AR15.Com Archives
 Colt Trooper MkIII?
zainyD  [Member]
6/1/2010 1:14:28 PM
What can you folks tell me about these guns? I just purchased a really nice one with a 4" barrel from the original owner who got it new in 1977. From what I've read the Troopers are built on an extremely strong frame and can take about anything in terms of ammunition. I've also read that they are sometimes considered the poor man's Python. Anybody here have any experience with them? I will post pictures when I get mine, but it may be a while until I get through the transfer, etc. I gave $400 for it and it appears to be barely fired. Fair price?
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dfariswheel  [Member]
6/1/2010 5:15:01 PM
The Mark III is a tank.
It was specifically designed for unlimited use with full-power .357 ammo.
The gun was upgraded as the Mark V, and last as the King Cobra.

Master gunsmith Jerry Kuhnhausen considered it to be the strongest medium frame DA revolver ever made, including the S&W 686 and the Ruger GP-100.
Accuracy and quality of fit and finish are usually a step above other brands.
The blue job is extraordinary, especially compared to todays guns.

The only down sides: You need to use snap caps to dry fire. The firing pin "could" break if you don't , and replacement is a factory job ONLY.
Due to the case hardened, sintered (powdered) steel internal parts, any trigger jobs are limited to installing a parts kit.
NEVER polish the internal parts since this will break through the thin case hardened coating and ruin the parts.
zainyD  [Member]
6/2/2010 9:43:59 AM
Think I did OK on the price? The original owner claims approximately 1500-2000 rounds fired through it. It comes with the original paperwork and grips, but no box. Again, it appears to be in terrific condition.
dfariswheel  [Member]
6/2/2010 3:22:02 PM
Value depends entirely on the actual condition. Having the original box, grips, etc adds to it..
In this case, I think you got a fair deal.
Not_Infringed  [Member]
6/3/2010 12:54:45 AM
For $400 you got a steal! A while back I did some research on my Trooper MKIII and here is the compilation of my notes.
I also have the owners manual in PDF, so if you are interested in that I can email it to. PM if interested. Enjoy your gun!

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-
History
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Colt Trooper was made from 1953 - 1969. Uses an I-frame.
Colt Trooper MKIII was made from 1969 - 1983 (maybe 1984). Uses a J-Frame.
Colt Trooper MKV was made from 1982 - 1985



The Trooper was very popular with police officers in the fifties and sixties. It was a

reasonably priced handgun and was aimed at the law enforcement market. It was also a very strong

revolver. Many are of the opinion that Colt's forgery process and it's lock design made for a

stronger revolver then Smith and Wesson's comprable K-frame revolvers (Model 19, 15, 10 etc.).

The small triangle on the front left side of the trigger guard is actually a "VP" in a triangle.
This is Colt's "Verified Proof" stamp indicating it's passed all inspections.

The "INS" stamp on the left grip frame is a common stamp found on a great many 1960's Colt

revolvers.
This too is an inspector's mark, and it is NOT a government stamp for "Immigration and

Naturalization Service"

The serial number is stamped on the frame just below the barrel and is seen by opening the

cylinder.
It's also stamped on the cylinder crane which can again, be seen with the cylinder open.
Last, Colt stamped the serial number INSIDE the side plate.

A short history of the Colt Trooper.
In 1954 Colt introduced a new series of adjustable sighted holster pistols.
These were the Trooper, and the Colt 357. 357 was both the caliber AND the name of the gun.

The Trooper was basically a Colt Officer's Model Match with a different barrel and less polish.
The frame is the Colt "E & I" frame, same as used on the Official Police, Officer's Model Match,

and Python.

It was first available in .38 Special and .22LR.
It was available with Service grips and hammer, or optionally, Target grips and hammer.
It was made in blue or bright nickel, and the .38 version was available with 4" or 6" barrel.
The .22 version was available only in a 4" version.

The early .38 and all .22LR models had the firing pin mounted on the hammer.
Later .38 and .357 models had the firing pin mounted in the frame.

The 357 Model was to have been Colt's premium revolver, and also was also available in 4" or 6"

barrels.
The 357 had a firing pin mounted in the frame.

Things got confusing at Colt in 1955 when when the super-premium Python was introduced.
People wanting the best bought the Python and law enforcement bought the Trooper.
This left the 357 as odd man out, so in 1961 Colt discontinued the 357 after about 15,000

produced.

