AR15.Com Archives
 Differences between H, H2, H3 buffers
jadams951  [Team Member]
7/21/2006 8:30:30 AM EST
What are they?
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ggllggll  [Team Member]
7/21/2006 8:32:38 AM EST
I think it is weight.

How much, I dont know
Stainless  [Member]
7/21/2006 9:23:22 AM EST
BUFFER WEIGHTS

Rifle - 5.15oz, made of aluminum

CAR - 2.9oz, made of aluminum

H - 3.77oz

H2 - 4.7oz

H3 – 5.6oz

9mm - 5.47oz, made of steel


Special purpose buffers designed for suppressed SMG's or 9mm carbines using high pressure (+P+) ammunition

9mm A - 6.3oz CAR style buffer

9mm B - 7.1oz CAR style buffer

9mm X - 7.9oz CAR style buffer



have a good one
robino  [Member]
8/13/2006 9:00:17 PM EST
which CARBINE buffer would be recommended on a 6.8 rifle (Barrett)?
stock it comes with a rifle buffer/A2 stock, but i'd like to replace it with a collaps. stock.

anyone know for sure?
TigerStripe  [Member]
8/13/2006 9:09:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By robino:
which CARBINE buffer would be recommended on a 6.8 rifle (Barrett)?
stock it comes with a rifle buffer/A2 stock, but i'd like to replace it with a collaps. stock.

anyone know for sure?


For sure, no. I use a 9mm buffer in my 14.5" 5.56mm. I have never had it fail to lock back when the mag runs dry even with Wolf polymer .223. 9mm buffers are $25, I would try one of those first.

TS

ETA: the "plain" 9mm buffers are $25. I have no idea how much the 9mm A, 9mm X, etc cost.
redfisher  [Team Member]
8/14/2006 1:48:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By ggllggll:
I think it is weight.

How much, I dont know


Stainless specs cover it well.

The most recent Small Arms Review Magazine article on the Colt SCAR entries, described the buffer differences simply as:

The H1 buffer has 2 standard weights and one tungsten, and the H2 has 2 tungsten and one standard, which leads one to believe the H3 is 3 tungsten weights.

The H was introduced to counter the problem of light-strikes in 14.5" barrelled guns.

The H2 was introduced to do the same for shorter guns.
brasidas  [Member]
8/14/2006 5:45:49 AM EST
Is there any downside to using a H3 buffer in a 5.56 16" carbine?
mr_wilson  [Team Member]
8/14/2006 6:06:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By brasidas:
Is there any downside to using a H3 buffer in a 5.56 16" carbine?


Don't believe there are any. I'm running the 9mm buffer in my 16" & 14.5" M4s.

Cheap and economical way of reducing recoil and slowing the cycle making the rifle more reliable and creating less muzzle rise (note: AR15 is NOT a heavy recoil weapon)
Mike
dmk0210  [Team Member]
8/14/2006 7:22:29 AM EST
Why is the standard carbine buffer so light anyway? Is it just the way it worked out because of size & materials or was it purposely lightened for some reason?

swenis  [Member]
8/14/2006 9:49:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By dmk0210:
Why is the standard carbine buffer so light anyway? Is it just the way it worked out because of size & materials or was it purposely lightened for some reason?



Same question. I'm really interested in getting a 9mm buffer for my 5.56 AR, but not if it will somehow decrease reliability.
TigerStripe  [Member]
8/14/2006 9:57:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By swenis:

Originally Posted By dmk0210:
Why is the standard carbine buffer so light anyway? Is it just the way it worked out because of size & materials or was it purposely lightened for some reason?



Same question. I'm really interested in getting a 9mm buffer for my 5.56 AR, but not if it will somehow decrease reliability.


The worst thing it will do is cause the bolt not to lock back on light .223 loads, like Wolf Polymer. I've never experienced a single malfunction with mine, even with Wolf polymer.

TS
swenis  [Member]
8/14/2006 10:49:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By TigerStripe:

Originally Posted By swenis:

Originally Posted By dmk0210:
Why is the standard carbine buffer so light anyway? Is it just the way it worked out because of size & materials or was it purposely lightened for some reason?



Same question. I'm really interested in getting a 9mm buffer for my 5.56 AR, but not if it will somehow decrease reliability.


The worst thing it will do is cause the bolt not to lock back on light .223 loads, like Wolf Polymer. I've never experienced a single malfunction with mine, even with Wolf polymer.

TS


Would you say that one of the heavier buffers, such as a 9mm, significantly reduces the felt recoil impulse over a standard H buffer?

