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 What's needed to convert AR-15 to left hand version?
johnsopa  [Team Member]
12/19/2005 5:17:37 PM
I am looking for a complete list of items necessary to convert an AR-15 over to a left hand discharge model.

So far, I've found:

Stag left handed upper receiver
Forward Assist Assembly (left hand version)
Left handed bolt carrier assembly (carrier and bolt)

Anything else? I heard a bolt extension might be necessary but is this a swap item?

Thanks,

John
stangleonthedangle  [Member]
12/19/2005 5:35:56 PM
Sell your upper and just buy a new lefty upper .
Gimme_A_Carbine  [Member]
12/19/2005 5:44:31 PM

Originally Posted By stangleonthedangle:
Sell your upper and just buy a new lefty upper .



yep
johnsopa  [Team Member]
12/19/2005 11:25:30 PM
Actually, I don't have an AR yet. Unfortunately, Stag's upper selection is pretty limited -- they don't have a varmint or match quality upper set.

So, I have to either build one from scratch or buy one (e.g., RRA Varmint) and convert it.
Big-FED  [Team Member]
12/20/2005 8:47:46 AM
Having been a leftie for over 62 years and involved with DOD and LEO activities since age 19 and am now retired, the key word is ADAPT. An ambi safety and mag release is about all the change that needs to be made. You won't shoot any better with a custom rifle that only you can use (or any other nearby lefties). While stationed in Germany, I shot a borrowed 7.62x51 300 meter free rifle (open sights, right hand thumbhole) left handed and still turned in a respectible group (I didn't win, but I didn't lose either). It's all in the trigger finger and breathing.

In the early days, all my handgun shooting was right handed since there were no left handed holsters and other gear. Only in the late 80's did quality lefty carry gear start to be available. About the only firearm I still have to run right handed are reveolvers.
johnsopa  [Team Member]
12/20/2005 9:22:56 AM
Sorry, I should have mentioned that I'll sometimes be shooting this AR suppressed -- gas discharge is a real pain to deal with.
Big-FED  [Team Member]
12/20/2005 10:03:38 AM

Originally Posted By johnsopa:
Sorry, I should have mentioned that I'll sometimes be shooting this AR suppressed -- gas discharge is a real pain to deal with.



There are literally hundreds of left handed operators in every service and LEO unit on missions all over the world and they cope. Nearly all of these folks practice with weak side whether they are a lefty or righty. Events drive tactics and operators must adapt or DIE. Many of these operators use suppressed weapons, but are using proper eye protection, whether goggles, wraps or other eyewear.

You seem determined to go the "one of" route, so all that can be done is to let you go your way. The advice here is free and you are free to make the decision.
johnsopa  [Team Member]
12/20/2005 4:56:11 PM
Thanks for the advice. I decided to the the White Oak Armament route. John Holliger is building me a varmint WOA upper using left hand discharge components.

Can't wait to shoot it!
Gmountain  [Member]
12/20/2005 8:50:45 PM

Originally Posted By Big-FED:
Having been a leftie for over 62 years and involved with DOD and LEO activities since age 19 and am now retired, the key word is ADAPT..



C'mon now. Why be forced to adapt when there is something better. Change isn't a bad thing, it's a good thing. It's great you adapted, but now people don't HAVE to adapt.

Big-FED  [Team Member]
12/21/2005 8:24:00 AM
Adaptation by us "main gauche" folk has been a part of our lives and it allows us to instinctively complete tasks that "main droite" folks don't even have to think about. Being adept, through adaptation, of using right handed implements, can mean survival. Even the task of writing a sentence in English is designed for right handers. Left handers have to modify the way they write to keep from dragging their hands through the ink as they progress. That's why ones sees the oddly arched wrist or pads at such "wierd" angles for lefties.

Same goes for using almost any tool, among which our AR's are included. I have left handed bolt rifles, but I grew up on right handed ones and it makes no difference to me which I shoot. In the event I have no access to "my" custom tools, I can do quite well with the ones at hand.

My main point is that those of us that are lefties, already adapt to the right handed world in many ways you righties don't even realize. Many of us are ambidexterous, doing things with either hand or even some tasks righthanded only. Ever watch a "rightie" try to use a left handed rifle or those scarce other "leftie" designed tools, or even use their left hand to perform a task they easily perform right handed. It's FUN for us to watch them. They look so... awkward!

Given the luxury of time and money, yes, custom designed tools are great. Given reality, adaptation could be the difference of life or death. Waiting until the last minute to do so is not cool.



DevL  [Member]
12/22/2005 2:07:18 PM
Id go for a piston gas system over a left handed operation if gas is the problem.
FALARAK  [Team Member]
12/22/2005 2:12:27 PM
<----- Is a lefty, and would never own a left handed weapon. Of all the rifles out there, the AR15 is the easiest for a lefty to master.
FALARAK  [Team Member]
12/22/2005 2:13:21 PM

Originally Posted By DevL:
Id go for a piston gas system over a left handed operation if gas is the problem.



Yep.... but having shot many supressed AR's from others.... I dont see the big deal.
mr_wilson  [Team Member]
12/22/2005 2:25:16 PM

What's needed to convert AR-15 to left hand version?





NOT a god-damned thing, their already setup for rightys or leftys.

And yes, I shoot all my ARs left handed.

Mike
shamayim  [Member]
12/24/2005 9:16:03 PM
Apparently the man has money to burn, so I'm not inclined to give him my left handed, 50 years of shooting semi autos, 30years of AR ownership opinion.

All I can say is that I learned to operate the safety/selector of ARs and M16s w/my left index finger's knuckle about 1974, and when I did buy an ambi unit a few years back, I had no luck using the thumb piece, so I took the unit off and went back to the stock piece.

My point is that you learn what you need to in this world, and if what you learn works, there's no point in trying to learn something else.