AR15.Com Archives
 stock trigger polishing discussion
kiddog  [Member]
2/15/2012 11:00:09 AM
looking for the thread on using flitz metal polish to break in & smooth out a stock trigger. searched archieves but couldn't find it.
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srob7001  [Member]
2/15/2012 12:03:59 PM
you mean this one?

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_3_4/544583_Trigger_work_.html
FMJ  [Team Member]
2/15/2012 12:30:31 PM
I would leave it as is!
Or buy a new trigger
CIE  [Member]
2/15/2012 1:52:02 PM
I see no issue with a light polish on the sear face. I just did one for a friend with a CMMG kit. I bobbed the hammer, installed JP springs and polished the sear face with some light steel polish on my dremel. It came out nice and there are no issues going through hardening that way. All you're doing is expediting a trigger bedding itself. This was for a fun only gun, so no worries about it not igniting primers and such.

I used the polish that came with my dremel kit. Not sure what kind it is. I've tried Brasso and it wasn't quite abbrasive enough for the hardened steal. It's a paste style polish. I'm sure you could find something suitable at a local hardware store.
srob7001  [Member]
2/15/2012 2:12:54 PM
Originally Posted By CIE:
I see no issue with a light polish on the sear face. I just did one for a friend with a CMMG kit. I bobbed the hammer, installed JP springs and polished the sear face with some light steel polish on my dremel. It came out nice and there are no issues going through hardening that way. All you're doing is expediting a trigger bedding itself. This was for a fun only gun, so no worries about it not igniting primers and such.

I used the polish that came with my dremel kit. Not sure what kind it is. I've tried Brasso and it wasn't quite abbrasive enough for the hardened steal. It's a paste style polish. I'm sure you could find something suitable at a local hardware store.


Agree'd

I did this same exact thing to my AR and had no issues with it.

Last weekend I put a Mega Tactical trigger in and I polished that one too.....no issues so far.

I think as long as you are not taking metal away or changing the sear angles you will be ok.
NissanGuy08  [Member]
2/15/2012 2:14:49 PM
best way to break it in is by shooting. or buy a Geissele.
Flats  [Member]
2/15/2012 2:38:09 PM
Originally Posted By CIE:
I see no issue with a light polish on the sear face. I just did one for a friend with a CMMG kit. I bobbed the hammer, installed JP springs and polished the sear face with some light steel polish on my dremel. It came out nice and there are no issues going through hardening that way. All you're doing is expediting a trigger bedding itself. This was for a fun only gun, so no worries about it not igniting primers and such.

I used the polish that came with my dremel kit. Not sure what kind it is. I've tried Brasso and it wasn't quite abbrasive enough for the hardened steal. It's a paste style polish. I'm sure you could find something suitable at a local hardware store.


I don't see any issue with it, but I didn't see any great improvement either. I got mine (Stag lpk) very, very smooth with a felt wheel & jeweler's rouge, but the improvement was minor. Much of the grit in the spec trigger is simply in the geometry, and there's only so much you can do without changing the geometry. I ended up with a Geissele.
woodsman556  [Team Member]
2/15/2012 2:41:33 PM
FYI - polishing does remove metal.
srob7001  [Member]
2/15/2012 3:12:35 PM
Originally Posted By woodsman556:
FYI - polishing does remove metal.



I don't see polishing one taking anymore metal off than shooting it would.

Polish = felt wheel w/ polishing compound to smooth out metal on metal contact points
Shooting = metal on metal wearing down until it is smooth

The same results are achieved in the end, polishing just speeds it up
CIE  [Member]
2/15/2012 3:26:48 PM
Originally Posted By woodsman556:
FYI - polishing does remove metal.


Definitely not going to get any argument from me, but all you're really doing is knocking down the high spots. If you're polished through the hardening, then you're taking things a bit too far and have a lot of time on your hands or are using a very coarse polishing compound and wheel.
Mounger  [Member]
2/15/2012 3:39:59 PM
I have used Armand Hammer Toothpaste with good results. This brand seems to be the most abrasive. You can also put it under the faucet and just wash the stuff out of the trigger group when your done.

