AR15.Com Archives
 decibel levels of .223 and .45
gun4vet  [Member]
4/19/2007 5:58:28 PM
Does anyone know of a chart for decibel levels of different arms such as the AR-15 .223 and the .45 1911?
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fivepointoh  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 6:03:26 PM
fuckin sharp and loud....final answer
Blanco_Diablo  [Member]
4/19/2007 6:10:11 PM

Originally Posted By fivepointoh:
fuckin sharp and loud....final answer

+1!

One time at the range, I was shooting my SP1 with a full 20 round mag, and after about 5 rounds, my earplug (on the side of the rifle of course) freakin fell out and i kept going through the last 15 rounds or so. Needless to say, my ear rang for a lil while
gun4vet  [Member]
4/19/2007 6:15:01 PM
Just trying to figure out how hearing protectors say they reduce loud noise by 20-30 decibels but if the blast is 140 then it still quite a bit over the "safe" 85 decibel limit. Thinking of getting some Sordin Supreme Pro and they won't allow more than 85 to get through. That seems better than just keeping out 30 decibels. Does anyone use the Sordins?
NAM  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 6:25:43 PM

Originally Posted By gun4vet:
Just trying to figure out how hearing protectors say they reduce loud noise by 20-30 decibels but if the blast is 140 then it still quite a bit over the "safe" 85 decibel limit. Thinking of getting some Sordin Supreme Pro and they won't allow more than 85 to get through. That seems better than just keeping out 30 decibels. Does anyone use the Sordins?


Hearing safe is typically below 130 decibels.
JohnCollins  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 6:41:16 PM
I'm serious about hearing protection, as well, but the decibel level depends on the orientation of you and the gun when it goes off and whether or not you're inside or outside. Inside shooting is a LOT louder.

If I'm inside, I use foam plugs (Silencio is my favorite for comfort and they drop a very effective 31 db) and Peltor muffs. If I'm outside, either the plugs or the muffs are sufficient because the sound is not contained.

Hope that helps. I don't bother with the math and adding up decibels, but plugs and muffs is very comfortable indoors and I'm not doing any damage to my hearing (just had it tested), so it's working.

John
JPratt06  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 6:44:55 PM

Originally Posted By NAM:

Originally Posted By gun4vet:
Just trying to figure out how hearing protectors say they reduce loud noise by 20-30 decibels but if the blast is 140 then it still quite a bit over the "safe" 85 decibel limit. Thinking of getting some Sordin Supreme Pro and they won't allow more than 85 to get through. That seems better than just keeping out 30 decibels. Does anyone use the Sordins?


Hearing safe is typically below 130 decibels.


Hearing safe, according to the European risk limit (the agreed standard), is 140 db. One must also take into account exposure time and other factors.

A .45 is around 160-165 db iirc, and the AR (depending on bbl length) is around there too.
GHPorter  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 6:53:55 PM
The decibel scale is logarithmic. Reducing by 10 drops the power of the sound in half. Reducing by 40 drops the sound in half FOUR times. So you can't just look at the numbers and do arithmetic on them.

I'll also point out that a lot of people (Air Force weapons instructors by regulation) wear both plugs and covers while on the line. This is because exposure is cumulative and so id the potential for damage.

One final note: DO EVERYTHING YOU CAN TO PROTECT YOUR HEARING! I have a hearing loss that is just under the level the VA compensates for-and it's freaking frustrating to be able to hear stuff but not understand it! And my tinnitus is a major pain too. So what? I ALWAYS WORE HEARING PROTECTION EVERY TIME IT WAS REQUIRED. In other words, hearing loss will sneak up on you. It NEVER comes back-protect it NOW.
gun4vet  [Member]
4/19/2007 7:02:35 PM
Do you know what the VA compensates for in terms of loss? It is probably too late for me. I not only lost some hearing growing up on a farm but also with the USMC and a year in the Nam, etc. I have hearing loss but don't use hearing aids at this time. Got real serious about protection after all that happened. Now I'm starting to shoot more and am wondering what the best protection is. I think I like the electronic ones so that you can hear someone speaking to you. Thanks for the input. Using both protective aids seems like a good idea.
NAM  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 7:04:07 PM
Here is a general listing of levels.

140dB Jet plane take off , fi recracker, gun shot Sudden damage to hearing
130dB Pain threshold exceeded
120dB Ambulance siren, pneumatic drill, rock concert
110dB Night clubs, disco
100dB Motor cycle at 50km/h
90dB Heavy goods vehicle at 50km/h
85dB Hearing protection recommended in industry Hearing loss, tinnitus
75dB Cardiovascular eff ects
70dB Sleep disturbances
65dB Stress eff ects
60dB Annoyance
55dB Desirable outdoor level
50dB Normal conversation level
40dB Quiet suburb
30dB Shoft whisper
20dB Normal conversation level

Also, if you check www.silencertests.com, it has listed readings.....both suppressed and unsuppressed.
YoungGunA4  [Member]
4/19/2007 7:24:52 PM
I have a .45 with a short barrel, if I shoot it without hearing protection it is vicious loud, actualy painfull. I also have a 20" AR which i don't find to be bad with out plugs, but I have a 16" which is very loud. I have a .270 which I don't find to be to bad.