To fill in the gap, Colt altered the Trooper frame to a firing pin mounted in the frame like the

357 and Python models, and offered it in .357 Magnum.
The .38 Special Trooper was for a time, specially marked as the "Trooper .38 Special".
Later all Trooper's were marked simply as a "Trooper".

The Trooper series was extremely popular with law enforcement, especially Sheriff's departments.
The .22LR model was often bought as a "trainer' for the .38 or .357 models,

In 1969, Colt discontinued all of the old style mid-frame revolvers except for the Python.
The replacement was a totally different gun, the "J" frame Colt Mark III series.
These Trooper Mark III guns have NOTHING in common with the original Trooper except the Colt

name.

***
A quick note about MKIII's...
Intended to be the first major advancement of Colt’s designs since the beginning of the 20th

century, the MK III series used a new ‘J’ frame and had no parts interchangeability with older

models. The new revolvers were considered groundbreaking as they were the first modern revolver

designs to employ a state of the art transfer-bar lockwork system. This lockwork was not only

more sophisticated, but inherently safer due to its superiority to the older hammer-blocking

designs; the revolver could fire only if the trigger was deliberately pulled completely to the

rear. It also vastly improved on the earlier design in durability, and offered the advantage of

employing sintered iron internal parts rather than expensive forged ones. The springs used in

the Mark III internals were also an improvement, unlike the older flat style they were coiled,

and made entirely of corrosion-resistant stainless steel. The MK III series incorporated a

number of models, several of which were updates of existing designs. Classic models included the

venerable Colt Official Police chambered in .38 Special as the basic/entry-level offering, and

the Trooper in .357 Magnum. New members of the line up included the Lawman, Metropolitan Police,

and Border Patrol.

The Trooper was the premier offering of the new product line, featuring a heavy .357 Magnum

barrel with a solid top rib as well as a shroud which protected the ejection rod. For the first

time the Trooper was offered with an eight inch barrel length, and as the top of the product

line model it boasted a target-grade hammer, target stocks and adjustable sights.
***

The Trooper is often known as a "poor man's Python" due to the Python being really nothing more

than a Trooper or 357 Model with a heavy lugged barrel, a more polished and refined action, and

a super-polished blue job.

In fact, in the late 1960's, the Python was extremely difficult to get due to the Vietnam War,

so some custom gunsmiths welded up the top front of the Trooper frame to match contours, fitted

a Python barrel, and gave the guns a Python level action and blue job.
Many people think they have an early Python, when in fact they have one of these "Troop-On's",

or "Pooper's".

The Old Model Trooper is a very high quality, tough, durable gun. It served lawmen from the

mid-1950's up until it was discontinued, and had a strong following among both lawmen and budget

conscious gun buyers.


***
A quick note about MKV's...
As with the MK III, the Mark V series was an entirely new product line of models which included

Official Police, Lawman, and Trooper variants. The MK V series was based on a slightly smaller

new ‘V’ frame, similar in size to Smith & Wesson’s ‘K’ frame. Changes from the MK III models

were minor and many parts remained identical. Internally, Colt did away with the Sintered iron

MK III lockwork in favor of cast parts, and improved the trigger action with new components and

a shorter hammer fall. These improvements made the MK V triggers smoother, while the diminished

lock times increased accuracy. Exterior modifications included a compact grip frame with rounded

grips; other changes were engineering-based with the goal of simplifying and facilitating

production.

Trooper MKV
Options in general remained the same as they were with the Trooper MKIII models, but the launch

of the MKV's denoted the initiation of a ventilated barrel rib option similar to that of the

Python. The legacy solid rib remained available as well.
***

***
A quick note about J-Frames...
The "J" frame is a deceptively simple design, with large, sturdy parts.
Master gunsmith Jerry Kuhnhausen believed the Colt "J", "V", and "AA" frame guns are the

strongest mid-frame revolvers ever built, due to Colt's forged frames and cylinders, and Colt's

superior heat treating.

About the only "weakness" in this series, is the possibility of a firing pin with too hard a

heat treat. If dry fired, there's a possibility a hard firing pin could break, in which case the

gun MUST be sent back to Colt for a replacement.
This breakage is not that common, but possible.
Factory-only replacement is due to the fact that replacement requires special factory jigs and

support fixtures to remove and re-install the pin, without damaging the frame.

