AR15.Com Archives
 Painting an AK!
edogg_james4804  [Member]
5/4/2010 9:03:43 PM
Has anyone ever done this? What kind of paint to use? Do I need to bake it in the oven afterwards? Thanks
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SmokeyJ  [Team Member]
5/4/2010 9:07:37 PM
I personally like Brownells Aluma Hyde II.

Tougher than Krylon and still easy to do.

Dura Coat is another option.
Mak  [Team Member]
5/4/2010 9:10:00 PM
Gun-kote or Brownell's baking lacquer
edogg_james4804  [Member]
5/4/2010 9:14:01 PM
Could I use Brake Caliper paint?
sneaky  [Member]
5/4/2010 9:19:07 PM
KG Gun-Kote is easy to use and is hard to get off after bakeing.
mdrauh  [Team Member]
5/4/2010 9:25:15 PM
I used Krylon camo. It was painfully easy, fast, and holds up just okay.

As expected, any hard bumps or scrapes against a rough surface and you'll be chipping paint off.
Finslayer83  [Team Member]
5/4/2010 9:42:48 PM
I painted my TGI74 with some duplicolor gloss engine paint.
My cable and internet is still down due to all the flooding in Nashville, or I would post a pic. Turned out nice and has held up to a few cleanings.

Really makes it a different rifle. I think I have a picture in the plum party thread, pretty recent if I recall.

Whatever you use, take your time and do light coats.

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TheWarhammer  [Member]
5/4/2010 10:02:15 PM
+1 for Alumna Hyde II
Emegbers  [Member]
5/4/2010 10:03:55 PM
+ another 1 for Alumahyde II

Just make sure you get some extra nozzles with it, as the particles in it are rather thick and will clog the nozzle, requiring you to either clean the nozzle or pop on a new one.
Liquidmetal  [Team Member]
5/4/2010 10:09:28 PM
I've had very good results with Alumahyde II as well. Getting extra nozzles is a good piece of advice.
Imaposer2  [Member]
5/4/2010 11:00:18 PM
Originally Posted By edogg_james4804:
Could I use Brake Caliper paint?


Funny that you should ask this, since just today I was thinking the same thing.

Last year I had an idea for doing a little custom work on a Ruger 10/22 that I picked up used. The bluing on the barrel was fine but the paint on the aluminum receiver left a bit to be desired so I decided to repaint it. I used VHT satin black brake caliper paint. When used as directed (baked) it is resistant to many solvents, and as we all know brake fluid removes most paints very quickly, so I though it was worth a try. I sprayed a few light coats on the stripped receiver, let air dry for a few days while busy with work, then baked it in the oven at the prescribed temp and time. I think it turned out looking very nice. It was quick, cheap and available local at an auto parts store. I haven't actually used the gun much since to see how well it holds up, but for this particular application I think it'll work fine.
Unfortunately I don't have any good detail pics of the paint on the gun but here is a couple of the almost completed project gun.

Kinda, sorta a M1 carbine, semi-look-alike






I don't know how well it'll hold up to abuse, scrapes, knocks, etc that an AK might be subjected to. On the 10/22 most of the receiver is protected whereas on an AK most of the metal is exposed. I was happy with the looks of the finish though and think it would look good on an AK. My thoughts today was to get some pieces of steel for testing. I'm going to have some blasted at work, polish some to a surface more closely resembling my AKs surface, sand some with emory, etc. Then paint and bake using the VHT paint. Then I want to do various tests for chip resistance, scratch resistance, abrasion resistance, use various chemicals a gun is likely to come in contact with, do some flex testing... just do whatever I can think to do to see how well it holds up. I also have a can of Aluma-Hyde so I'm going to run a side by side comparison to see which one holds up best. I don't have any Gun-Kote or Duracoat or I'd so the same. If the VHT holds up anywhere near as good as it looks I'd say it's a winner.


