AR15.Com Archives
 A good way to clean a major carbon build up on the barrel crown?
MMcfpd  [Life Member]
12/29/2010 9:43:02 PM
What's a good way to clean a carbon build up on the crown without hurting it?

I have a rifle with 3K rounds that, for another reason, I pulled the flash hider off. It had occurred to me that it wasn't quite as accurate lately as I'd come to think of it. And lo and behold there's a bunch of carbon all around the muzzle.

I let it soak in CLP and then gave it a scrub with a regular toothbrush as well as a bronze toothbrush, to little avail. Scraping is something I'm a little hesitant about.

Thoughts?
jpk33  [Team Member]
12/30/2010 5:00:15 PM
Have you tried non-chlorinated brake cleaner? You may have to re-apply and scrub with that tooth brush but it should work.
sed6  [Team Member]
1/12/2011 11:57:18 PM
80 grit sandpaper worked for me.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
mgarr682  [Member]
1/13/2011 3:40:11 PM
Wood manicure sticks work for me.

http://www.walgreens.com/store/c/kiss-manicure-sticks/ID=prod3969450-product

A bit of Hoppes solvent, let it soak a few minutes, then scrape away with the manicure sticks. The wood is much softer than the steel and shouldn't hurt anything.
kaos  [Team Member]
1/17/2011 6:48:05 PM
You could do it the QUIB way.

Stand it muzzle down oh a towel/rag soaked with Odorless Mineral Spirits with som CLP mixed in.

1.) Place rag/towel in pan, stand barrel on end on rag/towel, pour some OMS into the pan, let soak a while.

2.) Go watch T.V. or play with the wife.

3.)Finish cleaning, carry on, as normal.
LockingBlock  [Member]
1/17/2011 9:17:53 PM
Carbon buildup around the muzzle has no influence on accuracy...but the damage you are going to do to the crown will.
sed6  [Team Member]
1/19/2011 12:51:03 AM
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Carbon buildup around the muzzle has no influence on accuracy...but the damage you are going to do to the crown will.


?


kaos  [Team Member]
1/19/2011 3:50:48 AM

Originally Posted By sed6:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Carbon buildup around the muzzle has no influence on accuracy...but the damage you are going to do to the crown will.


?


I agree that damage to the crown is a bad thing.

I don't see damage as being inevitable while removing carbon build-up..

I also believe that carbon build-up, by definition, temporarily changes the shape of the crown, and removing the carbon restores the shape to original.

What I don't know is how much influence the carbon build-up has on the exiting round with the flash hider introducing turbulence paths, but the crown is the first step in the path of the exiting round.

The issue here is the 'safe' removal of the carbon build-up. Is this not true?

Keith_J  [Team Member]
1/19/2011 4:31:31 AM
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.

Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.
Gamma762  [Team Member]
1/19/2011 4:35:53 AM
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.

Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.

Faster than the dedicated carbon removers like Slip2000 carbon cutter? Interesting...
Keith_J  [Team Member]
1/19/2011 4:09:22 PM

Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.

Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.

Faster than the dedicated carbon removers like Slip2000 carbon cutter? Interesting...

Similar product, only PSCSIV can be allowed to dry on steel without fear of corrosion. Also water based, meaning you can soak/scrub, then hit small parts in an ultrasonic bath of water to finish the cleaning. Let dry and oil. I've never had corrosion issues. I even use a water rinse on barrel cleaning, eliminating the need for constant patching. Obviously this water rinse method should not be used on gas guns.
Gregory_K  [Team Member]
1/19/2011 5:41:30 PM
GM Top Engine Cleaner #1050002, has been the stuff I've herd others of using, I never used it myself.
LockingBlock  [Member]
1/22/2011 10:28:20 PM
Originally Posted By kaos:

Originally Posted By sed6:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Carbon buildup around the muzzle has no influence on accuracy...but the damage you are going to do to the crown will.


?


I agree that damage to the crown is a bad thing.

I don't see damage as being inevitable while removing carbon build-up..

I also believe that carbon build-up, by definition, temporarily changes the shape of the crown, and removing the carbon restores the shape to original.

What I don't know is how much influence the carbon build-up has on the exiting round with the flash hider introducing turbulence paths, but the crown is the first step in the path of the exiting round.

The issue here is the 'safe' removal of the carbon build-up. Is this not true?