So, to prevent any possible problem, the gun should be dry fired with snap caps in place.
***


The older Colt guns, like the Python, use an action renowned for accuracy. This is due to the

design that forces the cylinder into a tightly locked, perfect alignment with the bore, at the

instant of firing. This design depends on a action in perfect adjustment to work.

The "J" series uses a system similar to all other revolver designs, in which the cylinder is

allowed a slight amount of freedom to rotate at firing. This allows the cylinder to align itself

with the bore.
While not as accurate as the Python, the Trooper III is almost always a very accurate revolver,

due in part to the quality and rifling twist of Colt's barrels.


The best source of mechanical info on the Trooper Mark series, including how to disassemble for

spring replacement, is Jerry Kuhnhausen's book, "The Colt Double Action Revolvers, A Shop

Manual: Vol Two".
This should be a part of every Colt Mark series owner's gear.

By the standards of 1969 the Trooper Mark III was a "budget" gun, but by today's standard it

would be considered a top of the line deluxe model.



––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Serial Numbers for Troopers
source: http://proofhouse.com/colt/index.html (12/5/09)
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-

Trooper Model & 357 Model
––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Year Serial Number
1954 1
1955 7600
1956 8851
1957 9701
1958 12801
1959 17301
1960 21601
1961 27901
1962 32401
1963 36201
1964 39301
1965 43000
1966 50000
1967 59800
1968 67500
1969 80800-84616


Trooper Model
––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Year Serial Number
1953 900351
1954 903251
1955 908801
1956 910901
1957 915701
1958 919301
1959 921601
1960 924151
1961 927901
1962 931101
1963 932501
1964 932801
1965 933201
1966 934301
1967 935551
1968 936451
1969 938001-938520
1969 J1001 Serials shared with Mk III


MK III Series
Trooper
Lawman Metropolitan
Official Police
Officers Model Match
(Border Patrol?)
––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Year Serial Number
1969 J1001.
1970 J8601
1971 J50201 End Officers Match Model
1972 J72201-01001J
1973 J98801-J100000 0160IJ
1974 2880IJ-31999J 42000J
1975 4710IJ-88100J
1976 88101J-99998J L1001-L38900
1977 L38901-L78500
1978 L78501-L99998 1001L
zainyD  [Member]
6/3/2010 10:25:51 AM
Wow, excellent information, thank you! I will PM you with my e-mail address if you wouldn't mind forwarding this information.

I sent off the payment and FFL copy to the seller yesterday. I'm guessing I'll probably have the pistol by the beginning to middle of next week. I'm preparing a bunch of .357mag brass now for an extended range session.

The seller previously had a spring kit installed, but is including the original parts with the gun.
Hb2  [Member]
6/9/2010 8:42:31 PM
I love these guns. It's what I learned to shoot with.

Recently picked one up off GB for $300. The only time I have been bit off GB.

Timing was off and the trigger needs work. It'll cost me another $100 or so to get that done.

So I think you did well, very well.
Hb2  [Member]
6/9/2010 8:42:31 PM
I love these guns. It's what I learned to shoot with.

Recently picked one up off GB for $300. The only time I have been bit off GB.

Timing was off and the trigger needs work. It'll cost me another $100 or so to get that done.

So I think you did well, very well.
zainyD  [Member]
6/10/2010 6:26:31 PM
Well, I picked it up from the gunshop yesterday and she's a beauty! I would say at least 95% on the bluing. The original grips have a chip out of the bottom which I think I can repair. I haven't had a chance to shoot it yet, but I've been handling it a lot getting used to the feel. The seller, who was the original owner, included the receipt from when he bought the gun in 1977 which was neat. The gun dates to that year as well. I will try to get some pictures for everyone's enjoyment soon.

I'm very pleased, especially since I bought it on a whim.
wetidlerjr  [Life Member]
6/11/2010 10:46:02 AM

Originally Posted By zainyD:
What can you folks tell me about these guns? I just purchased a really nice one with a 4" barrel from the original owner who got it new in 1977. From what I've read the Troopers are built on an extremely strong frame and can take about anything in terms of ammunition. I've also read that they are sometimes considered the poor man's Python. Anybody here have any experience with them? I will post pictures when I get mine, but it may be a while until I get through the transfer, etc. I gave $400 for it and it appears to be barely fired. Fair price?