Fields_Overseer  [Member]
5/5/2010 3:22:38 PM
friend used duracoat... its not very durable for a few months of curing unless you bake it. but its very hard now.
COMMAND450  [Member]
5/5/2010 3:47:11 PM
molyresin and KG gunkote are what pro builders use, if you want the best. not that some of todays better paints wont work. but if you want something not even carb cleaner will take off, then get one or the other,IMO. some guys may paint a rifle camo,but they want to be able to take it off later. only sand blasting is going to remove gunkote,if its put on right......


http://www.kgcoatings.com/

Finslayer83  [Team Member]
5/5/2010 6:01:02 PM
Dupli color engine paint, can't remember if it was ford or chevy low gloss.

everything was painted besides the BCG





SHONUFF  [Team Member]
5/5/2010 7:51:40 PM
So, if I had to pick between GunKote and Alumahide II, which is the easiest to apply at home, with only a conventional oven?

If one is easier to apply, is there a sacrifice in durability or resistance to solvents?

Would this sacrifice be worth the time/ effort saved?

As far as the oven-bake thing is concerned, my wife is VERY protective of her major appliances. I made the mistake of baking-off some heavily cosmo'd magazines and wood handguards in the toaster oven. My toast tasted like cosmo for a week before I could get a new toaster oven.

If there are lasting fumes involved, I WILL have to buy her a new oven, which means I won't be adding to my gun collection this year. Not a good option.

As long as I'm asking questions.... What is the preferred finish? Semi-gloss or flat?
WTex  [Member]
5/5/2010 8:02:31 PM
Imaposer, very neat conversion of a 10-22, maybe you could add more photos details of making it in a seperate posting.
dskeet  [Team Member]
5/5/2010 8:03:22 PM
Originally Posted By SHONUFF:
So, if I had to pick between GunKote and Alumahide II, which is the easiest to apply at home, with only a conventional oven?

If one is easier to apply, is there a sacrifice in durability or resistance to solvents?

Would this sacrifice be worth the time/ effort saved?

As far as the oven-bake thing is concerned, my wife is VERY protective of her major appliances. I made the mistake of baking-off some heavily cosmo'd magazines and wood handguards in the toaster oven. My toast tasted like cosmo for a week before I could get a new toaster oven.

If there are lasting fumes involved, I WILL have to buy her a new oven, which means I won't be adding to my gun collection this year. Not a good option.

As long as I'm asking questions.... What is the preferred finish? Semi-gloss or flat?


You really shouldn't use the same oven you use for food to do anything with baking gun finishes or powdercoat. I honestly wouldn't even consider it with my oven. Best bet is to get a cheap cheap oven to install in the garage or basement.
SHONUFF  [Team Member]
5/5/2010 8:09:42 PM
Originally Posted By dskeet:
Originally Posted By SHONUFF:
So, if I had to pick between GunKote and Alumahide II, which is the easiest to apply at home, with only a conventional oven?

If one is easier to apply, is there a sacrifice in durability or resistance to solvents?

Would this sacrifice be worth the time/ effort saved?

As far as the oven-bake thing is concerned, my wife is VERY protective of her major appliances. I made the mistake of baking-off some heavily cosmo'd magazines and wood handguards in the toaster oven. My toast tasted like cosmo for a week before I could get a new toaster oven.

If there are lasting fumes involved, I WILL have to buy her a new oven, which means I won't be adding to my gun collection this year. Not a good option.

As long as I'm asking questions.... What is the preferred finish? Semi-gloss or flat?


You really shouldn't use the same oven you use for food to do anything with baking gun finishes or powdercoat. I honestly wouldn't even consider it with my oven. Best bet is to get a cheap cheap oven to install in the garage or basement.



That sounds like good advice. I figured as much. The toaster oven was old and needed replacing anyway. I didn't really eat much of the toast.
Imaposer2  [Member]
5/5/2010 8:33:58 PM
Originally Posted By SHONUFF:
So, if I had to pick between GunKote and Alumahide II, which is the easiest to apply at home, with only a conventional oven?

If one is easier to apply, is there a sacrifice in durability or resistance to solvents?

