AR15.Com Archives
 Stainless Barrel break in
blinddog1  [Member]
5/7/2006 10:50:33 PM

What is the procedure? I am waiting on a 24" heavy stainless Wilson Match Barrel. It is going on the Varment rifle I am building what do i need to do to break this barrel in? Is it the same as a Chrome Moly Barrel? slow fire ten rounds then run a couple patches through? or is there something else i need to do?
Any suggestions will be helpful
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Valkyrie  [Member]
5/7/2006 10:57:43 PM

Originally Posted By blinddog1:
What is the procedure? I am waiting on a 24" heavy stainless Wilson Match Barrel. It is going on the Varment rifle I am building what do i need to do to break this barrel in? Is it the same as a Chrome Moly Barrel? slow fire ten rounds then run a couple patches through? or is there something else i need to do?
Any suggestions will be helpful



I have a RRA NM upper with the Wilson SS 1/8 barrel. I was all keyed up on the proper break-in method and I got suggestions from across the board. Here is what I did. Went to the range and put 50 rounds down it brought it home and cleaned it up with Hoppesfor the carbon fouling followed by Butch's Bore Shine. It shot better than I could anyway. Break in is just a function of final lapping of the bore which for a match barrel is already done. YMMV.
blinddog1  [Member]
5/7/2006 11:20:07 PM
Thank you for the fast responce that was close to what I was thinking anyway. Figured that ten rounds and then cleaning was going to be a pain at the place I go to shoot, fifty sounds much more likely.
ToeBall  [Member]
5/8/2006 2:41:22 AM
The fastest cause of wear to rifling is cleaning. If you run patches through till your barrel is completely shiney every time you're litterally polishing off your rifling. I just put some CLP on a bore snake (no metal shaft to rub inside the barrel) and pull it throuh once or twice after every shooting session. Been doing that with all my guns (except the ones that I shoot corrosive ammo though, those get windex washed) and no problems with any. A few specs of dirt in the barrel isn't going to hurt accuracy but not scrubbing it out every time will definatley get you more life (assuming throat errosion is acceptable). There is no change that happens to the barrel during "break-in" that cleaning could possibly help with.
A_Free_Man  [Member]
5/8/2006 10:31:34 AM
(1) Install new barrel.

(2) Clean barrel (new barrels often have grit from machining and other material)

(3) Go to range, shoot 300-500 rounds.

(4) Go home, clean rifle.

(5) Done! It's broke in.
persimmonpete  [Team Member]
5/8/2006 3:32:09 PM
Just don't say all this around any of the Sniper forums or others like that!

Those folks will go to war at the drop of a hat over barrel break in procedures. Shoot one round, clean, shoot one round, clean...ad nauseum.

Several very noted precision barrel makers have reported that all this todo about barrel break in was started by a barrel maker who figured out that he could increase sales by suggesting his customers perform that shoot-clean, shoot-clean cycle. Wear 'em out faster and they'll be back for another barrel sooner! I've been involved in precision rifle shooting since the middle 1960's and no one ever suggested such procedures until the late 1980's. Maybe metallurgy is not what it used to be.

Anyway, the advice here is correct. Shoot it a bunch, then clean it. Done.
FALARAK  [Team Member]
5/8/2006 5:54:37 PM

Originally Posted By ToeBall:
The fastest cause of wear to rifling is cleaning.



Cleaning? No. Improper cleaning techniques and tools? Yes.


If you run patches through till your barrel is completely shiney every time you're litterally polishing off your rifling.


Facts/data to support this? Or is this just supposition?


I just put some CLP on a bore snake (no metal shaft to rub inside the barrel) and pull it throuh once or twice after every shooting session. Been doing that with all my guns (except the ones that I shoot corrosive ammo though, those get windex washed) and no problems with any. A few specs of dirt in the barrel isn't going to hurt accuracy but not scrubbing it out every time will definatley get you more life (assuming throat errosion is acceptable).