I have one with a 6" barrel in 22LR. Talk about "over built" !
abbynormal56  [Team Member]
7/2/2010 10:46:11 PM
had one. Regret selling it. was my first centerfire revolver. VERY accurate to 100yds with a 4" bbl.
riggsy  [Team Member]
7/2/2010 11:09:53 PM
tag
anekrel  [Team Member]
7/2/2010 11:16:35 PM
Tagging this thread. Great information. I just picked up a 1974 4" Mk III a few days ago for $500.
Cliffyy  [Member]
7/17/2010 5:08:23 PM
One of the best pistols I have shot.Period. Grew up shooting my dads and still talk him into letting me shoot it every once in a while
SlightlySkewed  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 5:27:38 PM
It's a very nice shooting revolver...good score!
DKing  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 5:55:39 PM
My grandfather and each of my uncles bought one when they first came out. It is a nice gun but I prefer my S&W in terms of trigger pull.
Not_Infringed  [Member]
7/19/2010 12:39:32 AM
Originally Posted By DKing:
My grandfather and each of my uncles bought one when they first came out. It is a nice gun but I prefer my S&W in terms of trigger pull.


You gotta be F'n kidding me? The Colt revolvers are renown for their superb trigger pull. Unless the S&W had a gunsmith do some trigger work, the Colt is better. Some people do complain about the way the MKIII trigger feels in DA, complaining that the pull weight ramps up, but I say ba hum bug to them.
wetidlerjr  [Life Member]
7/20/2010 9:08:36 AM

Originally Posted By Not_Infringed:
Originally Posted By DKing:
My grandfather and each of my uncles bought one when they first came out. It is a nice gun but I prefer my S&W in terms of trigger pull.
You gotta be F'n kidding me? The Colt revolvers are renown for their superb trigger pull. Unless the S&W had a gunsmith do some trigger work, the Colt is better. Some people do complain about the way the MKIII trigger feels in DA, complaining that the pull weight ramps up, but I say ba hum bug to them.
Well, the DA trigger on my MK III 22LR was horrible but has been improved by a local smith. I am sure it will get better as I put another 1000 rds. through it. You, of course, can say whatever you want.

johns961  [Member]
7/21/2010 5:29:21 AM
Originally Posted By Not_Infringed:
For $400 you got a steal! A while back I did some research on my Trooper MKIII and here is the compilation of my notes.
I also have the owners manual in PDF, so if you are interested in that I can email it to. PM if interested. Enjoy your gun!

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-
History
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Colt Trooper was made from 1953 - 1969. Uses an I-frame.
Colt Trooper MKIII was made from 1969 - 1983 (maybe 1984). Uses a J-Frame.
Colt Trooper MKV was made from 1982 - 1985



The Trooper was very popular with police officers in the fifties and sixties. It was a

reasonably priced handgun and was aimed at the law enforcement market. It was also a very strong

My Trooper 3 has a serial number of 22502J. When do we think it was made ?
It's a nice shooter. I had it out last Saturday.

John!

revolver. Many are of the opinion that Colt's forgery process and it's lock design made for a

stronger revolver then Smith and Wesson's comprable K-frame revolvers (Model 19, 15, 10 etc.).

The small triangle on the front left side of the trigger guard is actually a "VP" in a triangle.
This is Colt's "Verified Proof" stamp indicating it's passed all inspections.

The "INS" stamp on the left grip frame is a common stamp found on a great many 1960's Colt

revolvers.
This too is an inspector's mark, and it is NOT a government stamp for "Immigration and

Naturalization Service"

The serial number is stamped on the frame just below the barrel and is seen by opening the

cylinder.
It's also stamped on the cylinder crane which can again, be seen with the cylinder open.
Last, Colt stamped the serial number INSIDE the side plate.

A short history of the Colt Trooper.
In 1954 Colt introduced a new series of adjustable sighted holster pistols.
These were the Trooper, and the Colt 357. 357 was both the caliber AND the name of the gun.

The Trooper was basically a Colt Officer's Model Match with a different barrel and less polish.
The frame is the Colt "E & I" frame, same as used on the Official Police, Officer's Model Match,

and Python.