I think it has a lot to do with the burn rate of the powder in relation to the bore size and barrel length.

I try not to shoot without protection, but there have been times when it was "necessary".

ETA: there is a girl listining to rap music with headphones about 15 feet away from me, its so loud I can hear it clearly, every cussword and derogetory saying.......I wonder how many decibles that is to her?
gun4vet  [Member]
4/19/2007 7:45:18 PM
I can't even consider going without, nor should anyone IMHO. I looking at the Sordin Supreme Pro. If I go out at night to shoot a varmint I want to hear normal noises. My old standard muffs block out everything.
DBR  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 9:09:51 PM
I have Sordins - the ones that fit under a helmet. They are actually given a NRR rating of 20 although it depends on the frequency. They are noticeably louder than my Peltors. One thing I like about them is I can wear my custom fitted ear plugs under them and turn the volume up all the way and have the best of both worlds - 30-35 equivalent NRR and still hear range commands and loud speech. IMO Sordins are not adequate by themselves for long term hearing protection.

Mine were designed more for entry team or similar short term use where using attached communications was necessary, they had to fit under a military type helmet and exposure would be very limited. This info was obtained directly from the tech at the US importer several years ago. I think I have the same model you are considering.

The generally accepted noise levels you asked about 1M from the side of the muzzle:

223 NATO 20" barrel 160-165db (nearly twice as loud from 14-16" tube)
45ACP 5" barrel approx 155db (9mm is similar to 45 but higher frequency)
This is outdoors.

These numbers are dependent on barrel length and load. They would be less from the shooter's normal position.

For the use you just stated Sordins would be fine. For half the money the Peltor tactical 6 or 7 would do the job and have a NRR of 25-28.

One last comment. The Peltors were originally designed as listening devices and they have the best sound fidelity and directionality of anything I have tried. The Sordins are close though. I have both and the Peltors are beside my bed.
gun4vet  [Member]
4/19/2007 9:27:29 PM
They sound like same ones although these meet or exceed Mil Spec for military use and rated for hunting and shooting. I'm surprised you find them louder. I'm a little concerned about that. Maybe they aren't quite the same model?? It says they have an NRR of 18.
DBR  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 9:37:57 PM
A NRR of 18 sounds louder than a 20NRR and if you get the full info from Sordin you will find that it is very frequency dependent. In general the deeper the cup the higher the NRR rating other things being equal. I believe the NRR ratings are db reduction so higher numbers mean better protection.
GHPorter  [Team Member]
4/19/2007 9:41:42 PM

Originally Posted By gun4vet:
Do you know what the VA compensates for in terms of loss? It is probably too late for me. I not only lost some hearing growing up on a farm but also with the USMC and a year in the Nam, etc. I have hearing loss but don't use hearing aids at this time. Got real serious about protection after all that happened. Now I'm starting to shoot more and am wondering what the best protection is. I think I like the electronic ones so that you can hear someone speaking to you. Thanks for the input. Using both protective aids seems like a good idea.
It's all about loss in the "speech frequencies." I'm about 1/2 db too good to warrant compensation for this, but that would in no way mean that I'd need hearing aids.

(Of course with all the "worn out and torn up" parts on me, the VA would buy me hearing aids, glasses, prostheses, etc...everything but dental care! I wish I was joking.)
hooknladder  [Member]
4/19/2007 10:10:13 PM
Be safe and wear plugs and muffs. Not like you need to hear the blast to know it is there. I reserce my hearing for concerts and night clubs
NVBGear  [Dealer]
4/19/2007 10:56:54 PM
If you are shooting a firearm, wear ear pro. Plugs minimum, muffs and plugs are better. The protection is not cumulative, so if you have 30 db rated plugs and 21 db rated muffs you are not getting 51db worth of attenuation, but it makes a big enough difference I wish I had started wearin them both years ago.
Ando  [Member]
4/19/2007 11:38:47 PM
Great site with before and after test results for various weapons and silencers.

Silencer test results
Walsh  [Team Member]
8/6/2007 1:24:50 AM

Originally Posted By Ando:
Great site with before and after test results for various weapons and silencers.

Silencer test results


Thanks...I've asked over there if the ear is within the same sound envelope as a meter left of the barrel.

Walsh
DM1975  [Team Member]
8/6/2007 1:31:46 AM
Should it matter? Wear ear pro all the time folks...
DBR  [Team Member]
8/6/2007 1:45:08 AM
To some extent the sound is projected forward from the muzzle so from the shooters ear position the sound will be less than beside the muzzle. It will also be less on the off side ear.

Custom plugs made by an audiologist cost around $60 and usually work better than foam. They also stay put. Mine are 7 years old (silicone rubber) and I use them for may purposes other than shooting.
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