The portion of the crown that touches the bullet is self limiting in terms of carbon buildup. It has no influence on accuracy.
MMcfpd  [Life Member]
1/30/2011 5:35:46 PM
I did a modified QUIB; i.e., I filled a thread protector (little polymer cap thing) with CLP and let it soak for a week with an incline down toward the muzzle, but not standing on end. The toothbrush was much more effective after that.
ratguner  [Member]
2/2/2011 8:29:49 PM
Go to WalMart and get Liquid Wrench....
soak and soak and soak more......
should take it all down with minimal passes of a bronze brush for the stubborn spots.
Winn  [Team Member]
2/2/2011 8:48:50 PM
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Originally Posted By kaos:
Originally Posted By sed6:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Carbon buildup around the muzzle has no influence on accuracy...but the damage you are going to do to the crown will.

?


I agree that damage to the crown is a bad thing.

I don't see damage as being inevitable while removing carbon build-up..

I also believe that carbon build-up, by definition, temporarily changes the shape of the crown, and removing the carbon restores the shape to original.

What I don't know is how much influence the carbon build-up has on the exiting round with the flash hider introducing turbulence paths, but the crown is the first step in the path of the exiting round.

The issue here is the 'safe' removal of the carbon build-up. Is this not true?


The portion of the crown that touches the bullet is self limiting in terms of carbon buildup. It has no influence on accuracy.


Photo #1

kaos  [Team Member]
2/2/2011 10:00:12 PM

Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Originally Posted By kaos:
Originally Posted By sed6:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Carbon buildup around the muzzle has no influence on accuracy...but the damage you are going to do to the crown will.

?


I agree that damage to the crown is a bad thing.

I don't see damage as being inevitable while removing carbon build-up..

I also believe that carbon build-up, by definition, temporarily changes the shape of the crown, and removing the carbon restores the shape to original.

What I don't know is how much influence the carbon build-up has on the exiting round with the flash hider introducing turbulence paths, but the crown is the first step in the path of the exiting round.

The issue here is the 'safe' removal of the carbon build-up. Is this not true?


The portion of the crown that touches the bullet is self limiting in terms of carbon buildup. It has no influence on accuracy.


Photo #1

I appreciate seeing that link.
I think I learned something useful.

Winn  [Team Member]
2/2/2011 10:05:25 PM



LockingBlock  [Member]
2/4/2011 4:49:35 PM
Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Originally Posted By kaos:
Originally Posted By sed6:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Carbon buildup around the muzzle has no influence on accuracy...but the damage you are going to do to the crown will.

?


I agree that damage to the crown is a bad thing.

I don't see damage as being inevitable while removing carbon build-up..

I also believe that carbon build-up, by definition, temporarily changes the shape of the crown, and removing the carbon restores the shape to original.

What I don't know is how much influence the carbon build-up has on the exiting round with the flash hider introducing turbulence paths, but the crown is the first step in the path of the exiting round.

The issue here is the 'safe' removal of the carbon build-up. Is this not true?


The portion of the crown that touches the bullet is self limiting in terms of carbon buildup. It has no influence on accuracy.


Photo #1



Sooo... what are you saying?

Again, the part of the crown touching the projectile is not suffering from carbon buildup. It is self limiting. If anything, you are creating a false level of temporary clean that will cause inconsistent accuracy compared to the fouled crown once it gets dirty again. This could cause a POI shift in theory...but I doubt it would be measurable.

Functionally, I don't see how anything positive can come from this cleaning...and the likelihood of damage to the crown is high. Additionally, if you are removing and reinstalling a muzzle device, you could get a harmonic shift due to different torque values on reinstall...but again doubt you could measure the zero shift.

All in all, more damage is done cleaning than shooting. If the rifle is still performing...leave it alone.
TurboniumOxide  [Team Member]
2/4/2011 5:00:14 PM
I think he was agreeing by posting the link to the pic.

The crown looks pretty clean even after 10k rounds.
Winn  [Team Member]
2/4/2011 5:11:32 PM
Originally Posted By TurboniumOxide:

I think he was agreeing by posting the link to the pic.

The crown looks pretty clean even after 10k rounds.


This ... ^




Gamma762  [Team Member]
2/4/2011 6:40:44 PM
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.
Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.

Faster than the dedicated carbon removers like Slip2000 carbon cutter? Interesting...

Similar product, only PSCSIV can be allowed to dry on steel without fear of corrosion. Also water based, meaning you can soak/scrub, then hit small parts in an ultrasonic bath of water to finish the cleaning. Let dry and oil. I've never had corrosion issues. I even use a water rinse on barrel cleaning, eliminating the need for constant patching. Obviously this water rinse method should not be used on gas guns.

I picked up a bottle of this on your recommendation, and it was available locally.

Left a barrel soaking overnight with the crown sitting in a little plastic cup of the solvent. This morning pulled it out and let it drip off, then pushed the crown into a paper towel and twisted gently. About 90% of the carbon came off in about 1 second, a few more twists took off about 5% more. Rather than scrub on it I just put the remainder back in to soak, I have no doubt it will come off easily this evening.

