .PDF copy of the appropriate owner's manual directly from Colt: http://www.coltsmfg.com/publications.aspx
Page 16 address dry firing, stating:
You can also dry fire your revolver to get the feel of the trigger action so that you can develop some shooting skills without expending ammunition.


So, Colt says you're good to go with this handgun.

David

danc46  [Team Member]
7/4/2010 11:21:47 AM
FWIW, as far as dry firing an S&W with a hammer mounted firing pin (called a hammer nose), the hammer nose (and rivet) is becoming really hard to find if you break one. You can't get them from Numrich, Brownells, or Midway. And S&W has a notice up on their website that the parts have been discontinued.
So if you're going to dry fire your S&W, snap caps might be a good idea.
fishngrits  [Team Member]
7/4/2010 11:42:05 AM
No. I dry the piss out of my Rugers. If you're concerned about any possible damage, use snap caps. Problem solved.
borderpatrol  [Member]
7/4/2010 11:03:05 PM
Never ever dry fire a .22 rimfire. It will ruin the chamber by forming a burr where the bullets' rim is suppose to seat. I always use snap caps for centerfire revolvers, or at least a spent shell casing. Snap caps are preferred.
atomicjoe23  [Member]
7/6/2010 11:40:36 PM
Thanks for the info guys. . .if Colt says it's OK then I'm gonna hold them to it.

RDak  [Team Member]
7/7/2010 8:27:58 AM
You know, I have always heard for most centerfire revolvers it is ok to dry fire...........yet.............I have always been reluctant to do so.

I do it when putting things back together or when doing a layman's trigger job.......but that is usually all I do.

I don't know why I have this irrational fear but.........there it is.
danc46  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 12:12:13 PM
Originally Posted By RDak:
You know, I have always heard for most centerfire revolvers it is ok to dry fire...........yet.............I have always been reluctant to do so.

I do it when putting things back together or when doing a layman's trigger job.......but that is usually all I do.

I don't know why I have this irrational fear but.........there it is.


Nothing wrong with that. I'm not crazy about doing hundreds of dry fires on a gun. If you can't get the feel of a trigger after a few dry fires, I don't no what to tell you.
Lots of guns get smucked up by someone doing thousands of dry fires and very seldom firing the gun.
Saying dry firing is counter productive will usually start a big argument with a lot of people.
It's their gun if they want to dry fire it.
Just remember, if you break the hammer nose on your S&W K frame, you're gonna be screwed if it's a floating hammer nose. You're not gonna find one and will have to find a new hammer. Probably a cheaply made MIM one from India.

CBR900  [Member]
7/8/2010 2:20:53 PM
Originally Posted By borderpatrol:
Never ever dry fire a .22 rimfire. It will ruin the chamber by forming a burr where the bullets' rim is suppose to seat. I always use snap caps for centerfire revolvers, or at least a spent shell casing. Snap caps are preferred.


True for SOME rimfires, not all. Check the owners manual.

If a centerfire handgun can't safely be dryfired, it is not worth owning (other than for collecting purposes - maybe).

danc46  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 2:45:55 PM
Originally Posted By CBR900:
Originally Posted By borderpatrol:
Never ever dry fire a .22 rimfire. It will ruin the chamber by forming a burr where the bullets' rim is suppose to seat. I always use snap caps for centerfire revolvers, or at least a spent shell casing. Snap caps are preferred.


True for SOME rimfires, not all. Check the owners manual.

If a centerfire handgun can't safely be dryfired, it is not worth owning (other than for collecting purposes - maybe).



I don't think when John Browning developed the 1911 or the High Power (or any of the guns he designed and developed) he had dry firing in mind.

Guns are not designed to be dry fired by ANY MANUFACTURER. You might be able too with little or no damage.
But you do so at your own risk.

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