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 Can you cut down a standard AR-15 CAR buffer to use an AR-15 CAR buffer tube on an AR-10?
SpacemanSpiff  [Member]
5/7/2008 6:11:08 PM
To me it seems the only difference is the CAR-10 buffer tube is about 0.75" longer than the CAR-15 buffer tube.

cutting down the buffer would give the necessary travel length in an AR-10, so you could use an AR-15 buffer and buffer tube directly on an AR-10.

anyone tried this?

only negative I can see is your buffer would be pretty light. You could add tungsten weights to replace the steel ones to bring it back up a bit.

I run very light buffers in my AR-15s and have no problems....

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bjwar10  [Member]
5/7/2008 9:40:58 PM

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:
To me it seems the only difference is the CAR-10 buffer tube is about 0.75" longer than the CAR-15 buffer tube.

cutting down the buffer would give the necessary travel length in an AR-10, so you could use an AR-15 buffer and buffer tube directly on an AR-10.

anyone tried this?

only negative I can see is your buffer would be pretty light. You could add tungsten weights to replace the steel ones to bring it back up a bit.

I run very light buffers in my AR-15s and have no problems....



I'm guessing the lack of weight would be an issue...Slash what are the facts?
ssdhouston  [Member]
5/7/2008 10:34:22 PM
A month ago, I cut down a standard AR15 rifle length buffer to AR10 length for the first and last time. I had bought some tungsten weights from Slash to customize the weight.

After I cut the length, I had to ream the inner diameter of the buffer to get the plug back in.

It's not worth the trouble. Just buy a CAR buffer from Slash--it's like getting a work of art to hide away in your rifle.
SpacemanSpiff  [Member]
5/7/2008 10:54:18 PM

Originally Posted By ssdhouston:
A month ago, I cut down a standard AR15 rifle length buffer to AR10 length for the first and last time. I had bought some tungsten weights from Slash to customize the weight.

After I cut the length, I had to ream the inner diameter of the buffer to get the plug back in.

It's not worth the trouble. Just buy a CAR buffer from Slash--it's like getting a work of art to hide away in your rifle.


Ahh just did it. Wasnt much trouble really.

Shortened it 0.670", put a chamfer on the ID and used my shop press to push the plug back in, lubed with a bit of oil, went in no problems. Re-drilled for the roll pin, hammered roll pin back in, drank a celebratory Budweiser.

Buffer looks good to go.

Had to cut an AR-15 carbine recoil spring by 4 coils to use with this combo, otherwise the compressed length would have caused the spring to bottom out before the buffer contacted the buffer tube.

I will be testing it soon. I see no reason why it won't work as is.

TaylorWSO  [Life Member]
5/8/2008 1:14:50 AM
I cut down all my Rifle buffers to make AR10 shortened buffers and add tungsten weights to make them exta heavy. You can cut down a aluminum car buffer but you need one made from steel IMO, your giving up too much needed weight using the AL body.
SpacemanSpiff  [Member]
5/8/2008 11:29:16 AM

Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
I cut down all my Rifle buffers to make AR10 shortened buffers and add tungsten weights to make them exta heavy. You can cut down a aluminum car buffer but you need one made from steel IMO, your giving up too much needed weight using the AL body.


I guess I am not fully convinced that the extra weight in the buffer is necessary, the bolt carrier on the AR-10 is heavy enough on its own in my opinion.

Like I said, I run lightened bolt carriers and buffers in my AR-15s and have never had a problem, and I dont see anything vastly different that would make the AR-10 not work. In full auto I could see there being a big problem with the increased cyclic rate and bolt bounce issues, but in semi, I just dont see the problem.

I'll try it and report the results here either way.
TaylorWSO  [Life Member]
5/8/2008 12:19:33 PM

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:

Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
I cut down all my Rifle buffers to make AR10 shortened buffers and add tungsten weights to make them exta heavy. You can cut down a aluminum car buffer but you need one made from steel IMO, your giving up too much needed weight using the AL body.


I guess I am not fully convinced that the extra weight in the buffer is necessary, the bolt carrier on the AR-10 is heavy enough on its own in my opinion.

Like I said, I run lightened bolt carriers and buffers in my AR-15s and have never had a problem, and I dont see anything vastly different that would make the AR-10 not work. In full auto I could see there being a big problem with the increased cyclic rate and bolt bounce issues, but in semi, I just dont see the problem.

I'll try it and report the results here either way.


I think you'll find the heavier is better, especially if reloading. As posted many times before the AR10 can be overgassed, and it needs the heavy buffers if you want to keep early extraction down/pressure signs. I have already tried it and it doesn't work the carriers will slam to the back causing undo wear IMO

I would only do it if i had a adjustable gas tube to tune the gas with the lightened buffer.

AR10 is not the same as the AR15, good luck

CBR900  [Member]
5/8/2008 5:47:01 PM

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:

Originally Posted By ssdhouston:
A month ago, I cut down a standard AR15 rifle length buffer to AR10 length for the first and last time. I had bought some tungsten weights from Slash to customize the weight.

After I cut the length, I had to ream the inner diameter of the buffer to get the plug back in.

It's not worth the trouble. Just buy a CAR buffer from Slash--it's like getting a work of art to hide away in your rifle.


Ahh just did it. Wasnt much trouble really.