So +1 and thumbs up on ProShot Copper Solvent IV. Very little odor, and if it does a job on copper too I just found a new bore cleaner.

I'm going to soak an old flash suppressor tonight and see if it loosens up the shale-like buildup on the inside.

Any recommendation to remove a fine patina of rust/oxidation from CMV steel? Need to strip out the oxidation layer at the bottom of some laser engraving, just want bare steel left.
LockingBlock  [Member]
2/7/2011 2:09:34 AM
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.
Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.

Faster than the dedicated carbon removers like Slip2000 carbon cutter? Interesting...

Similar product, only PSCSIV can be allowed to dry on steel without fear of corrosion. Also water based, meaning you can soak/scrub, then hit small parts in an ultrasonic bath of water to finish the cleaning. Let dry and oil. I've never had corrosion issues. I even use a water rinse on barrel cleaning, eliminating the need for constant patching. Obviously this water rinse method should not be used on gas guns.

I picked up a bottle of this on your recommendation, and it was available locally.

Left a barrel soaking overnight with the crown sitting in a little plastic cup of the solvent. This morning pulled it out and let it drip off, then pushed the crown into a paper towel and twisted gently. About 90% of the carbon came off in about 1 second, a few more twists took off about 5% more. Rather than scrub on it I just put the remainder back in to soak, I have no doubt it will come off easily this evening.

So +1 and thumbs up on ProShot Copper Solvent IV. Very little odor, and if it does a job on copper too I just found a new bore cleaner.

I'm going to soak an old flash suppressor tonight and see if it loosens up the shale-like buildup on the inside.

Any recommendation to remove a fine patina of rust/oxidation from CMV steel? Need to strip out the oxidation layer at the bottom of some laser engraving, just want bare steel left.


Is that cleaner chrome safe?
heavyduty  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 9:06:21 AM
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.
Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.

Faster than the dedicated carbon removers like Slip2000 carbon cutter? Interesting...

Similar product, only PSCSIV can be allowed to dry on steel without fear of corrosion. Also water based, meaning you can soak/scrub, then hit small parts in an ultrasonic bath of water to finish the cleaning. Let dry and oil. I've never had corrosion issues. I even use a water rinse on barrel cleaning, eliminating the need for constant patching. Obviously this water rinse method should not be used on gas guns.

I picked up a bottle of this on your recommendation, and it was available locally.

Left a barrel soaking overnight with the crown sitting in a little plastic cup of the solvent. This morning pulled it out and let it drip off, then pushed the crown into a paper towel and twisted gently. About 90% of the carbon came off in about 1 second, a few more twists took off about 5% more. Rather than scrub on it I just put the remainder back in to soak, I have no doubt it will come off easily this evening.

So +1 and thumbs up on ProShot Copper Solvent IV. Very little odor, and if it does a job on copper too I just found a new bore cleaner.

I'm going to soak an old flash suppressor tonight and see if it loosens up the shale-like buildup on the inside.

Any recommendation to remove a fine patina of rust/oxidation from CMV steel? Need to strip out the oxidation layer at the bottom of some laser engraving, just want bare steel left.


Is that cleaner chrome safe?


That was my first thought, too. So many copper solvents aren't.
Keith_J  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 9:04:44 PM

Originally Posted By heavyduty:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.
Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.

Faster than the dedicated carbon removers like Slip2000 carbon cutter? Interesting...

Similar product, only PSCSIV can be allowed to dry on steel without fear of corrosion. Also water based, meaning you can soak/scrub, then hit small parts in an ultrasonic bath of water to finish the cleaning. Let dry and oil. I've never had corrosion issues. I even use a water rinse on barrel cleaning, eliminating the need for constant patching. Obviously this water rinse method should not be used on gas guns.

I picked up a bottle of this on your recommendation, and it was available locally.

Left a barrel soaking overnight with the crown sitting in a little plastic cup of the solvent. This morning pulled it out and let it drip off, then pushed the crown into a paper towel and twisted gently. About 90% of the carbon came off in about 1 second, a few more twists took off about 5% more. Rather than scrub on it I just put the remainder back in to soak, I have no doubt it will come off easily this evening.

So +1 and thumbs up on ProShot Copper Solvent IV. Very little odor, and if it does a job on copper too I just found a new bore cleaner.

I'm going to soak an old flash suppressor tonight and see if it loosens up the shale-like buildup on the inside.

Any recommendation to remove a fine patina of rust/oxidation from CMV steel? Need to strip out the oxidation layer at the bottom of some laser engraving, just want bare steel left.