This and doing the "15 Minute Trigger Job" and your about as good as you can get with a stock trigger.

If you do the 15 Minute Trigger Job" be sure you are not using an already reduced power spring set. It is a good idea to have a spare set of stock springs handy, as I have finally seen a couple that were too light, in spite of using stock springs.
woodsman556  [Team Member]
2/15/2012 4:03:54 PM
Not trying to be a dick. I just wanted to point out that polishing does indeed remove metal. If someone got too aggressive with the polishing, they could indeed go through the case hardening and into the softer metal.
gonzosc1  [Member]
2/15/2012 6:04:18 PM
15 minute set screw trigger job, JP enhanced spring kit, molygraph grease on sear and disconnector contact points.= 4lb pull
lmssts  [Member]
2/15/2012 7:17:14 PM
Originally Posted By woodsman556:
Not trying to be a dick. I just wanted to point out that polishing does indeed remove metal. If someone got too aggressive with the polishing, they could indeed go through the case hardening and into the softer metal.


I wonder how true this is or people are just saying it so no one will dick with the trigger.

I’d imagine, for such a small piece, wouldn’t it be easier to harden the whole bucket-full instead of hardening just a small portion of each?


Flats  [Member]
2/15/2012 9:24:21 PM
Originally Posted By lmssts:
Originally Posted By woodsman556:
Not trying to be a dick. I just wanted to point out that polishing does indeed remove metal. If someone got too aggressive with the polishing, they could indeed go through the case hardening and into the softer metal.


I wonder how true this is or people are just saying it so no one will dick with the trigger.

I’d imagine, for such a small piece, wouldn’t it be easier to harden the whole bucket-full instead of hardening just a small portion of each?




Case-hardening is sorta like a surface treatment. The entire exterior of the parts are case hardened, but the depth is limited.
Firebird69  [Team Member]
2/15/2012 9:41:33 PM
I use Flitz to polish all of my triggers and various other firearm parts. I works great and can be done well with a Dremel. Some of them have thousands of rounds through them sans any problems.
Mounger  [Member]
2/15/2012 9:57:26 PM
Originally Posted By woodsman556:
Not trying to be a dick. I just wanted to point out that polishing does indeed remove metal. If someone got too aggressive with the polishing, they could indeed go through the case hardening and into the softer metal.


You are right. I have worn through this (with use not polishing) too many times to know its true. That is when you get a really shitty trigger pull.

So, if any of you guys polish so much that the trigger pull got worse, that means you went too far.

Chames  [Member]
4/15/2012 4:47:08 PM
I am under the impression that the case hardened trigger sear and hammer sear are hardened to a depth of between 1mm and 1.5 mm. That is roughly between 1 and 1.5 credit cards thick.

I hear a lot of people say NEVER polish the above mentioned surfaces because you will remove the case hardening and go cyclic.

Polishing the factory tool marks and grinding a credit card worth of material seems like its a fairly wide margin of error.

Am I missing something here?
tbougie1  [Team Member]
4/15/2012 5:19:57 PM
Save the tooth paste for your tooth. Buy jeweler's rouge if you really feel you need to try to smooth your trigger. Then after it goes away , buy a decent trigger..
Kilroytheknifesnob  [Member]
4/15/2012 6:18:00 PM
Originally Posted By gonzosc1:
15 minute set screw trigger job, JP enhanced spring kit, molygraph grease on sear and disconnector contact points.= 4lb pull


This man speaks the truth.
k80clay  [Member]
4/15/2012 7:36:33 PM
Don't use anything stronger than Flitz.

Use a q-tip to dab a little in the engagement notch. Hold the hammer back a little to get some in there. With the upper off and you thumb to block the hammer, pull and reset the trigger / hammer about 40 times. Dab a little more flitz in there and repeat. Repeat. Repeat. Do it while watching a TV show or something. 20 or 30 minutes later, hose the whole thing off with brake cleaner and re-oil. POOF - perfect trigger job - no risk of chaging any angles, or grinding through the hardening. You'll have a much smoother, much nicer trigger.

You're welcome.

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