No question, there is nothing wrong with your cleaning regimen. However, you will build up copper over time, and while this wont have a substantial impact on a 1.5MOA barrel shooting 3MOA ammo.... it will degrade the accuracy potential, which is why precision rifle shooters clean.... correctly.


There is no change that happens to the barrel during "break-in" that cleaning could possibly help with.


cough *bullshit* cough.
FALARAK  [Team Member]
5/8/2006 6:05:16 PM
For a generic chrome lined or chrome moly barrel.... I agree, shoot as much as you want, then clean.

For a stainless match barrel, that I am going to put a quality mount, scope, and shoot match grade or handloads from.... and demand .5 or better accuracy from, you had better bet that I am going to invest in the barrel at the beginning. Following a break-in procedure has *ZERO* impact on any kind of premature barrel wear, and anyone that says so is talking out of their ass.

I only clean with nylon coated 1 piece rods (Dewey, Bore Tech). I fire 1 roun, then clean, for 10 rounds. Then every 5 rounds after that for 50 rounds. When I am shooting for groups, I rarely go 20 rounds without putting a patch down the bore..... talk to some serious match or benchrest shooters, or people who turn barrels for a living.... not the peanut gallery here. Sure, there is not a 100% industry consensus.... but there sure aint some kind of barrel manufacturers consipiracy like some wanna believe.

I use a bore guide, which eliminates any chance of nicking/wearing the throat. I wet a patch with sweets/shooters choice/Butches, and push it through the bore. Then a wet bronze brush, then another wet patch, then two dry patches, then back to shooting. That takes like 3 minutes.... and doesnt hurt a thing.

Do I have empirical evidence that this helps the barrel be a shooter over it's life? No.

But I have had enough industry builders, and match shooters, advise me on this to ignore it. At worst, it doesnt hurt a thing.... To each their own.
ToeBall  [Member]
5/8/2006 6:13:46 PM

Cleaning? No. Improper cleaning techniques and tools? Yes.


Well, perhaps you can enlighten us as to "proper techniques and tools.


Facts/data to support this? Or is this just supposition?


This is actual information told to me by several barrel manufacturers, including Obermyer. A few match barrel manufacturers actually go so far as to void your warranty for breaking in or over cleaning a barrel for this reason. I personally haven't experimented, but I can immagine that a smooth bore rifle barrel dosen't do well firing standard ammo over a few hundred yards.


No question, there is nothing wrong with your cleaning regimen. However, you will build up copper over time, and while this wont have a substantial impact on a 1.5MOA barrel shooting 3MOA ammo.... it will degrade the accuracy potential, which is why precision rifle shooters clean.... correctly.


Actually, my AR-15 shoots sub 2" groups at 200 with standard M855 ammo. That's with a Wilson 16" fluted stainless heavy barrel with a 1 in 8 twist. We'll see how much accuracy degrades over time from copper buildup. So far I've got a few thousand rounds through some of my other firearms with no noticable degredation of acuracy, but mabey it just takes a while to build up copper. I would suppose, personally, that blasting 14,000 psi of hot gas and abrasive carbons behind the bullet traveling through the bore would limit how much copper could build up, as copper is a rather soft metal.


cough *bullshit* cough.


Well, I'm, again, quoting information told to me by more than one barrel manufacturer. I would assume they know what they're talking about, but if you have data showing something different I would really like to see/hear it. I'm here to learn as much as anyone so please explain it for me.

As I was told, the only way breaking in a barrel affects it is if the machinist who cut the chamber or crown did it too quickly resulting in burrs in the rifling. Those get shot out by round count though. Other than that there is no change that occurs. The metal is effectivley finished as a manufacturing process. It dosen't temper from being heat cycled, it definatley dosen't harden. It is possible to smooth it out which is polishing, but this is only a factor on cheap barrels cut too quickly.
FALARAK  [Team Member]
5/8/2006 7:11:28 PM

Originally Posted By ToeBall:

Cleaning? No. Improper cleaning techniques and tools? Yes.


Well, perhaps you can enlighten us as to "proper techniques and tools.