It was first available in .38 Special and .22LR.
It was available with Service grips and hammer, or optionally, Target grips and hammer.
It was made in blue or bright nickel, and the .38 version was available with 4" or 6" barrel.
The .22 version was available only in a 4" version.

The early .38 and all .22LR models had the firing pin mounted on the hammer.
Later .38 and .357 models had the firing pin mounted in the frame.

The 357 Model was to have been Colt's premium revolver, and also was also available in 4" or 6"

barrels.
The 357 had a firing pin mounted in the frame.

Things got confusing at Colt in 1955 when when the super-premium Python was introduced.
People wanting the best bought the Python and law enforcement bought the Trooper.
This left the 357 as odd man out, so in 1961 Colt discontinued the 357 after about 15,000

produced.

To fill in the gap, Colt altered the Trooper frame to a firing pin mounted in the frame like the

357 and Python models, and offered it in .357 Magnum.
The .38 Special Trooper was for a time, specially marked as the "Trooper .38 Special".
Later all Trooper's were marked simply as a "Trooper".

The Trooper series was extremely popular with law enforcement, especially Sheriff's departments.
The .22LR model was often bought as a "trainer' for the .38 or .357 models,

In 1969, Colt discontinued all of the old style mid-frame revolvers except for the Python.
The replacement was a totally different gun, the "J" frame Colt Mark III series.
These Trooper Mark III guns have NOTHING in common with the original Trooper except the Colt

name.

***
A quick note about MKIII's...
Intended to be the first major advancement of Colt’s designs since the beginning of the 20th

century, the MK III series used a new ‘J’ frame and had no parts interchangeability with older

models. The new revolvers were considered groundbreaking as they were the first modern revolver

designs to employ a state of the art transfer-bar lockwork system. This lockwork was not only

more sophisticated, but inherently safer due to its superiority to the older hammer-blocking

designs; the revolver could fire only if the trigger was deliberately pulled completely to the

rear. It also vastly improved on the earlier design in durability, and offered the advantage of

employing sintered iron internal parts rather than expensive forged ones. The springs used in

the Mark III internals were also an improvement, unlike the older flat style they were coiled,

and made entirely of corrosion-resistant stainless steel. The MK III series incorporated a

number of models, several of which were updates of existing designs. Classic models included the

venerable Colt Official Police chambered in .38 Special as the basic/entry-level offering, and

the Trooper in .357 Magnum. New members of the line up included the Lawman, Metropolitan Police,

and Border Patrol.

The Trooper was the premier offering of the new product line, featuring a heavy .357 Magnum

barrel with a solid top rib as well as a shroud which protected the ejection rod. For the first

time the Trooper was offered with an eight inch barrel length, and as the top of the product

line model it boasted a target-grade hammer, target stocks and adjustable sights.
***

The Trooper is often known as a "poor man's Python" due to the Python being really nothing more

than a Trooper or 357 Model with a heavy lugged barrel, a more polished and refined action, and

a super-polished blue job.

In fact, in the late 1960's, the Python was extremely difficult to get due to the Vietnam War,

so some custom gunsmiths welded up the top front of the Trooper frame to match contours, fitted

a Python barrel, and gave the guns a Python level action and blue job.
Many people think they have an early Python, when in fact they have one of these "Troop-On's",

or "Pooper's".

The Old Model Trooper is a very high quality, tough, durable gun. It served lawmen from the

mid-1950's up until it was discontinued, and had a strong following among both lawmen and budget

conscious gun buyers.


***
A quick note about MKV's...
As with the MK III, the Mark V series was an entirely new product line of models which included

Official Police, Lawman, and Trooper variants. The MK V series was based on a slightly smaller

new ‘V’ frame, similar in size to Smith & Wesson’s ‘K’ frame. Changes from the MK III models

were minor and many parts remained identical. Internally, Colt did away with the Sintered iron

MK III lockwork in favor of cast parts, and improved the trigger action with new components and

a shorter hammer fall. These improvements made the MK V triggers smoother, while the diminished

lock times increased accuracy. Exterior modifications included a compact grip frame with rounded

grips; other changes were engineering-based with the goal of simplifying and facilitating

production.

