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 S & W Model 4506
REAPER2502  [Member]
9/28/2007 7:08:21 PM
I am curious about this pistol. My understanding is that it has been out of production since approx. 2001/2002. The local pd carries it, yet many officers claim that the 4506 they are carrying is new. They further claim that the department is continuing to receive new units to replace old/worn out units.

Would S & W make a special run of these for the department, or is it more likely these units are from a quantity maintained since production ceased?

Also, how many different models of this pistol are there? I mean of specifically the 5 inch barreled model. I have seen a myriad of different trigger guards and grips which makes me wonder how many different models exist. Where is a good place to go to obtain a model listing? I tried S & W's website, but it is not listed.


-REAPER2502
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Hawgleg44  [Member]
9/28/2007 11:50:44 PM
For retail sale, yes, the 4506 is out of production. But, S&W will make LE Agency runs of 3rd Gen autos to fill orders. Just like the discontinued 5946 S&W's NYPD still purchases.

There are no different versions of the 4506. But, there are different 45xx versions. S&W used a different model number for every change they made. Every different barrel length, action type, frame material, etc, results in a different model number.

The best way to research these is to go to Barnes and Noble and pick up a copy of the Standard Catalog of S&W. You will learn everything there is to know about S&W's.

Personally, I don't like the feel of teh 4506/1006 size frame. The single stack full size just doesn't fit me. I ended up trading them both away.

Hope this helps.
SkagSig40  [Member]
9/29/2007 3:16:01 AM
The 4506 is an extreemly good gun. Like mentioned above Smith still makes them for police orders only and stated that they will back 3rd Gens for another 20 years. Here is my 4506 made in 2002 IIRC. It has never had a malfunction and is extreemly accurate and being all steel nothing is tougher:
REAPER2502  [Member]
9/29/2007 12:28:37 PM
I have noticed differences in the trigger guards and in the back strap. The difference in the back strap I can contribute to different grips. Some grips are straight up and down and some are curved. Some have a checkered front strap and back strap. Some have vertical lines. I have also noticed that some have squared off trigger guards and some have rounded. Do all of these differences fall under that same model number? Are they just considered progressions of the same design? I must confess a like for this pistol, I just want to learn more about it.


-REAPER2502
10-35  [Member]
9/29/2007 12:52:55 PM
Some of the guns you saw may have been older 645's. The 4506 could be had with flat or curved backstrap grips. There were also 4566's that had shorter barrels and 4516's that were compact models. S&W made a single action 45 that looked somewhat like the 4506 and the Performance Center turned out several custom models using the 45 as a base.

Check google images for 645, 4506, 4516, 4566, and performance center.
REAPER2502  [Member]
9/29/2007 1:54:38 PM
Are these pistols still widely issued? I was under the impression that they were an older and dated model of pistol. All examples I have seen only have a 7 round magazine. Did S & W ever make a higher capacity magazine for it?

Do all models have the decocker/safety? On the models I have handled, they all have a decocker that is not spring loaded like the Beretta decocker. You have to manually press it back up to keep the pistol ready to fire. I also noticed you can "fool" the decocker by manipulating it before the trigger resets. Is that typical of any other pistols?


-REAPER2502
Bigger_Hammer  [Team Member]
9/29/2007 2:01:45 PM
Unless your Beretta is a "G" Decock only model, the Decocking / safety of s third gen S&W works exactly the same. Up to allow the trigger to draw back the hammer (on hammer down) or release the hammer (hammer already back).

To decock your pistol, move the safety decock lever down which will both drop the hammer in a safe mode, and put the pistol onto safe. to return to a ready to fire position, just move the lever up so it is in line with the bbl.

S&W did not make a slide mounted decock only 3rd gen. The S&W Decock only version had a disc cover over the hole in the slide for the safety / decock levers, and instead had a decock lever on the frame similar to a SIG. The 1076 FBI model has this. use Google Images and type 1076 to see some images.

S&W 3rd Gen Autos were & still are GREAT guns! I loved my 1006's (10mm versions) of the 4506 (or some claim the 4506 is the .45 ACP version of the 1006 too!)