Would this sacrifice be worth the time/ effort saved?

As far as the oven-bake thing is concerned, my wife is VERY protective of her major appliances. I made the mistake of baking-off some heavily cosmo'd magazines and wood handguards in the toaster oven. My toast tasted like cosmo for a week before I could get a new toaster oven.

If there are lasting fumes involved, I WILL have to buy her a new oven, which means I won't be adding to my gun collection this year. Not a good option.

As long as I'm asking questions.... What is the preferred finish? Semi-gloss or flat?


Yeah I've had it go both ways. Years ago when restoring a motorcycle I baked some small parts in the kitchen oven to cure the paint. God, did I catch hell! But I think the reason it was so bad was that I didn't let the paint air cure long enough for the volatiles to evaporate fully. You could smell it in the house so you can imagine what it did in the oven.
Last year, with the 10/22 posted above, I hung the receiver in my attic (very hot) for a week or two. When I retrieved it I took a close sniff and couldn’t smell anything at all. MrsPoser was to be gone for a few hours so I decided to risk it. I hung in the oven and baked for the recommended time and never smelled a thing, not even when I opened the oven to take it out. Just to be safe I did run the oven through its self cleaning cycle. I was very wary the first time she used the oven but she never noticed a thing, and neither did I.
Of course this was with the VHT brake caliper paint which does air cure to hardness, but needs to be baked to achieve solvent and chemical resistance. I have no ideas what the properties of Gunkote, or any of the other firearms specific coatings, may be in this regard.
I’ve use Aluma-Hyde II and think it’s decent, but between it and Gunkote I’d definitely go Gunkote for durability. As far as I’ve been able to determine about the only thing that beats Gunkote, would maybe be Ceracoat. The advantage to Aluma-Hyde is that is comes in an aerosol can and doesn’t need to be baked, so it is an easier home applied product to use. GunKote needs an airbrush or touch-up gun to apply and needs to be baked. Given the choice I’d still go Gunkote, personally. Much more resistant to solvents.

Imaposer2  [Member]
5/5/2010 9:34:24 PM
Originally Posted By WTex:
Imaposer, very neat conversion of a 10-22, maybe you could add more photos details of making it in a seperate posting.


Thanks, it was a fun project. I actually did two quasi M1 carbine 10/22s. The first one used a walnut USGI surplus M1 carbine stock, and a LOT of work glass bedding and inletting to accept the 10/22 action and barrel. The one pictured above was built using the modified left over stock, a USGI birch upper HG, and a repro barrel band modified to work. Both use Tech-Sights. I actually prefer the first one and just built the second one, posted above, to test an idea. I just posted it because it was the one I used the VHT paint on.

It's doesn't really fit in here, but if you're interested there are quite a few threads in the 10/22 section over on rimfirecentral, about both guns, describing what was done to each.

Here are some pics of the first one:

M1 carbine 10/22 version 1

And here are a few more of the one above:

M1 carbine version 2, sorta

Some of these pics are there just because of questions or discussions that have taken place in other threads elsewhere so they may not all make sense but most do.

Back on target - If anyone is interested, I did take a few more close-up pics of the receiver to better show the texture and appearance of the VHT caliper paint. Excuse the dust that I didn't blow away before taking the pics. The macro on my camera is better than my eyes And don't pay attention to the TG or the Tech-Sight, I only painted the receiver.











Dings  [Member]
5/5/2010 9:49:08 PM
Another for KG coatings.use the 2401F.
Dragonfly228  [Member]
5/5/2010 9:58:57 PM
I used KG gunkote on mine and like it a lot. There is an ARFcom refinishing forum that you should look into.



Imaposer2  [Member]
5/5/2010 10:15:23 PM


Sorry to go off-topic but, Dragonfly, can you tell me who made the lower HG on the first two rifle pics above, and what FH is in the second? Thanks

JakeATW  [Member]
5/5/2010 10:48:47 PM
The gunkote will withstand the heat on the AK barrel and gas tube?
Shrike37  [Member]
5/5/2010 11:00:55 PM
Here is a $8 Krylon rattle can job with no baking. It holds up to CLP and the heat pretty well so far. If it does come off, you can easily spray paint it again.