The reason I ask is that I'm currently using an LMT H-buffer but am strongly considering a heavier buffer. Which would be a better purchase, a 9mm or H3?
TigerStripe  [Member]
8/14/2006 10:57:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By swenis:
Would you say that one of the heavier buffers, such as a 9mm, significantly reduces the felt recoil impulse over a standard H buffer?

The reason I ask is that I'm currently using an LMT H-buffer but am strongly considering a heavier buffer. Which would be a better purchase, a 9mm or H3?


A 9mm buffer will considerably reduce bolt bounce and felt recoil. It also reduces muzzle climb. The best buy is the standard 9mm buffer. For $25 bucks you're a few tenths of an ounce from the H3 buffer. The difference between an H buffer and a 9mm buffer is big and you won't regret buying it. I hope this helps.

TS
swenis  [Member]
8/14/2006 11:14:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By TigerStripe:

A 9mm buffer will considerably reduce bolt bounce and felt recoil. It also reduces muzzle climb. The best buy is the standard 9mm buffer. For $25 bucks you're a few tenths of an ounce from the H3 buffer. The difference between an H buffer and a 9mm buffer is big and you won't regret buying it. I hope this helps.

TS


You bet! I'll add a 9mm buffer to the order I'm going to be placing this evening. Thanks!
stephen_101st  [Member]
8/14/2006 3:07:04 PM EST
A buffer that is too heavy can cause short stroking, failure to feed, and/or failure to extract. It is best to build up to what ever you decide runs best with your rifle. In other words, if your rifle is running fine right now with a standard buffer, don't go straight to an H3 or one of the 9mm buffers and expect it to run right.

Stephen
mr_wilson  [Team Member]
8/15/2006 1:56:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By stephen_101st:
A buffer that is too heavy can cause short stroking, failure to feed, and/or failure to extract. It is best to build up to what ever you decide runs best with your rifle. In other words, if your rifle is running fine right now with a standard buffer, don't go straight to an H3 or one of the 9mm buffers and expect it to run right.

Stephen


While it's always good advice to "go-slow" and make moderate changes, in this case, considering the large number of folks that have replaced their stock buffers for the 9mm choice; as long as we're talking a problem free 16 or 14.5" M4 rifle, seriously doubt this change will cause any issues. (other than wishing one had made this mod earlier)

Mike
dmk0210  [Team Member]
8/15/2006 2:47:08 PM EST
I'm not sure I see why a reasonably heavier buffer should cause any cycling problems unless there's something wrong with the rifle. During the AWB, thousands of carbines came NIB with A2 stocks and standard rifle buffers. They worked fine.

scottryan  [Team Member]
8/15/2006 5:15:56 PM EST
The H2 buffer is used in 14.5" HB carbines.


Scott
1_AR_NEWBIE  [Team Member]
8/16/2006 5:10:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By dmk0210:
I'm not sure I see why a reasonably heavier buffer should cause any cycling problems unless there's something wrong with the rifle. During the AWB, thousands of carbines came NIB with A2 stocks and standard rifle buffers. They worked fine.



Yes, yes they did, however is an A2 receiver extension the same length as a carbine?


Mike
brasidas  [Member]
8/17/2006 4:55:49 AM EST

Originally Posted By scottryan:
The H2 buffer is used in 14.5" HB carbines.


Scott

The last Small Arms Review said the same thing. It also said not to use H2 buffers with thin profile M4 barrels, as it can produce failures in cold temperatures. FWIW.
abnk  [Member]
8/28/2006 6:09:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By brasidas:

Originally Posted By scottryan:
The H2 buffer is used in 14.5" HB carbines.


Scott

The last Small Arms Review said the same thing. It also said not to use H2 buffers with thin profile M4 barrels, as it can produce failures in cold temperatures. FWIW.


How would that happen?
CitySlicker  [Team Member]
8/28/2006 6:53:59 AM EST
GReat info stainless.
watersniper  [Team Member]
8/28/2006 2:08:29 PM EST

Originally Posted By robino:
which CARBINE buffer would be recommended on a 6.8 rifle (Barrett)?
stock it comes with a rifle buffer/A2 stock, but i'd like to replace it with a collaps. stock.

anyone know for sure?


I ran my 13" 6.8SPC barrel with an Enidine buffer before I cut the barrel back to 12"... It ran great. I'm not sure on the weight of the Enidine.
AR15barrels  [Dealer]
8/29/2006 8:55:12 AM EST
This is where I always post Slash's buffer table...

Boatanchor  [Member]
8/29/2006 8:59:16 AM EST
where is the best place to buy a 9mm or H3 buffer?
B
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