Funny - I thought I did? I explained my tools, and tecnique. Was I talking too fast for you?




Facts/data to support this? Or is this just supposition?


This is actual information told to me by several barrel manufacturers, including Obermyer. A few match barrel manufacturers actually go so far as to void your warranty for breaking in or over cleaning a barrel for this reason. I personally haven't experimented, but I can immagine that a smooth bore rifle barrel dosen't do well firing standard ammo over a few hundred yards.



I see. So pushing a patch slowly through a barrel just wears the shit out, while shooting a tight jacket of copper out 3250FPS doesnt hurt it at all huh? Cleaning barrels wih the proper tools and tecniques dont cause wear. If you are talking steel uncoated rods, non-use of bore guides, steel brushes, pushing dirty carbon back and forth, abraisives, etc... you might have a point. But you didnt say anything about that.



No question, there is nothing wrong with your cleaning regimen. However, you will build up copper over time, and while this wont have a substantial impact on a 1.5MOA barrel shooting 3MOA ammo.... it will degrade the accuracy potential, which is why precision rifle shooters clean.... correctly.


Actually, my AR-15 shoots sub 2" groups at 200 with standard M855 ammo.



Is that right? Mind if I call total bullshit? Because this proves that you dont know the proper way to measure groups. I am sorry, but your AR-15 doesnt shoot SUB-MOA, in 5 shots groups, group to groups, all day long. You might get the *occasional* 3 shot group at 200 that is sub-MOA.... but not an average of 5 shot groupings. I'm sorry, but M855 just isnt built to that standard of accuracy.... the powder charges arent that consistent, the bullet jackets arent that consistent, and they arent loaded for match accuracy. So, I'm sorry.... but that statement was just full of shit.


That's with a Wilson 16" fluted stainless heavy barrel with a 1 in 8 twist. We'll see how much accuracy degrades over time from copper buildup.


Or made up results.


So far I've got a few thousand rounds through some of my other firearms with no noticable degredation of acuracy, but mabey it just takes a while to build up copper. I would suppose, personally, that blasting 14,000 psi of hot gas and abrasive carbons behind the bullet traveling through the bore would limit how much copper could build up, as copper is a rather soft metal.


I have a barrel that rapidly degrades from .75MOA to 1.5MOA due to copper buildup.... but then, it isnt a match barrel, and wasnt lapped at the factory. Without a doubt, I dont see the same level of copper buildup in my match barrels.



cough *bullshit* cough.


Well, I'm, again, quoting information told to me by more than one barrel manufacturer. I would assume they know what they're talking about, but if you have data showing something different I would really like to see/hear it. I'm here to learn as much as anyone so please explain it for me.



I wont bother gathering ALL the industry data... but here is a little for you:

Kreiger:

www.kriegerbarrels.com/RapidCat/catalog/pagetemplate.cfm?template=/RapidCat/common/viewPage.cfm&PageId=2558&CompanyId=1246

Pac-Nor

www.pac-nor.com/care/

Douglas

www.benchrest.com/douglas/palma.html

Compass Lake

www.compasslake.com/instructions.htm

Gale McMillan started that stuff about breakin being false way back when..... and maintains that stance, but he is one of the *only* ones I know about that dont support the theory of break-in.

www.6mmbr.com/GailMcMbreakin.html


David Tubb is one of the worlds top shooters:

www.snipercountry.com/InReviews/DavidTubbsFinalFinish.asp

www.zediker.com/articles/break_in.pdf

www.outdoors.net/site/features/feature.aspx+Forum+Firearms+ArticleCode+1759+V+N+SearchTerm+



As I was told, the only way breaking in a barrel affects it is if the machinist who cut the chamber or crown did it too quickly resulting in burrs in the rifling. Those get shot out by round count though. Other than that there is no change that occurs. The metal is effectivley finished as a manufacturing process. It dosen't temper from being heat cycled, it definatley dosen't harden. It is possible to smooth it out which is polishing, but this is only a factor on cheap barrels cut too quickly.


