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 Redneck hollow points? Man the drill press!
Bittner182  [Member]
12/26/2008 1:46:22 PM
Have you ever seen fmj ammo which has been turned in to hollow points? I have never tried the idea or seen anyone attempt it, but I sure its been done.

I could just imagine some guy rigging up his drill press and going to town on a box of fmjs to save a few bucks.
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Python00  [Team Member]
12/26/2008 2:09:53 PM
I have made some myself, but mostly 22s.
Postal0311  [Life Member]
12/26/2008 2:15:27 PM
Yea, I've also seen guys blow out the center of the round when it fires, leaving a ring of copper jacket and lead in their chamber which prevents the next round from loading.
Bittner182  [Member]
12/26/2008 4:08:19 PM
I can imagine a guy taking a shot with his new hps. Going to look at the paper and asking why his 45 turned into a 9mm hole on the target.

The only bullet I would even try would be a cast round. Nothing but lead removal.
ElevenO  [Member]
12/26/2008 4:26:32 PM
Originally Posted By Bittner182:
Have you ever seen fmj ammo which has been turned in to hollow points? I have never tried the idea or seen anyone attempt it, but I sure its been done.

I could just imagine some guy rigging up his drill press and going to town on a box of fmjs to save a few bucks.






Quite frankly, that idea sounds like an "EPIC FAIL" in the making. If push comes to shove, I can use fmj's for personal defense if no other VIABLE alternative was existing at that particular moment in time.
vengarr  [Team Member]
12/26/2008 4:39:11 PM
not a new idea google dum dum arsenal.
Mister-Z  [Team Member]
12/26/2008 4:57:00 PM
I would be seriously concerned about bullet setback caused by the pressure from the drill on the bullet while already in the case.

This could create overpressure.

Overpressure can create serious problems..................

like, Ka-boom type problems.
river_rat  [Member]
12/26/2008 6:27:18 PM
Originally Posted By Mister-Z:
I would be seriously concerned about bullet setback caused by the pressure from the drill on the bullet while already in the case.

This could create overpressure.

Overpressure can create serious problems..................

like, Ka-boom type problems.


I highly doubt it even if you were using a drill with no point. The drill would not overcome neck tension even on an uncrimped bullet
NVGdude  [Member]
12/26/2008 9:07:09 PM
This is how Gold Dots are made. Speer starts with an TMJ and runs the bullet through a swaging die that punches the hollow point. The gold "dot" is the bit of jacket material that is punched down to the bottom the the HP.

I had a friend who used make his own HP ammo out of mill surp 30-06. Then again, this was northern Africa in the 1950's, and FMJ was the only thing available, so it was more a matter of working with what was available rather than "hey I've got a cool idea"

There is a lot of engineering that goes into a modern HP or SP expanding projectile. I suggest you stick to factory projectiles.
grendelbane  [Member]
12/26/2008 9:22:01 PM
You don't have to drill a hollow point into a FMJ to make it more lethal. Just file a bit of the jacket off one side of the point, to make it a "loftspitz" type projectile.

Such a bullet will be almost as accurate, but much more likely to tumble, and tumble much more quickly, than an unmodified FMJ bullet.

It also avoids the dangers already described of leaving the jacket in the barrel as the core is pushed out.

A round chain saw file works wonders.
grendelbane  [Member]
12/26/2008 9:25:33 PM
Disregard my post. I just noticed I was in the handgun ammunition forum!
mkgunz  [Team Member]
12/27/2008 12:34:13 AM
As a kid I drilled out some of the lead from a semi jacket HP 357 magnum bullet and loaded it. I was careful (thanks to my dad) about drilling too much out and weakening it. It went from a 158 gr to about 110 gr. I had no blow outs and the accuracy was decent. It was a somewhat hot load. I then loaded them with bird shot and sealed them with epoxy. Kind of a Glaser experiment.

I never tried it with a FMJ. I imagine it would help if the bullet had a solid copper base like the one I used. ????

No idea. I was a dumb kid pissing around. Luckily my dad was cool and always encouraged me to experiment but to run it by him first.
Unicorn  [Team Member]
12/27/2008 2:56:49 AM
Dum dum arsenal just snipped the tips off the rifle bullets to make them almost a soft point.

And wasn't there an attachement that would center bullets to drill them into hollowpoints made a few years ago? I remember reading something about it when this question was asked, on I think another forum. Maybe around '01 ish.
ViniVidivici  [Team Member]
12/28/2008 4:59:12 AM
Midway sells a jig to make hollow points in lead bullets. I'm sure it would work for jacketed ones also.

But yeah, not worth the trouble.
wildturl1  [Team Member]
12/29/2008 6:23:19 PM
Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Dum dum arsenal just snipped the tips off the rifle bullets to make them almost a soft point.

And wasn't there an attachement that would center bullets to drill them into hollowpoints made a few years ago? I remember reading something about it when this question was asked, on I think another forum. Maybe around '01 ish.



"Paco's Acu'rizer Tool" perhaps? I know they work on 22's.
Reverend_Deadboy  [Member]
12/31/2008 8:09:08 PM
I actually would prefer FMJ to home made hollowpoints!
HawkCreek  [Team Member]
1/1/2009 8:15:40 PM
Its not for a drill press but "drill your own" HP jigs are already made.

http://www.forsterproducts.com/store/detail.aspx?ID=19
b1ff  [Member]
1/1/2009 10:40:15 PM
Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Dum dum arsenal just snipped the tips off the rifle bullets to make them almost a soft point.

And wasn't there an attachement that would center bullets to drill them into hollowpoints made a few years ago? I remember reading something about it when this question was asked, on I think another forum. Maybe around '01 ish.


Experiments were done at Dumdum Arsenal in India, yes, with softnose ammunition. But the .303 Mk. IV and Mk. V service rounds were true jacketed hollowpoints, manufactured that way, designed by the engineers at Woolwich Arsenal in the UK around 1895.



The Germans complained about it not long before World War I, mainly because their copies of it didn't feed well in a Maxim gun, and got the Brits to go back to an FMJ design, the Mk VII Ball. The JHP ammunition was sold off as surplus, and quickly earned a reputation as a lethal and efficient round for medium sized game like whitetail deer and elk.
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