BIGGER_HAMMER
Hunterdoggie  [Member]
9/29/2007 2:01:48 PM
I have had 2 06's and I have a 66 right now. They all came with 8 round mags. I did purchase an after market 10 rounder, but it is a POS. I have not heard of or seen S&W make a higher cap mag.
Landric  [Member]
9/29/2007 4:45:24 PM

S&W did not make a slide mounted decock only 3rd gen. The S&W Decock only version had a disc cover over the hole in the slide for the safety / decock levers, and instead had a decock lever on the frame similar to a SIG. The 1076 FBI model has this. use Google Images and type 1076 to see some images.

S&W 3rd Gen Autos were & still are GREAT guns! I loved my 1006's (10mm versions) of the 4506 (or some claim the 4506 is the .45 ACP version of the 1006 too!)


Actually, they did. I have a 4566TSW with a slide-mounted, spring loaded decocker. They were all for LE contract orders, not civilian sales. I have had a regular 4566 and a 4006 in the past that had the same feature.

Some of the older 4506 pistols had a square front trigger guard, the newer ones have round trigger guards. S&W offered both a flat and curved backstrap grip, and Hogue makes rubber grips for the 4506 that are very popular. All the full-size 45xx pistols use 8 round magazines, the compact models use 7 round magazines.

The 45xx series pistols are excellent. They are somewhat dated now, but my experience with them has been great, totally reliable, very accurate, and very tough. I couldn't be happier with my 4566TSW.

ARmory04  [Member]
9/29/2007 7:49:22 PM
Why did S&W stop retail sales of the 4506? Been curious about this.

I'd buy one in a heartbeat if I could find one.
REAPER2502  [Member]
9/29/2007 8:17:13 PM
I notice them on Gunbroker all the time, but prices range from less than $400 to over $800. What accounts for the broad range of prices? I realize that different sights could account for it, but there must be more to it than that.


-REAPER2502
SorryOciffer  [Member]
9/29/2007 11:50:54 PM

Originally Posted By REAPER2502:
I notice them on Gunbroker all the time, but prices range from less than $400 to over $800. What accounts for the broad range of prices? I realize that different sights could account for it, but there must be more to it than that.


-REAPER2502


Greed and an overinflated idea of value. They are great guns and I love them but some people want ridiculous amounts of money for them for their amount of popularity.

S.O.
Ghostface  [Member]
9/30/2007 11:55:22 PM
We used to be issued them until two years ago, I'm so glad we don't have them anymore. They are reliable, built like a tank and pretty accurate. I hate how they felt in my hand and the trigger guard on the newer ones (round type)did not allow you to use them very well with gloves on. When I got out of my car in the winter time I left my right hand glove on the dash.
REAPER2502  [Member]
10/1/2007 7:36:35 PM
I did notice that one the specimens that I have handled, particularly the newer ones, the checkering was so sharp as to almost be painful. I guess the upside to that is that it provides an extremely positive gripping surface if your hands are wet or bloody, or if someone is trying to jerk it out of your hand.

One thing I find kind of strange is the manner of take down. Making sure all the 3 "levers" are compressed and having to rock it backwards in order to get the takedown pin back in. I guess that I am spoiled by the simplicity of my Glock's method of takedown. Heck, even my Beretta seems easier.


-REAPER2502
SkagSig40  [Member]
10/2/2007 1:54:51 AM

Originally Posted By REAPER2502:
I did notice that one the specimens that I have handled, particularly the newer ones, the checkering was so sharp as to almost be painful. I guess the upside to that is that it provides an extremely positive gripping surface if your hands are wet or bloody, or if someone is trying to jerk it out of your hand.

One thing I find kind of strange is the manner of take down. Making sure all the 3 "levers" are compressed and having to rock it backwards in order to get the takedown pin back in. I guess that I am spoiled by the simplicity of my Glock's method of takedown. Heck, even my Beretta seems easier.


-REAPER2502


I do not find the checkering uncomfprtable at all. Take down is not as easy as a Glock or Sig but after you do it a few times it is cake! I can do it blind folded in under 10 seconds.
SorryOciffer  [Member]
10/2/2007 10:17:16 AM
Hogue grips are essential and the take down is damn near the same as the 1911.

S.O.
REAPER2502  [Member]
10/2/2007 10:28:57 AM
Are the Hogue grips wrap around or are they two seperate panels? I could probably get used to the take down.


-REAPER2502
SkagSig40  [Member]
10/2/2007 3:29:53 PM
Hogue grips are seperate panels. Take down is even easier then a 1911....it literally take just a few seconds.
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