You might be right. But like I said.... I'll got with the majority of the industry and shooters..... and from what I can see, they break them in, and they clean them often.
ToeBall  [Member]
5/8/2006 7:40:00 PM

Funny - I thought I did? I explained my tools, and tecnique. Was I talking too fast for you?


Woops, just didn't pay attention to the following post. Sorry, I'll read it in a bit.

Got done reading it. I don't understand what all those different chemical treatments do for your barrel. I read in a few of the links you provided to not mix the different chemicals. Since they're all chemically active to be able to break up carbon or copper, they're bound to be active to at least slightly affect the material of the barrel itself. Usually stainless is an alloy of iron, chromium, nickle, and sometimes molybdenum and carbons. The percentages of each will determine how reactive it is, how well it holds up to heat, and how hard it is. Unfortunatley, the harder it is and the better it hold up to heat, the more chemically active it is. I'm not sure as to the specific alloys used for barrel manufacture, but I'm guessing they aren't as worried about innertnes as they are with durability so they probably lean to the austenic grades. Now given that, the chemicals that react with copper and carbon to break it up can affect the alloys as well. Again, this is supposition, but it may be interesting to test in a lab environment some day.


I see. So pushing a patch slowly through a barrel just wears the shit out, while shooting a tight jacket of copper out 3250FPS doesnt hurt it at all huh? Cleaning barrels wih the proper tools and tecniques dont cause wear. If you are talking steel uncoated rods, non-use of bore guides, steel brushes, pushing dirty carbon back and forth, abraisives, etc... you might have a point. But you didnt say anything about that.


Last time I checked, cotton, paper, and most other patch material has a grain, this is shown to cause scratching. It's not a matter of how much damage a bore brush or patch causes but how often it is done. I'm also curious about how the different chemicals affect the alloys used in barrel manufacture.


Is that right? Mind if I call total bullshit? Because this proves that you dont know the proper way to measure groups. I am sorry, but your AR-15 doesnt shoot SUB-MOA, in 5 shots groups, group to groups, all day long. You might get the *occasional* 3 shot group at 200 that is sub-MOA.... but not an average of 5 shot groupings. I'm sorry, but M855 just isnt built to that standard of accuracy.... the powder charges arent that consistent, the bullet jackets arent that consistent, and they arent loaded for match accuracy. So, I'm sorry.... but that statement was just full of shit.


Mabey I am inacurate or mabey I'm lucky. Here's a 200 yard group shot 2 weekends ago (went jet skiing last weekend so I didn't shoot). I'm sorry, I have no way to prove that it was at 200 yards but for the sake of argument, take my word for it, ok? Anyway, I've shot several AR's that shoot sub MOA groups with reasonable ammo, sometimes Black Hills 55 grain, sometimes, other stuff.




Or made up results.


I'm trying to be civilized and mabey learn something here, no reason to be a prick.


I have a barrel that rapidly degrades from .75MOA to 1.5MOA due to copper buildup.... but then, it isnt a match barrel, and wasnt lapped at the factory. Without a doubt, I dont see the same level of copper buildup in my match barrels.


What's the barrel's make and specs? I wonder if it has anything to do with some match barrels having shallower rifling than regular production barrels. Also, I suppose if a barrel is lapped in different manners, or throated differently it could affect how much copper it abbraids. Also how many rounds does it have through it. If there's more throat errosion it could foul faster too.


I wont bother gathering ALL the industry data... but here is a little for you:

Kreiger:

www.kriegerbarrels.com/RapidCat/catalog/pagetemplate.cfm?template=/RapidCat/common/viewPage.cfm&PageId=2558&CompanyId=1246



According to this site, the only part that gets affected during break in is the troat area, but since you get throat errosion from just shooting, and since your equipment protects the throat I don't see that scrubbing the barrel actually makes a difference here. Mabey I'm missing something though.


Pac-Nor

www.pac-nor.com/care/



They give a recomended procedure but don't even explain why. Just shoot and clean and don't leave amonia based cleaners in too long. I wonder, again if there could be a chemical reaction between the barrel's alloy and the cleaning solvents.