Is that cleaner chrome safe?


That was my first thought, too. So many copper solvents aren't.

I've soaked many hard chrome plated items in it without an issue. Decorative chrome? Most have copper strike plating under the chrome and since this is a copper solvent, it could cause problems.

Bores are all hard chrome plated. Use Pro Shot Copper Solvent as it won't touch it. But keep it away from your Harleys as most of that is decorative chrome plating.
Gregory_K  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 12:05:22 PM
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By heavyduty:
Originally Posted By LockingBlock:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there. I even use it on engine rebuilds as it cleans pistons, combustion chambers and valves better than any solvent on the market.
Yes, still a fine bore cleaner.

Faster than the dedicated carbon removers like Slip2000 carbon cutter? Interesting...

Similar product, only PSCSIV can be allowed to dry on steel without fear of corrosion. Also water based, meaning you can soak/scrub, then hit small parts in an ultrasonic bath of water to finish the cleaning. Let dry and oil. I've never had corrosion issues. I even use a water rinse on barrel cleaning, eliminating the need for constant patching. Obviously this water rinse method should not be used on gas guns.

I picked up a bottle of this on your recommendation, and it was available locally.

Left a barrel soaking overnight with the crown sitting in a little plastic cup of the solvent. This morning pulled it out and let it drip off, then pushed the crown into a paper towel and twisted gently. About 90% of the carbon came off in about 1 second, a few more twists took off about 5% more. Rather than scrub on it I just put the remainder back in to soak, I have no doubt it will come off easily this evening.

So +1 and thumbs up on ProShot Copper Solvent IV. Very little odor, and if it does a job on copper too I just found a new bore cleaner.

I'm going to soak an old flash suppressor tonight and see if it loosens up the shale-like buildup on the inside.

Any recommendation to remove a fine patina of rust/oxidation from CMV steel? Need to strip out the oxidation layer at the bottom of some laser engraving, just want bare steel left.


Is that cleaner chrome safe?


That was my first thought, too. So many copper solvents aren't.

I've soaked many hard chrome plated items in it without an issue. Decorative chrome? Most have copper strike plating under the chrome and since this is a copper solvent, it could cause problems.

Bores are all hard chrome plated. Use Pro Shot Copper Solvent as it won't touch it. But keep it away from your Harleys as most of that is decorative chrome plating.


this.

Decorative chrome and nickle plating you have to watch thecleaners.

Hard chrome or industrial chrome, is safe for just about all cleaners.
Full-Auto  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 6:25:48 PM
To remove heavy carbon built up on the crown and flash hider area from heavy suppressor use I fill a small tupperware container with Slip 2000 Carbon Killer, lean the rifle against an object muzzle down in the container (liquid just covers flash hider) for 20 minutes and all the carbon is gone when you take it out.

Full-Auto
wpsj44  [Member]
3/10/2011 11:27:14 PM
Try Kroil. Generously apply it to the crown (or whereever). Let it sit for a day or so ... reapply as needed. careful ... Kroil will migrate. After a day or so of the applications of Kroil, use some scotch-brite and gently scrub. I can assure you the carbon will come off. Good luck, friend.
Gamma762  [Team Member]
3/11/2011 12:13:59 AM
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there.(snip)

(snip)
I'm going to soak an old flash suppressor tonight and see if it loosens up the shale-like buildup on the inside.
(snip)

As a follow up, I did soak an old surplus 3 prong flash suppressor, where the whole inside was a block of carbon with a ~.2245 hole down the middle.

Same as before, using a twisted up paper towel, after a day it removed almost all of the carbon. Rather than scrub I just put it back in to soak, next day another couple of twists of a paper towel and it was clean, down to the parkerizing.
Gregory_K  [Team Member]
3/11/2011 1:02:43 PM
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV. It also cuts carbon faster than anything else out there.(snip)

(snip)
I'm going to soak an old flash suppressor tonight and see if it loosens up the shale-like buildup on the inside.
(snip)

As a follow up, I did soak an old surplus 3 prong flash suppressor, where the whole inside was a block of carbon with a ~.2245 hole down the middle.

Same as before, using a twisted up paper towel, after a day it removed almost all of the carbon. Rather than scrub I just put it back in to soak, next day another couple of twists of a paper towel and it was clean, down to the parkerizing.


Good to know.
Gunner5607  [Member]
3/16/2011 9:44:10 AM
No advertising - Roadhawk
Gregory_K  [Team Member]
3/16/2011 11:53:48 AM
Originally Posted By Gunner5607:
Try soaking in this.

http://boretech.com/products/carbonremover.shtml


So, what's your position in Telford PA?