Trooper MKV
Options in general remained the same as they were with the Trooper MKIII models, but the launch

of the MKV's denoted the initiation of a ventilated barrel rib option similar to that of the

Python. The legacy solid rib remained available as well.
***

***
A quick note about J-Frames...
The "J" frame is a deceptively simple design, with large, sturdy parts.
Master gunsmith Jerry Kuhnhausen believed the Colt "J", "V", and "AA" frame guns are the

strongest mid-frame revolvers ever built, due to Colt's forged frames and cylinders, and Colt's

superior heat treating.

About the only "weakness" in this series, is the possibility of a firing pin with too hard a

heat treat. If dry fired, there's a possibility a hard firing pin could break, in which case the

gun MUST be sent back to Colt for a replacement.
This breakage is not that common, but possible.
Factory-only replacement is due to the fact that replacement requires special factory jigs and

support fixtures to remove and re-install the pin, without damaging the frame.

So, to prevent any possible problem, the gun should be dry fired with snap caps in place.
***


The older Colt guns, like the Python, use an action renowned for accuracy. This is due to the

design that forces the cylinder into a tightly locked, perfect alignment with the bore, at the

instant of firing. This design depends on a action in perfect adjustment to work.

The "J" series uses a system similar to all other revolver designs, in which the cylinder is

allowed a slight amount of freedom to rotate at firing. This allows the cylinder to align itself

with the bore.
While not as accurate as the Python, the Trooper III is almost always a very accurate revolver,

due in part to the quality and rifling twist of Colt's barrels.


The best source of mechanical info on the Trooper Mark series, including how to disassemble for

spring replacement, is Jerry Kuhnhausen's book, "The Colt Double Action Revolvers, A Shop

Manual: Vol Two".
This should be a part of every Colt Mark series owner's gear.

By the standards of 1969 the Trooper Mark III was a "budget" gun, but by today's standard it

would be considered a top of the line deluxe model.



––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Serial Numbers for Troopers
source: http://proofhouse.com/colt/index.html (12/5/09)
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-

Trooper Model & 357 Model
––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Year Serial Number
1954 1
1955 7600
1956 8851
1957 9701
1958 12801
1959 17301
1960 21601
1961 27901
1962 32401
1963 36201
1964 39301
1965 43000
1966 50000
1967 59800
1968 67500
1969 80800-84616


Trooper Model
––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Year Serial Number
1953 900351
1954 903251
1955 908801
1956 910901
1957 915701
1958 919301
1959 921601
1960 924151
1961 927901
1962 931101
1963 932501
1964 932801
1965 933201
1966 934301
1967 935551
1968 936451
1969 938001-938520
1969 J1001 Serials shared with Mk III


MK III Series
Trooper
Lawman Metropolitan
Official Police
Officers Model Match
(Border Patrol?)
––––––––––––––––––––––––-
Year Serial Number
1969 J1001.
1970 J8601
1971 J50201 End Officers Match Model
1972 J72201-01001J
1973 J98801-J100000 0160IJ
1974 2880IJ-31999J 42000J
1975 4710IJ-88100J
1976 88101J-99998J L1001-L38900
1977 L38901-L78500
1978 L78501-L99998 1001L


fxntime  [Team Member]
7/21/2010 7:23:05 AM
Good guns, mine would shoot circles around my 686 which was never very accurate to begin with. Was not a fan about the sintered parts but I regret selling it. Still have 4 older Colt DAs though and those are not going anywhere, they are far better then the new revolvers coming out IMHO.
jadams951  [Team Member]
9/3/2010 8:11:50 PM
Grandad gave me this a few years back for Christmas. He said he bought it in about 69 and shot it once only.

dfariswheel  [Member]
9/4/2010 3:58:23 PM
At the time, the Trooper Mark III was Colt's "standard" adjustable sight revolver.
The bluing makes current top of the line guns look sick doesn't it?
Payback99  [Life Member]
9/7/2010 11:52:31 AM
Here's my Trooper.

I bought it used a few years ago in Charleston. Super light trigger, worn grips and looks like it has been drawn quite a bit, pretty sure it used to be a LEOs gun. Shoots tight in .38 Special, a little loose and low in .357 but it is one of my favorite guns bar none. I'm thinking about putting Jordan grips on it, and I definately need a leather rig for it too.





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