Douglas

www.benchrest.com/douglas/palma.html



They say to clean every 15 rounds or so, leave the cleaner in the barrel, but not to leave sweets in there or to mix sweets with other cleaners.

Once again, if you use an abrasive cleaner I don't see a benefit, and if it's a chemical cleaner could it be reacting with the barrel?


Compass Lake

www.compasslake.com/instructions.htm



They don't explain break in either, but after they only recomend cleaning every 300-400 rounds.


Gale McMillan started that stuff about breakin being false way back when..... and maintains that stance, but he is one of the *only* ones I know about that dont support the theory of break-in.

www.6mmbr.com/GailMcMbreakin.html



He's also the only one from the ones you posted that explains WHY barrel break in isn't usefull. Also, I talked to Obermyer as well and he also dosen't recomend breaking in barrels.

David Tubb is one of the worlds top shooters:

www.snipercountry.com/InReviews/DavidTubbsFinalFinish.asp

www.zediker.com/articles/break_in.pdf

www.outdoors.net/site/features/feature.aspx+Forum+Firearms+ArticleCode+1759+V+N+SearchTerm+

With what he describes in his, I'm almost posative that the chemicals being employed are softening the outermost layer of barrel material. There's no way a sliding piece of copper should be able to wear stainless steeel as rapidly as is described in these articles. Especially if it's a thin copper jacket squezing a piece of lead (less preasure than solid copper would provide).

You might be right. But like I said.... I'll got with the majority of the industry and shooters..... and from what I can see, they break them in, and they clean them often.

I don't know that I am right. I'm only repeating what I've been told by various barrel manufacturers over the phone and my somewhat limited experiance from metalurgy and chemistry. I did a fair amount of homework for my first rifle build including calling up different places to find out what to look for, what they offer and so on. I can't say I talked to Krieger, but I did look at the website.
1_AR_NEWBIE  [Team Member]
5/8/2006 8:19:49 PM
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persimmonpete  [Team Member]
5/8/2006 8:42:18 PM
It always amazes me how some folks think they have a corner on the market when it comes to intelligence. Here is some more reading from the manufacturers:

From Krieger:
www.kriegerbarrels.com/RapidCat/catalog/pagetemplate.cfm?template=/RapidCat/common/viewPage.cfm&PageId=2558&CompanyId=1246

From the Hart Barrels site:
What do you recommend for barrel break-in?
We do not believe that a break in procedure is required with our barrels. If you follow our normal cleaning procedure, outlined in this brochure, you should not have any problems with your new rifle. You always want to clean your rifle as often as your course of fire will allow. If you have time to shoot one and clean, that would be fine, but we personally do not feel it is necessary. Please be sure to only use the cleaning solvents listed in our cleaning instructions.

Can I get my barrel too clean?
Yes, it is possible to get your barrel too clean, or to actually dry out the stainless steel. After brushing your barrel with a brass brush soaked with Hoppe's #9, Shooters Choice, or Butch's Bore Shine & Oil, several times and letting it soak for a few minutes, run a couple of dry patches in your barrel. Shoot a few more rounds, and if there is a considerable amount of cooper or fouling, then you may need to repeat the procedure. The key is, if your rifle is performing well, then you are probably getting it clean enough.

From Lilja:
www.riflebarrels.com/articles/barrel_making/barrel_fouling.htm

From Gale McMillan:
yarchive.net/gun/barrel/break_in.html

and another version from Gale:
www.6mmbr.com/GailMcMbreakin.html

Bottom line - follow the recommendations of the manufacturer of your barrel. If he says shoot one and clean, shoot one and clean - do it. If he says otherwise, do that. I knew I shouldn't have said anything.
blinddog1  [Member]
5/8/2006 9:57:29 PM


Gee I didn't mean to start a shit storm, this whole AR thing is sort of new to me, been away from the platform for thirty plus years. Then cleaning was field strip and dump parts in squad cleaning tub, brush hell out of every thing and stick them back togeather. Oh yea and keep a rod taped to the forearm to clean them when they jammed in the field.