Imaposer2  [Member]
5/5/2010 11:25:08 PM
Originally Posted By Shrike37:
Here is a $8 Krylon rattle can job with no baking. It holds up to CLP and the heat pretty well so far. If it does come off, you can easily spray paint it again.

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm84/shrike37/DSCF5115.jpg


I've been looking for that picture for a while. I really like the camo job. There is another member that has a very similar looking gun. I believe he goes by TX-Zen, I know he does over at theakforum. Anyway, I've been considering something similar using Gunkote. Did you use stencils or is it all freehand?

Off subject, but can you tell me the origin of those handguards? I've seen them quite a few times but have never known where they were from originally. Also, I've only seen them on "Krinks", so is there a dimensional difference between these and standard AK rifle HGs, or will they fit the rifles as well?

Shrike37  [Member]
5/6/2010 2:44:59 AM
Originally Posted By Imaposer2:
Originally Posted By Shrike37:
Here is a $8 Krylon rattle can job with no baking. It holds up to CLP and the heat pretty well so far. If it does come off, you can easily spray paint it again.

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm84/shrike37/DSCF5115.jpg


I've been looking for that picture for a while. I really like the camo job. There is another member that has a very similar looking gun. I believe he goes by TX-Zen, I know he does over at theakforum. Anyway, I've been considering something similar using Gunkote. Did you use stencils or is it all freehand?

Off subject, but can you tell me the origin of those handguards? I've seen them quite a few times but have never known where they were from originally. Also, I've only seen them on "Krinks", so is there a dimensional difference between these and standard AK rifle HGs, or will they fit the rifles as well?



It was done with Krylon Camouflage Khaki and Brown. I used stencils that I cut out of construction paper.

Those handguards are Kvar USA made ones. They will only fit on a Krink. They are too short for a regular AK.
Andrewsky  [Member]
5/6/2010 5:13:01 AM
Originally Posted By Shrike37:
Originally Posted By Imaposer2:
Originally Posted By Shrike37:
Here is a $8 Krylon rattle can job with no baking. It holds up to CLP and the heat pretty well so far. If it does come off, you can easily spray paint it again.

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm84/shrike37/DSCF5115.jpg


I've been looking for that picture for a while. I really like the camo job. There is another member that has a very similar looking gun. I believe he goes by TX-Zen, I know he does over at theakforum. Anyway, I've been considering something similar using Gunkote. Did you use stencils or is it all freehand?

Off subject, but can you tell me the origin of those handguards? I've seen them quite a few times but have never known where they were from originally. Also, I've only seen them on "Krinks", so is there a dimensional difference between these and standard AK rifle HGs, or will they fit the rifles as well?



It was done with Krylon Camouflage Khaki and Brown. I used stencils that I cut out of construction paper.

Those handguards are Kvar USA made ones. They will only fit on a Krink. They are too short for a regular AK.


Cute little rifle.
Mak  [Team Member]
5/6/2010 11:15:42 AM
Originally Posted By JakeATW:
The gunkote will withstand the heat on the AK barrel and gas tube?


Yes, it is a bake on finish, you have to bake it for it to cure properly

frogwater  [Team Member]
5/6/2010 3:35:22 PM

Originally Posted By Liquidmetal:
I've had very good results with Alumahyde II as well. Getting extra nozzles is a good piece of advice.

This.
edogg_james4804  [Member]
5/6/2010 4:51:26 PM
I think Im going to try High heat engine paint! First off, its alot cheaper, no baking and can withstand temps up to 2000 degrees, plus if it can handle gas, oil ect from engines, Im sure it can handle some gun oil.
Dragonfly228  [Member]
5/6/2010 4:57:54 PM
Originally Posted By JakeATW:
The gunkote will withstand the heat on the AK barrel and gas tube?


