AR15.Com Archives
 Glock trigger treatment
ARDestructo  [Member]
11/5/2010 5:15:50 AM EST
Glock trigger job

Has anyone ever done anything like this to their gun? Detail strip it, polish off all the contact points with a dremel and metal polisher? This guy grinds off the part of the striker that catches on the trigger sear to make it have less of a contact point, but that sounds way like something I'm not interested in doing (those permanent mechanical changes seem to have been shown to be counter to good sense in Glocks).

If so, how'd it work for you? I'm consider buying all these replacement parts and performing this and installing them on one of my Glocks to see how it turns out. Just wondering if anyone had any success with it.
Paid Advertisement
--
TimBear  [Member]
11/5/2010 5:40:27 AM EST
A friend did a basic trigger job (think it's called the .25 cent job or something) on mine and it works fantastially well. Smoother more consistent pull and break. No need for aftermarket stuff in a Glock.
ARDestructo  [Member]
11/5/2010 5:43:56 AM EST
Nice.

And I didn't mean get aftermarket stuff, I just meant getting duplicates of all the parts in case this didn't work, so I could just swap back in the originals. I've read about the $0.25 job, and this is a bit more of an intense version of that. Back when I got my first Glock I bought a polished 3.5# connector, and that seemed to be a minor improvement, but I gotta say, the Glock's creepy trigger is its worst feature. Probably the only thing the XD has on the Glock (unless you like grip safeties) is the trigger.
JDFisher7904  [Member]
11/7/2010 6:40:55 AM EST
Glock does not recommend (obviously) polishing of any trigger part. The one thing about the safe action of the Glocks it that they all work together when the trigger is pulled. If you grind off even alittle bit then you have changed the angle of where the connector meets the trigger guard, which in turn could either cause light primer strikes or worse case uncontrollable automatic fire. Just stick with the 3.5lb connector and you should be fine.
Mildew  [Team Member]
11/7/2010 1:47:43 PM EST

I do the $.25 trigger job to different degrees on all of my GLOCKs. I have never cut the striker at a 45* angle but can see how it could do something. That's a $45 part if you want to go back to stock. I don't dislike my trigger pull enough to try it.
Checkmate762  [Member]
11/7/2010 1:50:52 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mildew:
I don't dislike my trigger pull enough to try it.


my thoughts exactly
ARDestructo  [Member]
11/8/2010 7:59:21 AM EST
Hahaha. Yes, I know, I wasn't saying I was going to do that. I was referring more to the polishing of the drop safety, sear, and trigger bar contact points.
JonnyVain  [Team Member]
11/8/2010 8:09:10 AM EST
This. There have been people here who have had problems after doing the .25 trigger job. Same with the Bill Springfield job on their AR's. The 3.5lb is cheap.
Originally Posted By JDFisher7904:
Glock does not recommend (obviously) polishing of any trigger part. The one thing about the safe action of the Glocks it that they all work together when the trigger is pulled. If you grind off even alittle bit then you have changed the angle of where the connector meets the trigger guard, which in turn could either cause light primer strikes or worse case uncontrollable automatic fire. Just stick with the 3.5lb connector and you should be fine.


ARDestructo  [Member]
11/8/2010 10:28:45 AM EST
I don't understand this. Why do people keep coming back to the $0.25 trigger job and grinding things? This isn't what I'm asking about. I'm only talking about polishing off the contact points.
COSteve  [Team Member]
11/8/2010 1:00:21 PM EST

Originally Posted By ARDestructo:
I don't understand this. Why do people keep coming back to ... grinding things?

Because you stated you did in your initial post!!
tothemax  [Team Member]
11/8/2010 1:40:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By ARDestructo:
I don't understand this. Why do people keep coming back to the $0.25 trigger job and grinding things? This isn't what I'm asking about. I'm only talking about polishing off the contact points.


ARDestructo  [Member]
11/8/2010 2:06:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By COSteve:

Originally Posted By ARDestructo:
I don't understand this. Why do people keep coming back to ... grinding things?

Because you stated you did in your initial post!!


This guy grinds off the part of the striker that catches on the trigger sear to make it have less of a contact point, but that sounds way like something I'm not interested in doing (those permanent mechanical changes seem to have been shown to be counter to good sense in Glocks).


The guy in the link I posted ground of his pin. I said that wasn't something I would do...
Mildew  [Team Member]
11/8/2010 2:50:15 PM EST
Some of the parts you have do "grind" before you polish them or you'll end up with rounded surfaces. The part of the trigger bar that engages the firing pin safety where they shear it off, for instance is quite rough. The same goes for the rear rounded part of the trigger bar. I use 2 sharpening stones to remove the nasty while keeping everything square. If I'm wanting it really smooth after the stones, I'll spray-glue sand paper to a piece of glass and take it even finer then finish it up by just touching it with a little rouge on a hard polishing wheel. I'll also hit the metal in the frame rails.

It's easy to get carried away. My current guns have very minimal polishing. Things are just smoothed up a little bit and only where it would happen naturally.
Paid Advertisement
--