I have shot long range match rifles with heavy match grade barrels just no stainless ones. I know how to break in a chrome moly Barrel just wanted to know if there was any special procedure with the AR and stainless.. Thanks I learned what I wanted to know.
ToeBall  [Member]
5/8/2006 10:12:43 PM
Blinddog, I'm not arguing for the sake of arguing, I'm doing it to learn. This is a very good thread so far...
FALARAK  [Team Member]
5/8/2006 10:22:05 PM

Originally Posted By ToeBall:
Mabey I am inacurate or mabey I'm lucky. Here's a 200 yard group shot 2 weekends ago (went jet skiing last weekend so I didn't shoot). I'm sorry, I have no way to prove that it was at 200 yards but for the sake of argument, take my word for it, ok?



Fair enough.



I'm trying to be civilized and mabey learn something here, no reason to be a prick.


You are right, you are, and I apologize. I get carried away.



I have a barrel that rapidly degrades from .75MOA to 1.5MOA due to copper buildup.... but then, it isnt a match barrel, and wasnt lapped at the factory. Without a doubt, I dont see the same level of copper buildup in my match barrels.


What's the barrel's make and specs? I wonder if it has anything to do with some match barrels having shallower rifling than regular production barrels. Also, I suppose if a barrel is lapped in different manners, or throated differently it could affect how much copper it abbraids.



Bone stock Remington 700 PSS barrel in .308.


According to this site, the only part that gets affected during break in is the troat area, but since you get throat errosion from just shooting, and since your equipment protects the throat I don't see that scrubbing the barrel actually makes a difference here. Mabey I'm missing something though.


It's definitely an arguable theory.


They give a recomended procedure but don't even explain why. Just shoot and clean and don't leave amonia based cleaners in too long. I wonder, again if there could be a chemical reaction between the barrel's alloy and the cleaning solvents.


The point I was trying to make, is that a bunch of barrel manufacturers seem to like the break-in theory.... and most say to clean as often as you can (not remove ALL copper every time.... but their comments lead one to believe cleaning with quality components and solvents wont damage a bore.)



www.compasslake.com/instructions.htm


They don't explain break in either, but after they only recomend cleaning every 300-400 rounds.



Actually - they recommend removing all copper every 300-400 rounds. Their website doesnt explain it very well, but trust me, they dont mean ZERO cleaning between every 300-400 rounds. Thats just the max before you need to use something strong and remove the copper buildup. CLE makes service rifle barrels, and those guys definitely clean at LEAST between each match, if not more often.

In any case, this discussion on break-in, like most.... just comes down to "who you gonna believe" The most important thing is to present all the facts out there, as many opinions as possible (and the technical arguments behind them) and let each shooter make their own informed decision based on the lind of shooting they will do, and the kind of accuracy they will be demanding.
ToeBall  [Member]
5/8/2006 10:49:28 PM
You know, the more I read about this, the more I'd like to see some empiracle testing done in a controlled environment. I may have to write up an experiment and see if I can get some of the different manufacturers to send me a few various metal shavings for testing/analysys as well as different cleaners and solvents. I haven't done any lab work in 5 years or so though. Wish I still had access to a GC/Mass Spec. Would be nice to know what we're working with.
EvilBert  [Team Member]
5/9/2006 9:35:43 AM


A few things to consider....


1. Firing one shot, clean, repeat, five or six times is not going to hurt the barrel of a new rifle and may help it shoot better, then again it might not.

2. Most people don't need to worry about it because they will never be able to shoot well enough to notice the difference anyway.

3. Proper cleaning does not and cannot damage the barrel.

4. If you think running a bronze brush and a couple of patches down the bore of your rifle does as much wear to it as firing a single round you may need to start looking for a village, cause there's one missing an idiot.

5. With modern barrel manufacturing breaking the barrel is is less important than it used to be. Many factory barrels are increadibly accurate right out of the box.

6. There is no 'proven' way to break in a barrel. Your best bet is to follow the directions from the manufacturer of the barrel you bought. What they recomend isn't going to hurt your barrel, and may help.