KG gunkote is designed to withstand high temps. In fact, it seems to keep the gun cooler. I notice that my guns with KG onthe barrel seem to stay cooler than those that don't. Even my friends in side my side comparisons can attest to this. It's great stuff. I even koted the bolt of my AR and it is rock solid stuff. It goes on really thin too, so it doens't effect funtion. I also typically do the interior glossy silver for easy paper towel wipe downs

I notice that Tan Krylon turns bright pink when subjected to high heat.
Finslayer83  [Team Member]
5/6/2010 6:43:15 PM
It's whats on my TGi-74

Shot once in a downpour, no issues.

Around 700 rounds through it since it's paint job, holding up just fine to three cleanings with water + hoppes #9 + Breakfree LP, no issues.

Best part about it, its less than 10 bucks and you can touch it up if it were to wear off.

I degreased the metal with brake cleaner and let it dry. Took a heat gun on the medium setting and would go over the gun a few times till warm/hot to the touch, then painted.

Dried fast, works great.







dskeet  [Team Member]
5/6/2010 6:57:11 PM
Originally Posted By edogg_james4804:
I think Im going to try High heat engine paint! First off, its alot cheaper, no baking and can withstand temps up to 2000 degrees, plus if it can handle gas, oil ect from engines, Im sure it can handle some gun oil.


It'll handle that stuff just fine, but it won't be near as durable as something like gunkote, alumahyde, etc. It'll chip and scrape off fairly easily. Solvents like Hoppes or similar will probably melt it.

This is one of those "you get what you pay" things.
COMMAND450  [Member]
5/6/2010 8:48:53 PM
brownells sells gunkote in spray cans
FightingHellfish  [Team Member]
5/6/2010 8:53:31 PM
The KG Gunkote is really durable. I used it on all the metal parts of an AK, including a flashhider. The Gunkote is holding up inside the flashhider where it is exposed to direct hot gasses of firing. Good stuff and better than paint. It also does not absorb oils, you can wipe off excess lubricant and the weapons won't pick up any discoloration.

The key to good results is thorough degreasing and complete disassembly. Remove everything that you can, including the back sight and it's leafspring; also the trigger group. You might also want to bake it once after you think it's fully degreased, then degrease it again to get rid of all the oil and cosmolene that cooks out of crevices.
Imaposer2  [Member]
5/6/2010 10:14:55 PM
Well, I know gunkote probably is the best, although I've also heard really good things about Ceracoat, but I don't have a compressor large enough to run a blaster. And, honestly, although I'm sure I could find many uses for a larger compressor if I had one, I've actually managed all of my hobbies for over 45 years without one, so I just can't justify paying $1000 or more for one large enough to do the things needed to even justify buying it. Does that even make sense?

Anyway, in lieu of buying a Billy-bad-ass compressor how does a guy go about getting a rifle abrasive blasted, after a thorough degreasing, prior to spraying the coatings of your choice?

I mean, I actually work around large industrial abrasive blasting equipment all the time. In fact, just yesterday, I took a piece of ornamental cast iron outdoor furniture, that I inherited from my grandmother, to work and had it blasted so I could restore it to its original pristine whiteness for our landscape, but we use Black Beauty media that is much too course for this application. Besides, firearms are verboten on company property.

Ok, so I've had a really long day and I'm exhausted, so excuse me if I'm not making sense in the phrasing of my questions, but am I to assume that everyone here owns a large compressor?
FightingHellfish  [Team Member]
5/7/2010 2:46:04 PM
Originally Posted By Imaposer2:
Well, I know gunkote probably is the best, although I've also heard really good things about Ceracoat, but I don't have a compressor large enough to run a blaster. And, honestly, although I'm sure I could find many uses for a larger compressor if I had one, I've actually managed all of my hobbies for over 45 years without one, so I just can't justify paying $1000 or more for one large enough to do the things needed to even justify buying it. Does that even make sense?