Shortened it 0.670", put a chamfer on the ID and used my shop press to push the plug back in, lubed with a bit of oil, went in no problems. Re-drilled for the roll pin, hammered roll pin back in, drank a celebratory Budweiser.

Buffer looks good to go.

Had to cut an AR-15 carbine recoil spring by 4 coils to use with this combo, otherwise the compressed length would have caused the spring to bottom out before the buffer contacted the buffer tube.

I will be testing it soon. I see no reason why it won't work as is.



Did same. Its works. Not too hard.
ssdhouston  [Member]
5/8/2008 10:06:56 PM
It's all easy if you have the right tools. I was using very basic handtools, and it took longer than I expected. I had to grind inside tube diameter using a split dowel rod with sandpaper chucked in a drill.

Next time I'd just buy a buffer and spend my time loading more ammo instead.


I do think a heavier buffer is helpful. I tried the Tubb CWS which does slow every thing down, but always seem to drop the thing in the dirt if I break open my rifle. A heavier buffer is a better solution IMHO.
SpacemanSpiff  [Member]
5/13/2008 12:04:24 PM
Well I have put about 150 rounds through the rifle since I posted this.

I have a 16" upper and a 20" upper, and it runs fine with the buffer as is, but TaylorWSO was right, the AR-10 is over gassed with full power ammo, especially my 16" upper. The secondary recoil makes it feel like I am shooting an AK or something, just not very smooth.

I am going to add an adjustable gas block to my rifle, or convert my gas block to being adjustable as I would rather do that than add weight to it.

I'll post the results when I have made the modifications
shrikefan  [Team Member]
5/13/2008 10:12:32 PM

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:
To me it seems the only difference is the CAR-10 buffer tube is about 0.75" longer than the CAR-15 buffer tube.

cutting down the buffer would give the necessary travel length in an AR-10, so you could use an AR-15 buffer and buffer tube directly on an AR-10.

anyone tried this?


only negative I can see is your buffer would be pretty light. You could add tungsten weights to replace the steel ones to bring it back up a bit.

I run very light buffers in my AR-15s and have no problems....



DPMS - which I understand the factory buffer is too light.
DnPRK  [Team Member]
5/13/2008 10:23:34 PM

Originally Posted By shrikefan:

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:
To me it seems the only difference is the CAR-10 buffer tube is about 0.75" longer than the CAR-15 buffer tube.

cutting down the buffer would give the necessary travel length in an AR-10, so you could use an AR-15 buffer and buffer tube directly on an AR-10.

anyone tried this?


only negative I can see is your buffer would be pretty light. You could add tungsten weights to replace the steel ones to bring it back up a bit.

I run very light buffers in my AR-15s and have no problems....



DPMS - which I understand the factory buffer is too light.

Isn't Knight's buffer a plastic plug that weighs 0.5 oz?
SpacemanSpiff  [Member]
5/16/2008 11:46:56 AM

Originally Posted By DnPRK:

Originally Posted By shrikefan:

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:
To me it seems the only difference is the CAR-10 buffer tube is about 0.75" longer than the CAR-15 buffer tube.

cutting down the buffer would give the necessary travel length in an AR-10, so you could use an AR-15 buffer and buffer tube directly on an AR-10.

anyone tried this?


only negative I can see is your buffer would be pretty light. You could add tungsten weights to replace the steel ones to bring it back up a bit.

I run very light buffers in my AR-15s and have no problems....



DPMS - which I understand the factory buffer is too light.

Isn't Knight's buffer a plastic plug that weighs 0.5 oz?


yes.
TaylorWSO  [Life Member]
5/16/2008 12:39:30 PM

Originally Posted By DnPRK:

Originally Posted By shrikefan:

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:
To me it seems the only difference is the CAR-10 buffer tube is about 0.75" longer than the CAR-15 buffer tube.

cutting down the buffer would give the necessary travel length in an AR-10, so you could use an AR-15 buffer and buffer tube directly on an AR-10.

anyone tried this?


only negative I can see is your buffer would be pretty light. You could add tungsten weights to replace the steel ones to bring it back up a bit.

I run very light buffers in my AR-15s and have no problems....



DPMS - which I understand the factory buffer is too light.

Isn't Knight's buffer a plastic plug that weighs 0.5 oz?


I think their gas systems are "tuned" on the lighter side for a suppresor. Semi 308's in general seem to be overgassed and need the heavier buffer.

If you want to add the lighter buffer in a already built rifle, you will probably need to tune down the gas.

Slash  [Dealer]
5/16/2008 1:02:10 PM

Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:

Originally Posted By DnPRK:

Originally Posted By shrikefan:

Originally Posted By SpacemanSpiff:
To me it seems the only difference is the CAR-10 buffer tube is about 0.75" longer than the CAR-15 buffer tube.

cutting down the buffer would give the necessary travel length in an AR-10, so you could use an AR-15 buffer and buffer tube directly on an AR-10.

anyone tried this?


only negative I can see is your buffer would be pretty light. You could add tungsten weights to replace the steel ones to bring it back up a bit.

I run very light buffers in my AR-15s and have no problems....



DPMS - which I understand the factory buffer is too light.

Isn't Knight's buffer a plastic plug that weighs 0.5 oz?


I think their gas systems are "tuned" on the lighter side for a suppresor. Semi 308's in general seem to be overgassed and need the heavier buffer.

If you want to add the lighter buffer in a already built rifle, you will probably need to tune down the gas.



Different springs too.

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