Daubs  [Member]
5/10/2006 2:00:18 PM

Originally Posted By FALARAK:
I fire 1 roun, then clean, for 10 rounds. Then every 5 rounds after that for 50 rounds. When I am shooting for groups, I rarely go 20 rounds without putting a patch down the bore..... talk to some serious match or benchrest shooters, or people who turn barrels for a living.... not the peanut gallery here. Sure, there is not a 100% industry consensus.... but there sure aint some kind of barrel manufacturers consipiracy like some wanna believe.

I use a bore guide, which eliminates any chance of nicking/wearing the throat.



I broke my stainless DCM BBL in with the above method. I used a JP bore guide (http://www.jprifles.com or http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=7595&title=AR-15+AR-10+CLEANING+ROD+GUIDE)
and JB bore compound on a patch with a wraped around style jag. To get the paste out I used a patch on the jag wetted with gun scrubber. For as bad as I shoot with open sites I could cover 3 shot groups with a dime at 50 yards, which is great for me.

Just my $0.02.
Fenian  [Team Member]
5/11/2006 11:03:04 AM
FALARAK, the only problem with using some arcane barrel break in technique is that no one will ever know how the barrel would have shot if you *didn't* do the break in procedure.

I have posted McMillan's little missives about the whole break in controversy in various threads, and tend to believe it.

I know a few BR shooters who follow McMillans advice...but BR shooters clean after every string, so copper fouling is never an issue with them.

All I know is the two Olympic Stainless Ultra Match barrels that I did try some rather complicated break in procedures with are the 2 least accrurate barrels I have. I have a couple of ER Shaw Model 1 barrels that I started to abuse from the start, and they'll both outshoot the Olys all day. Guess what method I used...the one Daubs mentioned lol.

Maybe it's my own cynicism, but I tend to believe that the whole break in procedure was started by folks who were trying to get you to wear your barrel out faster, so you'd have to buy a new one sooner.

KnobCreek  [Team Member]
5/11/2006 11:48:11 AM
I did the break-in procedure on one of my AR barrels, a Compass Lake, and didn't with my second build using a WOA stainless 18 inch barrel. Both shoot extremely well with 1/2 to 3/4 inch groups the norm (with me shooting ) No difference in performance after about 500 rounds.

Having read through this post and dozens of others over the years on the same subject, it's seems like the jury is out on what is actually required. Let's face it, serious long-range target shooters are a meticulous and precise bunch by nature. To be consistent, you do the same thing, the same way, every single time to eliminate variable and to allow for a comfortable rhythm. I suppose the routine includes how one chooses to maintain their barrel. Of course, a few of these types that I know actually replace their barrels routinely after x# of rounds because they're shooting 1/2 inch groups instead of 1/4 inch groups. It's a different level of what "a bad or worn out barrel" is to some folks.

I, personally, don't have the patience for it. I feel compelled to compromise by shooting one shot and cleaning for two shots, and then 5 shots and cleans 2x. After that, I let 'em riip. No reason for this other than mental comfort in trying to meet this issue somewhere in the midde-ish.



SMOKINSTEEL  [Member]
5/11/2006 1:28:27 PM
I alos have a RRA 24" upper and here is what steve at RRA told me:



RRAMODERATOR
Industry Partner

Joined :: September 2005
Post Number :: 733

IL, USA


Not necessary.
The barrel has already been lapped and test-fired.
For the real hard-core shooters who swear that you have to break in a barrel, we offer the folowing abbreviated process:
1. Single load and fire 10 rounds, running a lightly oiled patch downthe bore after each round; then
2. Single load and fire 10 rounds, running a lightly oiled patch down the bore after rounds thee, seven and ten; then
3. Single load and fire 10 rounds, running a lightly oiled patch downthe bore after the fifth and tenth rounds.

That's it.

We've had "systems" sent to us that would literally have you shooting thousands of rounds through your barrel to break it in...You be the judge.

Steve/RRA

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