Anyway, in lieu of buying a Billy-bad-ass compressor how does a guy go about getting a rifle abrasive blasted, after a thorough degreasing, prior to spraying the coatings of your choice?

I mean, I actually work around large industrial abrasive blasting equipment all the time. In fact, just yesterday, I took a piece of ornamental cast iron outdoor furniture, that I inherited from my grandmother, to work and had it blasted so I could restore it to its original pristine whiteness for our landscape, but we use Black Beauty media that is much too course for this application. Besides, firearms are verboten on company property.

Ok, so I've had a really long day and I'm exhausted, so excuse me if I'm not making sense in the phrasing of my questions, but am I to assume that everyone here owns a large compressor?


If you're rifle is currently parkerised, it won't be a problem. Parkerising is a good base coat for GunKote.
edogg_james4804  [Member]
5/7/2010 2:58:13 PM
What is parkerizing? Is that the coat of dull black layer on my ak that comes of with sand paper?
GTwannabe  [Member]
5/7/2010 3:05:42 PM
Originally Posted By edogg_james4804:
What is parkerizing? Is that the coat of dull black layer on my ak that comes of with sand paper?


Parkerizing is a light-gray phosphate coating. It's standard on Saiga receivers under the black paint.

Imaposer2  [Member]
5/7/2010 3:25:16 PM
Originally Posted By FightingHellfish:
Originally Posted By Imaposer2:
Well, I know gunkote probably is the best, although I've also heard really good things about Ceracoat, but I don't have a compressor large enough to run a blaster. And, honestly, although I'm sure I could find many uses for a larger compressor if I had one, I've actually managed all of my hobbies for over 45 years without one, so I just can't justify paying $1000 or more for one large enough to do the things needed to even justify buying it. Does that even make sense?

Anyway, in lieu of buying a Billy-bad-ass compressor how does a guy go about getting a rifle abrasive blasted, after a thorough degreasing, prior to spraying the coatings of your choice?

I mean, I actually work around large industrial abrasive blasting equipment all the time. In fact, just yesterday, I took a piece of ornamental cast iron outdoor furniture, that I inherited from my grandmother, to work and had it blasted so I could restore it to its original pristine whiteness for our landscape, but we use Black Beauty media that is much too course for this application. Besides, firearms are verboten on company property.

Ok, so I've had a really long day and I'm exhausted, so excuse me if I'm not making sense in the phrasing of my questions, but am I to assume that everyone here owns a large compressor?


If you're rifle is currently parkerised, it won't be a problem. Parkerising is a good base coat for GunKote.



Oh yeah, I'm familiar with park, and I know that park makes a good base layer for paint since it is a very porous surface with "tooth", providing a good anchor pattern for coatings. In fact I've even considered park'ing prior to painting. Unfortunately getting a really good park job also requires abrasive blasting and all of my AKs are Chinese with blued finishes. I do a lot of industrial coating inspection in my day job so know a bit about the science behind it. Just trying to figure out how to go about it without spending over a grand for a large enough compressor, and blast equip. just for two or three guns.
edogg_james4804  [Member]
5/7/2010 6:00:39 PM
Baking my AK right now! I used a High Heat ceramic header paint that is suppose to handle temps up to 2000 degrees! Looks good so far! I have tow more 30min baking cycles and it will be put back together!!
Imaposer2  [Member]
5/7/2010 7:55:59 PM
Well, I picked up some steel today for my paint test. I don't have a high tech lab so these test will be more or less subjective, but I'm doing this more to satisfy my own curiosity than anything. I'm mainly interested in:

(1) Chemical resistance - will cleaning with commonly used cleaning products or solvents remove it or otherwise damage it

(2) Abrasion resistance - will it wear or rub off easily, Here I mean external wear from general handling, transporting, using, etc, not metal on metal contact areas like BC rails and such.

(3) Scratch or ding resistance - it is an AK so will it hold up to some knocks

(4) Chip, crack, peel resistance - mainly testing it for flexibility after curing since some coatings can become very hard and resistant to abrasion and scratching but become brittle and prone to chipping. AKs flex a lot during firing, they expand with heat, they have rivet heads and other joints that can cause coatings to crack if too brittle so some degree of flexibiity and residual "softness" is desirable. The peeling will really be more about the surface prep. If the substrate has the proper anchor pattern the coating will have something to grab on to and prevent peeling. This is why I'm going to have some pieces blasted first and some not.


Like i said earlier, I used the VHT brake caliper paint on one of my earlier gun projects and have no doubt that it was, and will continue to be, a success in that particular application. Now, I would like to do some testing to see how it stacks up against other stuff. Unfortunately all I have is it and Aluma-Hyde II, but I guess I could pic up some engine enamel and some header paint to add to the test. I really would like to do more gun specific products like Duracoat and KG GunKote but I don't have them available. I guess I could throw in some Krylon since a lot of people do use it on their guns. But then again, we all pretty much know how it'll do, so it'll just serve as a lower durability baseline by which to compare the others.

I have no doubt that Gunkote is an excellent, top tier, product and if doing a coating on a nice firearm I'll go that route but I'm still curious about some of the other "rattle can" alternatives.

Lifted from another AK refinishing thread on another forum:


I was reading Kalashnikov's memoir recently and he states:" I was so proud, looking at the first batcjh of rifles on the rack, all shiny with the fresh black laqer" So in the 1948, in Russia, what substance would be refered to as 'black laquer'?


I would think that many of the more advanced products available on the general marketplace today would perform better than what was available in the late 40's. There is no doubt that some of the firearms specific coatings like gunkote is the absolute best, but that doesn't mean that other products can't give adequate results for certain applications and at least be comparable to what M. K originally used on his.
dskeet  [Team Member]
5/7/2010 8:37:05 PM
Originally Posted By edogg_james4804:
Baking my AK right now! I used a High Heat ceramic header paint that is suppose to handle temps up to 2000 degrees! Looks good so far! I have tow more 30min baking cycles and it will be put back together!!


I used some of that on headers a few years ago. I didn't bake them, but that stuff didn't hold up at all. In a couple months the headers had rusted and the paint was flaking. I d on't believe the 2000 degree claims now, but maybe baking it will make a big difference.

On a rifle it won't be exposed to near the extreme temps as it was on headers, so I doubt heat will be an issue.
edogg_james4804  [Member]
5/7/2010 10:27:26 PM
On the Brownell:Aluma-Hyde webpage, it says to warm the part and the Aluma-hyde to 90 degrees then apply! How do you go about warming the two?
nictra  [Team Member]
5/8/2010 6:59:33 AM
I used /brownells baking lacquer on mine. I used a hair dryer to pre-heat the parts. Prep is the most important part of any refinish job.





TheWarhammer  [Member]
5/8/2010 8:37:29 AM
Originally Posted By SHONUFF:
So, if I had to pick between GunKote and Alumahide II, which is the easiest to apply at home, with only a conventional oven?

If one is easier to apply, is there a sacrifice in durability or resistance to solvents?

Would this sacrifice be worth the time/ effort saved?

As far as the oven-bake thing is concerned, my wife is VERY protective of her major appliances. I made the mistake of baking-off some heavily cosmo'd magazines and wood handguards in the toaster oven. My toast tasted like cosmo for a week before I could get a new toaster oven.

If there are lasting fumes involved, I WILL have to buy her a new oven, which means I won't be adding to my gun collection this year. Not a good option.

As long as I'm asking questions.... What is the preferred finish? Semi-gloss or flat?


Alumna Hyde II is intended to be used without heat curing. Watch a few of the instructional videos on it's use that Brownell's has on their website. The important thing is to be patient and give the paint job plenty of time to cure. Once fully cured, it will be FAR superior to Krylon or engine paint.

Moose-Knuckle  [Member]
5/8/2010 9:39:20 AM
It's an AK....when I wanted to paint my SAR-1 I went and bought some ultra flat black Krylon. Holds up well and gives her some character to boot.
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